A basically free house

Discussion in 'Home Construction and Remodeling' started by Cnsper, Aug 12, 2018.

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  1. Aug 12, 2018 #1

    Cnsper

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    So I have my land but money has been tight. Since there is no need for me to have a building permit I am doing the construction myself.

    I decided to go with a pier and beam since it's fairly dry. I have posts in the ground and started on the floor joists.

    I was browsing the free section on craigslist last week and came across someone giving away a shed. Upon closer reading I discovered this was actually trusses built for a bonus room over a garage.

    After looking it over in person, I am taking it apart next weekend and erecting what will basically be an A frame on stilts.

    A little bit of siding is all I have to purchase and I will have a 16x34 house. With the 6x8 and 16x10 sheds I just picked up for $170 that will be plenty of room for me and the dog.

    Septic is in, well is drilled and all I have to do now is drop the well pump.

    You can live frugally if you don't mind repurposing materials. Recently went to an estate auction and got a clawfoot tub, 5 cast iron sinks, 2 wood stoves and enough red brick to install 2 stoves all for under $100.
     
  2. Aug 12, 2018 #2

    Terri9630

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    A friend of mine build their small house for less than $5,000. Her hubby was a contractor and barters all the time. The only cash expense they had was for their well pump, new roofing and screws.
     
  3. Aug 12, 2018 #3

    Meerkat

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    More people should check into this kind of thing instead of just going with the flow.
    Since they can't afford a builder anyway nobody is really losing so it is good.
     
  4. Aug 12, 2018 #4

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

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    What is lacking for many people is the constant trying to have bigger and better. Many people could not live in anything less what they grew up in. Or so they think. Years ago, people lived within their means, and did not have mortgages. If they wanted or needed more, they worked on it. There were people who bought the next parts from the money left on pay day. They built gradually.

    I have a few family members who put additions on their homes. They built with the money they had until they were out of money. Then as they could, they finished the additions.

    In my home town were many families who lived in basement houses. A basement was built and outfitted for habitation. The family would live there until they had the money to build the house on top. I remember one of those basement homes which had no work on the home on top for many years. I was gone from home for years. I went home and the house had finally been built.
     
  5. Aug 12, 2018 #5

    Meerkat

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    In Stone Mountain after the old house burned down we lived in what we called 'the foundation' it would have been the basement I guess. It had rock walls set in concrete and a flat tar roof and that was it.
    We'd see lots of scorpions and snakes too. Probably all that rock. Our donkeys would kick in the door when we would go somewhere and throw flour and corn meal all over those rocks, talk about a job gettign that flour out of rough rock!:eek:. Those rocks were not cut or changed at all just set and placed and different colors ,very pretty.:cool:
     
  6. Aug 13, 2018 #6

    tiffanysgallery

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    Most people here also buy their land first but then they buy the shell kit of a metal steel building so to move onto their property right away.
     
  7. Aug 20, 2018 #7

    tiffanysgallery

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    There's a Queen Anne-style home location in Nashville, TN which could be yours -- if you can move it...

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) - A house in Midtown owned by Vanderbilt University that was used as studio of fashion designer Manuel could be yours—if you can move it. The early 20th century Queen Anne-style home is located at 1922 Broadway, just down the street from the Midtown Hattie B’s, and was constructed around 1910. Vanderbilt University acquired the property in 2016 and has offered to donate the building to anyone who will locate it for preservation. The house is not listed on the National Register of Historic Places, nor is it protected by local zoning. The Metro Historical Commission and Historic Nashville Inc. are reportedly working with Vanderbilt to identify a preservationist who can save the building for its cultural and historical value. The 108-year-old home is best known as the former studio and retail store of Manuel Cuevas, who used the building’s main floor for his shop and the other three floors as work spaces. The building was owned by the American Legion from 1948 to 1986. Cuevas is best known for his colorful designed garments for country and rock and roll stars, including Johnny Cash, Marty Stuart, Dwight Yoakam, Elvis Presley, Loretta Lynn, Dolly Parton and the Rolling Stones. Manuel moved his business to the 800 block of Broadway in 2013. The building has been vacant ever since.

    https://www.wkrn.com/news/nashville...e-could-be-yoursif-you-can-move-it/1382752870

    Zestimate
    $565,398

    Boardway Home.jpg
     
  8. Aug 20, 2018 #8

    Weedygarden

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    I don't know if you have heard that A-frame homes are difficult to keep evenly heated. The heat rises, as it always does, and the second floor, or upper part of the home is where the heat goes. Having ceiling fans is probably very important, and windows on either end up towards the top would probably be very important.
     
  9. Aug 20, 2018 #9

    Weedygarden

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    I know that my ancestors built sod shanties. I know my gg grandparents had one in Nebraska and another g grandparent had one in South Dakota. They were known for having snakes come through the walls.

    There is a building method of putting up a temporary wooden framing section, filling it with stone or rock, then adding concrete to form walls. After the framing is removed, the stone is cleaned of the excess concrete. I think of all those stone cottages and walls in Europe being built from the rock removed from the fields. That may have been true for some early homes in the eastern part of the United States.
     
