Clothes Hangers

Discussion in 'Product reviews' started by Peanut, Jan 31, 2019.

Help Support Homesteading Forum by donating using the link above.
  1. Jan 31, 2019 #1

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2017
    Messages:
    2,017
    Likes Received:
    10,984
    I haven’t purchased an adequate clothes hanger in decades. For years all I have found are flimsy pieces of junk that would barely hold up a dress shirt much less a heavy winter shirt.

    After a few weeks of research, I discovered most hangers sold at wally world, target and such places are made from 14-gauge wire.

    I found these on amazon made from 12-gauge wire. They will hold up a winter coat.

    A slight problem, just under the hook where the wire is twisted together… There was a sharp edge on some of them. I used a can of Flex-Seal to coat the twist.

    When I bought them a few weeks ago the price was $23 for a pack of 100 hangers. I noticed today the price was $30.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B075Y86YW3/?tag=skimlinks_replacement-20


    hangars _v1.jpg
     
  2. Jan 31, 2019 #2

    Sewingcreations15

    Sewingcreations15

    Sewingcreations15

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Messages:
    2,235
    Likes Received:
    13,138
    @Peanut they look a lot sturdier than the thinner wire coat hangers for sure.

    We find that these are better for hanging coats on as they hold the shoulders better and are thicker from front to back, but just our opinion -

    coat hanger.jpg If the thicker wire ones work then keep using them :) . We have a saying in our home which is use whatever works and does the job with the least amount of money spent.
     
    joel, timmie, MoBookworm1957 and 7 others like this.
  3. Jan 31, 2019 #3

    Caribou

    Caribou

    Caribou

    Time traveler Neighbor Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    2,186
    Likes Received:
    11,121
    My grandfather took two of the cheap hangers, scotch taped them in a couple spots, and then covered them in whatever yarn he could get his hands on. He was mostly chair bound and this kept him busy. My cousins and I wound up with hundreds of these. I love these hangars mostly due to the fact that he made them but they are excellent hangars as well.

    P.S. My wooden hangars are excellent as well.
     
  4. Jan 31, 2019 #4

    dademoss

    dademoss

    dademoss

    Specializing Nonspecialist Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2017
    Messages:
    664
    Likes Received:
    3,532
    Location:
    Dunlap Station, Ohio
    For coats and jackets, it's wood hangers for me. Shirts get the plastic hangers, sweaters get folded on a shelf.
     
  5. Feb 1, 2019 #5

    zoomzoom

    zoomzoom

    zoomzoom

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    5,021
    Same for me. I'm pretty sure we've throw away most of the regular metal hangers.
     
  6. Feb 1, 2019 #6

    Cascadian

    Cascadian

    Cascadian

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2017
    Messages:
    291
    Likes Received:
    1,362
    Yep, wire hangers are for cooking marshmallows and hotdogs.
     
  7. Feb 1, 2019 #7

    Caribou

    Caribou

    Caribou

    Time traveler Neighbor Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    2,186
    Likes Received:
    11,121
    OMG! I always keep several around. Getting keys out of a locked car, making a mouse trap, welding, securing something that needs a heavy tie wire...
     
  8. Feb 1, 2019 #8

    zoomzoom

    zoomzoom

    zoomzoom

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    727
    Likes Received:
    5,021
    Never welded with a hanger but for the other things you mentioned, I reach for a roll of wire. Much easier and smaller than hangers to store in the shop. Small is safety wire like what's used on aircraft, medium is electric fence wire and heavy is high-tensile fence wire.
     
  9. Feb 1, 2019 #9

    dademoss

    dademoss

    dademoss

    Specializing Nonspecialist Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2017
    Messages:
    664
    Likes Received:
    3,532
    Location:
    Dunlap Station, Ohio
    Same here, metal hangers are in the workshop hanging around waiting for their time to shine :)
     
  10. Feb 1, 2019 #10

    Caribou

    Caribou

    Caribou

    Time traveler Neighbor Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    2,186
    Likes Received:
    11,121
    Sometimes it comes down to using what you have. Hangers would not be my first choice but sometimes are my only choice.

    Trying to fish out a dropped washer. Once I had a light fixture that was too high and above a stair so a ladder wasn't practicable. A coat hanger made a great lightbulb grabber to extract the burnt bulb and install a new one. I left it in the house when I moved. the original hook portion was left in place to hang it in the closet.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
  11. Feb 1, 2019 #11

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    18,744
    The only time I have wire hangers is when I have dry cleaning, and that is rare. I have replaced most of the hangers in my house with plastic ones and have been using them for about 20 years. I do have some padded ones and wooden ones that are better for coats in the coat closet and for finer clothing.
     
  12. Feb 1, 2019 #12

    Sewingcreations15

    Sewingcreations15

    Sewingcreations15

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2017
    Messages:
    2,235
    Likes Received:
    13,138
    Like @Caribou we keep a few of the weaker wire coat hangers for a backup for tie wire in case we run out and as stated good for getting into cars with in the older cars if you have locked your keys inside. They are also good for threading up electrical and conduit wire through from under the house here amongst many other uses.
     
  13. Feb 1, 2019 #13

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2017
    Messages:
    2,017
    Likes Received:
    10,984
    Everyone will think this a bit odd... The big belts in a round hay baler... There is usually at least one splice to hold the ends of a belt together. A small metal pin, as long as the belt is wide is used to hold the belt together. Dad and I have used the long section of a clothes hanger as the pin for years. They work great.

