BULL!!

Help Support Homesteading Forum:

Peanut

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
14,163
Location
Bama
@txcatlady What breed did you say again? I read it the other night but forgot. I don't recognize the color pattern. Will he produce small quick growing calves? He looks heavy but not that big. Your fencing is taller than mine, makes it hard to judge his size.

I think I see nasty yellow pasture buttercups in the second pic. Looks like the ones that grow here. Mine are toxic to livestock, seen then take over a neighbors pasture.
 
Last edited:

txcatlady

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 10, 2017
Messages
316
@txcatlady What breed did you say again? I read it the other night but forgot. I don't recognize the color pattern. Will he produce small quick growing calves? He looks heavy but not that big. Your fencing is taller than mine, makes it hard to judge his size.

I think I see nasty yellow pasture buttercups in the second pic. Looks like the ones that grow here. Mine are toxic to livestock, seen then take over a neighbors pasture.
He is a beefmaster as are the girls. My cattle are brangus and angus. I am hoping for more color on calves, growthy and pounds on the ground. It won’t be fun having calves in January and February. But better than no calves like I am now. Always test fertility n your bull. He still will grow as he is a 2 year old. Has a good, easy nature. My first Beefmaster so we will find out next year what this combination will produce.
 

Pearl

Finder of lost things
Neighbor
Joined
Apr 19, 2021
Messages
5,739
Location
North central Texas
He is a beefmaster as are the girls. My cattle are brangus and angus. I am hoping for more color on calves, growthy and pounds on the ground. It won’t be fun having calves in January and February. But better than no calves like I am now. Always test fertility n your bull. He still will grow as he is a 2 year old. Has a good, easy nature. My first Beefmaster so we will find out next year what this combination will produce.
He will be one beefy dude!!👍👍
 

Peanut

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
14,163
Location
Bama
No one I know runs beefmaster, within 50miles anyway. After the reading up on them today I don't know why. They sound like great bulls. Have you had them before?

We needed a new bull so I took dad with me to a bull auction down in south alabama about 6 years ago. There were over a hundred breeding bulls up for bid. Pretty sure there must have been a few Beefmaster there but I can't recall seeing one. All major breeds were there, a huge barn full of great bulls. I'd like to go down there again, I had a great time! Ended up buying a bull from a guy over at the GA state line.
 
Last edited:

txcatlady

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 10, 2017
Messages
316
No one I know runs beefmaster, within 50miles anyway. After the reading up on them today I don't know why. They sound like great bulls. Have you had them before?

We needed a new bull so I took dad with me to a bull auction down in south alabama about 6 years ago. There were over a hundred breeding bulls up for bid. Pretty sure there must have been a few Beefmaster there but I can't recall see one. All major breeds were there, a huge barn full of great bulls. I'd like to go down there again, I had a great time! Ended up buying a bull from a guy over at the GA state line.
My neighbor has a small herd of Beefmaster and kept his bull for years! Hate to think of inbreeding as he kept his heifers. He finally sold him and bought a red angus bull. I just again want to add color and pounds. If a mistake, I can get another breed. I am tired of all looking the same. Loved the process as my fist experience to chose. I love Maine Anjou bull on Brahman cattle as well as a Hereford bull. Can’t change my cows but can add variety. We did turn heifers out today. Put fly treatment on them yesterday. He has a fantastic temperament. Most of my cows eat out of my hand. Hope to keep that going. Won’t keep a crazy mean cow.
 

Dani

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 4, 2017
Messages
1,442
My friend had beefmasters, which were kept on his parent's property about an hour away from him. They regularly donated to the 4-H kids. I will say just be careful. Since they lived so far away and his Dad was not retired even after 70, it was left up to his mom to go out and feed. It wasn't that they were aggressive, but she did end up getting knocked down a few times. Once even getting her leg broke. They are massive animals. I do remember the time the bull got out and she went from neighbor to neighbor looking for him and thought he was a total loss after weeks of searching. . . That bull ended up MILES down the road. Sorry I don't remember the exact amount she said. That was almost 10 years ago. He ended up selling them all for high dollar to help pay off his sister's cancer treatments. The parent's property is where my friend, his sister chose to go in her final days so she could just watch those big beautiful animals on the hillside pastures.
 

Peanut

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
14,163
Location
Bama
The bull looks as gentle as a lamb but I have no experience with this breeds temperament.

Amen on crazy cows, we've had a few. The is no room for crazy with a small operation. The kicker is that 2 of the best producing cows I've ever had were psycho.

