Childs Sewing Machine

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I know very little about sewing machines or little girls for that matter but I would think a Childs machine would be easier for her to use. If she sticks with sewing then after she is older but her a bigger machine.
I kinda thought that, but thought maybe a used regular one would be ok. Was just wondering if anyone has ever had experience with the kid’s versions
 
If you were to buy a girl 8 yrs old a sewing machine. Would you go just a basic adult one or a childs sewing machine? I personally have never tried out a childs machine but thinking for Christmas.
I would find a basic adult sewing machine. You can laugh, but those oldies you see in thrift stores are often far superior to what is in the stores. I used to get old machines at yard sales and get them cleaned up and adjust the tension etc and sell them to 4Hers to learn to sew on (or even gave a couple away). The old machines are workhorses and far less finicky for learning. To this day I prefer the older machines. Some of the better brands that are more easily repaired if necessary: singer, white, new home and my mind just went blank. Sorry, it’s about my bedtime.
ETA: my experience with the newer kids machines is that they are “rattly” and don’t offer a very nice stitch.
A good machine can last a lifetime.
 
I would find a basic adult sewing machine. You can laugh, but those oldies you see in thrift stores are often far superior to what is in the stores. I used to get old machines at yard sales and get them cleaned up and adjust the tension etc and sell them to 4Hers to learn to sew on (or even gave a couple away). The old machines are workhorses and far less finicky for learning. To this day I prefer the older machines. Some of the better brands that are more easily repaired if necessary: singer, white, new home and my mind just went blank. Sorry, it’s about my bedtime.
ETA: my experience with the newer kids machines is that they are “rattly” and don’t offer a very nice stitch.
A good machine can last a lifetime.
I totally agree with this.
I'm wondering if you are considering this for a Christmas gift, and want to purchase a new machine?

I would be wary of sewing machines made for children. Actually, many machines made now are plastic and have problems. While you can get newer machines with more options and technology, a simple machine that sews a straight seam and a zig-zag stitch is good for a beginner.

The machine that I learned to sew on when I was 9 was a Singer Featherweight. It is a smaller machine. These were made in the 1940s and are metal and still going. They only did a straight stitch. That machine was what I used to sew most of my clothing until I graduated from h.s.

I bought my first machine in the 1970's when I was leaving for college. It was a Singer and made of metal, a very basic machine. When I took it to some class 20 years later, people told me how lucky I was to have a heavy duty machine. It was one of the least expensive machines they made at that time. It still runs, but I have purchased a couple of machines that can do more kinds of stitches now.
 
At that age, my mother and grandmother were teaching me to sew by hand. I wasn’t permitted to use their machines until I was 10or 11. My mom’s had a knee pedal for controlling speed—easy for me to use. At 12, my school had home ec and sewing class. Those Singers had finger guards by the needles and in retrospect were a good idea.

My Brother machine has both a foot pedal and a start/stop button. The foot pedal might be too hard to use but the start/stop button may be easier. Mine also has a variable speed slider switch which would be a help for a little one.
 
A adult sew machine will work, but child machine cost less & has limits.
DW learned on her mothers machine & made clothes in high school.
Her friend ask her where she bought her outfit, she said she made it & no believed her.
Never knew if it was because her clothes looked so stylish or they were that dumb.
 
If you were to buy a girl 8 yrs old a sewing machine. Would you go just a basic adult one or a childs sewing machine? I personally have never tried out a childs machine but thinking for Christmas.
Buy one you would use! Teach her to use it.
 
I agree! She'll be able to use it as an adult as well, if she keeps sewing. It will also have a better resale value.
yup.

Judging by my sister and mother, you are never a seamstress until you you have run a needle through your finger a time or two.

I may have sown more if my father had never acquired a Dremel tool. I have plenty of scars to prove it. ;)

Generally speaking:

Most projects worth doing aren't done without some blood being shed.

Ben
 
yup.

Judging by my sister and mother, you are never a seamstress until you you have run a needle through your finger a time or two.

I may have sown more if my father had never acquired a Dremel tool. I have plenty of scars to prove it. ;)

Generally speaking:

Most projects worth doing aren't done without some blood being shed.

Ben
LOL! This is true. The scars have stories!
 
yup.

Judging by my sister and mother, you are never a seamstress until you you have run a needle through your finger a time or two.

I may have sown more if my father had never acquired a Dremel tool. I have plenty of scars to prove it. ;)

Generally speaking:

Most projects worth doing aren't done without some blood being shed.

Ben
If my experience means anything, it takes more than a blood sacrifice to appease the sewing gods. No seamstress here.
 
Never had a child's sewing machine but didn't start sewing until I was 10 or 11 and then on a Singer adult machine. I still have a Singer I bought in the 80s. Works fine, nothing fancy. Taught my kids how to sew on it, even one of the boys wanted to know how to sew, making stuff the likes of what our @Frodo here makes.
 
Never had a child's sewing machine but didn't start sewing until I was 10 or 11 and then on a Singer adult machine. I still have a Singer I bought in the 80s. Works fine, nothing fancy. Taught my kids how to sew on it, even one of the boys wanted to know how to sew, making stuff the likes of what our @Frodo here makes.
After my Mom Died I was given all the old sewing machines I wondered what to do with them, I actually sewed the first time just to verify the machine worked so I could sell it. But. I made a range bag instead
After that I never looked back
 
Personally I gave Roo one of my machines when she was 10. I learned to sew on my mom's antique so Roo learned on mine.
 
.....Look for an older, basic, inexpensive adult machine....
That was what I had for my craft machine... It also got used by a couple 8-10 year old neighbor girls...

Yes... Getting fingers pinch under the wing nut that holds the needle in the moving arm is a valuable lesson in paying attention to the whole process that is going on..
 
I kinda thought that, but thought maybe a used regular one would be ok. Was just wondering if anyone has ever had experience with the kid’s versions
I have 4 kid version sewing machines.
And 5 adult sewing machines.
I am teaching my grand daughter to sew on the Singer (kid version), I learned to sew on.
I have my grandmother's treadle which I also sewn on.
When she's ready we will use one of mine adult sewing machines.
I have enough machines each of my grandchildren will get one when they're ready.
 
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