    Actually, that's where all our good hangers from years ago went to. They got used up in a hay baler. ;)


    Photo of a belt, you can see each end to the wire used as a pin, they are bent to keep the pin in.

    Baler belt.jpg
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
    LadyLocust, Terri9630, timmie and 5 others like this.
  14. Feb 1, 2019 #14

    Bacpacker

    Bacpacker

    Bacpacker

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2017
    Messages:
    1,325
    Likes Received:
    5,266
    Location:
    East Tn
    Great idea. I wouldn't have thought they would last very well. Thought them to be too soft and wear quickly.
     
  15. Feb 1, 2019 #15

    MoBookworm1957

    MoBookworm1957

    MoBookworm1957

    MoBookworm1957 Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2018
    Messages:
    1,553
    Likes Received:
    7,746
    Location:
    Missouri
    Make flower pot hangers out of them hang over the fence.
    Takes several to bend into right shape so that they are strong enough to hold flower pot.
    Hanger end goes over the top of fence.
     
    Weedygarden, timmie, Peanut and 2 others like this.
  16. Feb 1, 2019 #16

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2017
    Messages:
    2,017
    Likes Received:
    10,984
    US steel mills started closing in the early to mid 80's. Clothes hangers from before that time will last 2 sometimes 3 hay seasons. After that time... not so much. Hangers from the late 80's/90's will wear out in one season.

    Old baler belts will have more than one joint. Some of our old belts have as many as 3 joints. The metal pressed into the belt ends at joints is called "lacing". It's a 2 man job to splice belts, add lacing, take out bad sections of a belt etc.

    Meaning... over the course of 15 to 18 years we went through a lot of clothes hangers.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2019
  17. Feb 1, 2019 #17

    Bacpacker

    Bacpacker

    Bacpacker

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2017
    Messages:
    1,325
    Likes Received:
    5,266
    Location:
    East Tn
    Peanut, I never worked on Round bale balers, so no expereince at all with that type work. We always worked with square bales. Twine in much different from the belts. Biggest trouble we had was when the feds cut out hemp twine in the early=mid 70's and the twine wouldn't hold a good knot or keep from breaking when you had a good tight bale you couldn't handle easily. Well other than conveyor belts where I worked. Same type lacing. But the Co. bought factory parts to repair them so not as much make do as a farmer has to do. Metal changing over the years don't surprise me.
     
  18. Feb 2, 2019 #18

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    18,744
    When I worked for my uncle on a haying crew, one summer in my much younger days in the 1970's, the alfalfa we were putting up was baled into the round bales. I didn't even realize then why the bales of my childhood, the rectangular prism shaped bales, were no longer being made. I think those balers were fairly simple and straight forward, but evidently missing the most important component, the baling twine caused them to be worthless. My job was to run the windrower (swather).
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2019
    Bacpacker, MoBookworm1957 and Caribou like this.
  19. Feb 2, 2019 #19

    joel

    joel

    joel

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2017
    Messages:
    757
    Likes Received:
    3,027
    I would like wooden hangers if the cheap metal did not make the cut.
    I do have a few plastic copies of the wooden ones, came with the suits.
     
    Weedygarden and Caribou like this.
  20. Mar 11, 2019 #20

    LadyLocust

    LadyLocust

    LadyLocust

    Awesome Friend Neighbor

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2019
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    226
    Location:
    Washington
    A couple years ago, I went through the closet and 1) decluttered about 1/3 of the contents and 2) changed to wooden hangers and got rid of plastic and wire. I haven't bought any of the hangers new - mostly thrift shops, often free if they have been crocheted around. The gals said those usually go in the garbage as nobody wants them. I take them cut the yarn off and keep the good wooden hanger that hides within. I've since decreased my wardrobe by about another 1/3 so now have more hangers than I need which makes it nice as there are a few spares for in the coat closet.
     
  21. Mar 12, 2019 #21

    SheepDog

    SheepDog

    SheepDog

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    1,554
    Likes Received:
    7,472
    Location:
    SE Washington State
    My wife likes the heavy plastic hangers and was going to throw the metal ones out. I kept them in my shop and use them when I need light springs or tools that can be made out of them. We had a bar-b-que (that's a barbee for you Aussies) and needed marsh mallow roasting sticks. It took me just a few minutes to make a set of skewers that I now keep hung in the garage. She never says anything about the stuff I keep around for future use.
     
  22. Mar 12, 2019 #22

    joel

    joel

    joel

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2017
    Messages:
    757
    Likes Received:
    3,027
    OR weld a muffler.
     
    Weedygarden and SheepDog like this.
  23. Mar 13, 2019 #23

    SheepDog

    SheepDog

    SheepDog

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    1,554
    Likes Received:
    7,472
    Location:
    SE Washington State
    The problem with using hangers for welding is that the hanger is a poor grade of spring steel. It gets iffy when combined with other steels. It will work on mild steel but is problematic when used on alloy steels unless it is tempered following the weld process. You also have to sand the black enamel off the wire to get it clean enough to weld.
    I have used it to make pinch cocks for siphon bottles and test tube tongs. I have even used it to replace springs in guns. I had to make a spring for an old bolt action 20 gauge shotgun to get it back in working condition. With proper heat treating it is as good as you need for a lot of things.
     
    Weedygarden likes this.

Share This Page