I have a photo I took of one of our crazies. She had twins that year, great mama. I took the photo behind the protection of an electric fence. I turned and was walking away when she charged. She ran over her calves, tore down the fence and hit me from behind like a freight train. I wanted to kill her that day, I was ready to put her in the freezer. Dad talked me out of it, didn't need calves to bottle feed. Can't have crazy around. Funny, those twines were her 4&5th calf. She actually calmed down a little before her next calf. Still didn't trust her for a moment, always carried a heavy staff when I was in the pasture.

Here she is, seconds before she charged, calm, peaceful then instant crazy. She was Charolais with a little Brahma mixed in. She was the younger sister of the bull that put me in the hospital.

Grey twins  (12).jpg
 
Last edited:

Dani

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 4, 2017
Messages
1,442
The bull looks as gentle as a lamb but I have no experience with this breeds temperament.

Amen on crazy cows, we've had a few. The is no room for crazy with a small operation. The kicker is that 2 of the best producing cows I've ever had were psycho.

I have a photo I took of one of our crazies. She had twins that year, great mama. I took the photo behind the protection of an electric fence. I turned and was walking away when she charged. She ran over her calves, tore down the fence and hit me from behind like a freight train. I wanted to kill her that day, I was ready to put her in the freezer. Dad talked me out of it, didn't need to calves to bottle feed. Can't have crazy around. Funny, those twines were her 4&5th calf. She actually calmed down a little before her next calf. Still didn't trust her for a moment, always carried a heavy staff when I was in the pasture.

Here she is, seconds before she charged, calm, peaceful then instant crazy. She was Charolais with a little Brahma mixed in. She was the younger sister of the bull that put me in the hospital.

View attachment 85538
She is beautiful! I don't know if my reaction be "like" or just "wow". I think she would have been added into my freezer. . . especially since it seems to run in the family.
 

Dani

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 4, 2017
Messages
1,442
I knew there was a reason we just stayed with goats .....even our full grown buck wasn't THAT big
I love my goats and even my BIG boys are a handful that takes a couple guys to handle when they are being forced into doing something they are not wanting to do. . Can say that I also LOVE my Jersey cow. Very easy to handle, but will say she has been trained since 6 weeks old.
 

Bacpacker

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 4, 2017
Messages
12,052
Location
East Tn
When we were raising cattle any that had a mean streak was sold or sent on to the stock yard. Uncle raised Herfords and typically they were very calm. Grandpa raised Short Horn Durams (all red cattle but not angus). For the most part they were great animals. We did have a couple that was just nuts. Didn't bother keeping them around long. Dad bought a black angus cow once. Put her in a stall and she kicked the wall out that night. Next day she went to the stock yard.
We don't see any durams around here any more. I'd like to start a herd with them if I ever started back up with cattle. But truthfully, I think Dexter's or Scottish Highlanders would be a better breed for me to fool with. But not likely I'll get back into cattle again
 

Peanut

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 16, 2017
Messages
14,163
Location
Bama
It's killing both dad and I having 45 acres of spring grass and not a single cow on it. I still keep the bull calf in the corral. Dad has brought up buying 20 or 30 bred heifers several times. But he's not able to work cattle and I can't care for that many alone.

So it's nice to see good cattle in somebody's pasture. Thanx @txcatlady

So post some more pics please! :)
 

Bacpacker

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Dec 4, 2017
Messages
12,052
Location
East Tn
It's killing both dad and I having 45 acres of spring grass and not a single cow on it. I still keep the bull calf in the corral. Dad has brought up buying 20 or 30 bred heifers several times. But he's not able to work cattle and I can't care for that many alone.

So it's nice to see good cattle in somebody's pasture. Thanx @txcatlady

So post some more pics please! :)
My grandparents places were both actions off when they died. The bigger one is now split in 3 different areas, mostly for a landscaping, mulch, business. Can't hardly recognize the placeas the same. Uncle was across the highway and his property is now trucking compaines and repair places. Not even recognizable as the farms I grew up working. Breaks my heart everytime I drive by there., Even the spots we used to lease have changed so much.
 

sonya123

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Nov 21, 2020
Messages
565
My grandparents places were both actions off when they died. The bigger one is now split in 3 different areas, mostly for a landscaping, mulch, business. Can't hardly recognize the placeas the same. Uncle was across the highway and his property is now trucking compaines and repair places. Not even recognizable as the farms I grew up working. Breaks my heart everytime I drive by there., Even the spots we used to lease have changed so much.
I wonder about that here. Almost all farmers we know are really old or definitely not any younger than us. Their kids do other stuff . What happens when they die? Are there not going to be any farmers left at all in about 20 years?
Our kids want our place as bug out location, but not as farmers
Even the Amish around here are not really farmers. They mostly make and sell furniture, dog houses and stuff like that. One even has a roofing company. They do have animals but that's mostly for them I think . What happens if nobody wants to grow food anymore?
 

Latest posts

Top