Bo Hog Root

Discussion in 'Natural Remedies' started by Peanut, Apr 3, 2018.

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  1. Apr 3, 2018 #1

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Peanut

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    This is Angelica venenosa, one of two species of plants in the south known as Boar Hog Root. The other one is Levisticum officinale, aka “Lovage”.

    This hairy angelica plant just leafed out. I found it this morning. It commonly gets 4ft tall and blooms in late June. When I first found this species I thought it was Water Hemlock. It was a year before I figured out the differences.

    There is a reason it looks like Water Hemlock (Cicuta virosa). They are cousin’s. Both are in the “Parsley Family” which includes edible plants like carrots and parsnips, plus spices, such as anise, celery, chervil, coriander, caraway, cumin, dill, fennel and of course, parsley. Lovage is also in the parsley family.

    The root of the plant is used as medicine. Bo Hog Root has a strong effect on an older man’s libido. It has an equally strong effect on a woman’s libido.

    This angelica can be used like other well-known Angelica species. They trigger the release of cortisol from our adrenal glands which supports digestion and raises blood sugar levels. Basically, the angelicas are used for a pale sickly person with little or no appetite.

    In native american medicinal tradition it’s known as “Bear Medicine”. Just out of hibernation bears were known to dig and eat the root of this plant. It boosted their digestive system and helped them put on weight immediately.

    Angelica (2)_v1.jpg
     
  2. Apr 3, 2018 #2

    camo2460

    camo2460

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    Angelica is a wonderful Medicinal, but it is very easily confused with Water Hemlock. My suggestion is that if you don't know exactly what you are looking at, leave it alone. Water Hemlock is dangerously Poisonous, and one Mouthful will be quickly Fatal. If you are interested in Identifying and using Angelica, have someone like Peanut take you out and show you how to Identify it through all its growing stages, and how to know the difference between the Two. When you can recite the difference between Angelica and Water Hemlock by Memory, and can Identify the difference from a distance, then and only then should you go looking for this Herb.
     
  3. Apr 3, 2018 #3

    Peanut

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    Like I wrote above it took me a year to learn the differences, it was 3 years before I was comfortable harvesting angelica.

    Edit to add... To be comfortable... it took 2 years of me looking at thousands of plants from each species, that's how similar they are. That said I can now tell the difference at highway speed, 55mph while driving.

    For a beginner, don't even try it... the results could mean your life.

    https://www.ars.usda.gov/pacific-west-area/logan.../water-hemlock-cicuta-douglasii/Aug 13, 2016 - Water hemlock is the most violently toxic plant that grows in North America. Only a small amount of the toxic substance in the plant is needed to produce poisoning in livestock or in humans. The toxin cicutoxin, acting directly on the central nervous system, is a violent convulsant.

    Not a mistake I would want to make... just sayin' :(
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2018
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  4. Apr 14, 2019 #4

    Spikedriver

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    So, if you had Bo Hog and water hemlock side by side, just exactly how do you tell the difference? This stuff fascinates me, but I'm way too much of a weenie to try harvesting wild plants on my own. I'd be liable to kill myself on my first try...
     
  5. Apr 14, 2019 #5

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

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    Like He said, if you're a beginner, don't even try it. He (@Peanut) may have the gift of being a true botanist.
     
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