  10. Aug 20, 2018 #10

    hiwall

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    There's a Queen Anne-style home location in Nashville, TN which could be yours -- if you can move it...
    You cannot move a brick house, plus the one pictured is waaay too tall to move.
     
  11. Aug 20, 2018 #11

    tiffanysgallery

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    There's a Queen Anne-style home location in Nashville, TN which could be yours -- if you can move it...

    The school (Vanderbilt University) is saying they want the house moved.
    But I did wonder if it could be moved, how that would work, how much would it cost, and would it be worth it...
    Other than moving (if it was possible) it would be basically a free house.

    I think I'll pass on this one. I did like the idea of a free house. :)
     
  12. Aug 20, 2018 #12

    Weedygarden

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    It could probably be moved by someone who knew what they were doing, knew how to prep it for a move and had the equipment. There was an art museum made of brick, that was moved less than a mile in Denver. As they showed the move on the news, there were a few bricks that had come off.

    I looked at the house and thought that moving it brick by brick was one way to move it, but not really a desirable way to do so. When it would be reconstructed, it could be much sturdier though.
     
  13. Aug 20, 2018 #13

    Star_Chick

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    Truth! Well mostly. A lot of people are getting into the tiny home craze. I had a friend that built one from the ground up. I always lived in large houses. However, I don’t mind the smaller homes. I live in a 1000sq ft home, and love it. It’s enough room for my dogs, turtle, fish, husband and I. :)

    OP: congrats on the home! I commend those who can do this type of building. It’s using what has been made and repurposing it. It’s so much better for the environment.
     
  14. Aug 20, 2018 #14

    SheepDog

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    Any unreinforced masonry building is very difficult to move. The walls tend to separate from the floors in the move and the whole thing collapses. It might be easier to disassemble it and rebuild it somewhere else adding the necessary reinforcing as it is rebuilt. That is how some bridges have been moved.
     
  15. Aug 21, 2018 #15

    Cnsper

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    Yeah, no thanks.

    Here is a photo after day 1 of the teardown. Day 2 it is all loaded and gone. Two dusty old farts can get a lot done in a day
    20180818_172343.jpg
     
  16. Aug 21, 2018 #16

    Cnsper

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    Not really an actual a frame but will look like one from the outside.
     
  17. Aug 21, 2018 #17

    Cnsper

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    Man, talk about a fugly house. Brick is not really attached to the house. Remove the brick, remove the top floor then move the house.

    Historic? Because someone used a bedazler and a glue gun to put beads on some clothes?
     
  18. Mar 25, 2019 #18

    William Egan

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  19. Mar 25, 2019 #19

    William Egan

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    Cnsper Even though money is tight, I can relate, you can still live life to the fullest. I'm just getting started with it but check out my Youtube Channel. My wife says your not capable of thinking inside the box are you? That's the key especially when no codes. I plan on building a pallet cob house. Pallets filled with clay straw slip then cob'ed over. Cod is the best longest lived , healthiest structure you can live in ( keeps humidity to 50%, no mold) and the straw slip filled pallets add enough insulation in colder climates, I plan to start mine this summer and will document it on my Youtube channel. Good luck with your endever.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 25, 2019
  20. Mar 27, 2019 #20

    CrackbottomLouis

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    Good on you for building. Quite a project to take on and I'd love to see how it turns out. I've always wanted to build a cob or hempcrete home. Now that I'm going to be able to spread out on my property I might build a small secondary structure as a small barn for a couple critters. Be a great way to practice for a larger structure later.
     
  21. Mar 28, 2019 #21

    William Egan

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    Start small lik
    Start small like a dog house or a chicken house.
     
  22. Mar 28, 2019 #22

    Cnsper

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    But his dog looks like Clifford
     
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  23. Mar 29, 2019 #23

    William Egan

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    That will be one big dog house then.
     
  24. Mar 29, 2019 #24

    SheepDog

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    Any building I put up has to be earthquake/wind proof/resistant. That means concrete and steel in the foundation. I have never been able to scrounge things like that so I am left with paying for it.
    I am working up drawings for my next house now and incorporating ties from the trusses all the way to the foundation. I will continue to use sheathing on both sides of all walls and fire resistant wall board over the sheathing. The exterior will also be covered with Hardie board sheathing and lap siding for flame resistance.
     
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  25. Mar 29, 2019 #25

    VThillman

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    In Vermont, most of the field stone went into stone walls, because there was plenty of forest to make lumber from. There is a 'Stone Village' in a nearby town (Chester) but the walls are mostly of flat stones that were never rolled around by a glacier. I think they may be split ledge. We have more than a smattering of ledge, too. Field stone chimneys, that's another story; used to be a lot of those. And chimney fires in them; lots of crannies to collect charcoally soot.

    Thar, b'god, I've passed on some more useless information. About all I've got.
     

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