"A Museum of Early American Tools

Discussion in 'Crafts and Arts' started by VThillman, Apr 2, 2018.

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  1. Apr 2, 2018 #1

    VThillman

    VThillman

    VThillman

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    https://www.amazon.com/dp/0486425606/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20

    This is the way folks used wood and iron to make tools for the jobs that needed doing - during the years from around 1630 to 1860. Those of us who are taking homesteading to include as much self-sufficiency as we can manage can get some time saving ideas. If you're going to make a tool to do a job "your ownself", it would help to get the design right the first time, eh?

    I'm not planning to live that close to the land; I'll be laid down in it soon enough. The reading and the sketches are mighty interesting though. So... that's how they did that!

    There are probably other places to find this book. A friend found the copy I have down at the recycling place, in the son-to-be scrap paper pile. Y'know, good books should be passed along from hand to hand until they fall apart, not discarded. [I continued this rant for awhile, but realized you folks don't need to read again what you know by heart.]
     
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  2. Apr 2, 2018 #2

    joel

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    I have some of those old tools.
     
  3. Nov 1, 2018 #3

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

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    @VThillman : I have a couple of Mr. Sloane's books, Diary of an Early American Boy, for one. I didn't know much about this author and artist, who had a deep interest in history.
    Have you been to the museum named for him? It's in Kent, Connecticut. https://www.ct.gov/cct/cwp/view.asp?a=2127&q=302262

    Also on the grounds of the museum is an iron furnace..."a granite blast furnace which produced pig iron for almost 70 years, beginning in 1826. The furnace is listed on the National Register of Historic Places."
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sloane-Stanley_Museum
    That sounds like a very interesting place to visit.
     
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  4. Nov 1, 2018 #4

    Weedygarden

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    Thank you for sharing this!

    Some old tools are universal in need and use, and were refined long ago.
     
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  5. Nov 1, 2018 #5

    VThillman

    VThillman

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    Never been to the museum Patch - but if I'm able I hope to go next year.
     
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  6. Nov 1, 2018 #6

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

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    The museum was closed most of this year and has re-opened.
    Looking forward to reading about your experience, @VThillman .
    If our ancestors could forge iron why can't we, or you, not me. Or Weedy. Or Amish.
    You already know how though, don't ya? Crucible. Pouring. :cool:
     
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