Cooking with no pan

Discussion in 'HIking, Camping, Backpacking' started by JAC, Jan 9, 2019.

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  1. Jan 9, 2019 #1

    JAC

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    Boyscouts taught me how to cook hamburger on coals on a leaf.
    pat out hamburger patty then put slices of potato on each side of the patty. Sit on leaf on coals only. No flames. Allow to cook. leaf burns everywhere except where the potato is.

    You can also cook eggs like this put in a half of an orange peel. Slice orange in half, scoop out orange slices. Crack egg and put inside orange peel half and sit on coals.

    Note. If you cook with a pan on an open flame or coals you can cut down on the sooty cleanup by covering the underside of your pan with liquid dish soap.
     
  2. Jan 9, 2019 #2

    Meerkat

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    Jac, you can also cook on a stick too. I wonder how that dish soap on a pan in the house would work, may have a smell inside but sounds like a good idea I do need to clean bottom of my pans. Fry pan bottoms are ignored here.
     
  3. Jan 9, 2019 #3

    Sparky_D

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    Back in the BOY Scouts, we used to cook biscuits on a stick.

    Whittle off the bark, toast the bare wood over the flames to cook off any residual sap, then wrap thick Bisquick batter around the end and cook over the coals until done. Slide the cooked biscuit off the stick and fill with butter and/or jam or lunch meat and cheese, or whatever. It was our original "Hot Pocket".

    Once, we did corn dogs too. Same stick prep as above, but spear the hotdog on the stick, then cover it with cornbread batter (we used Jiffy since it was cheap). Not an exact corndog, but in the woods with mustard, it was close enough, lol.
     
  4. Jan 9, 2019 #4

    Meerkat

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    Neato Sparky. never thought or heard of that one.
     
  5. Jan 9, 2019 #5

    dademoss

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    Way back when it was boy scouts, we used to either cook on a flat rock over the fire (hamburgers and bacon are ok, forget fried eggs :p) or do "hobo dinners", in a foil packet (Hamburger, potatoes, onions). spam and hot dogs on a stick, sometimes we got fancy and did the biscuits :)

    Can of soup or beans was popular too, open and heat over the fire
     
  6. Jan 10, 2019 #6

    backlash

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    I am surprised nobody has mentioned cooking over a camp fire in a brown paper bag.
     
  7. Jan 10, 2019 #7

    Meerkat

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    :D
     
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  8. Jan 10, 2019 #8

    Meerkat

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    When I was a kid we just opened up potted meat or sardines and crackers and just watched the fire burn or heated by it. And of course sometimes had hot dogs on a stick.
     
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  9. Mar 14, 2019 #9

    LadyLocust

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    I had goat one time - wrapped in leaves then burlap, thrown in a pit of coals and covered. Leave it and come back several hours later to some delicious grub.
    (There were probably some spices added but I was just an eater not a cooker so wouldn’t know what they were.)
     
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  10. Mar 14, 2019 #10

    JAC

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    Sounds similar to Kalua Pig cooked in an Imu.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalua

    https://www.tastingkauai.com/making-kalua-pork-home-imu/

    Making Kalua Pork at Home or in an Imu
    By Marta on March 28, 2012 in Culture, To Table: Ono Eats
    [​IMG]

    Hanalei Taro & Juice Co. Plate Lunch. Photo by Daniel Lane

    Living on Kauai has made me a kalua pork connoisseur. When done right, the tender meat is infused with smoke and salt. Fat melts into the strands, and adds an unbeatable flavor. As Emeril Lagasse says, “Pork fat rules!”

    One of my favorite comfort foods is a bowl of steamed rice with kalua pork, cabbage and poi. The combination is ubiquitous on the islands, and you can find kalua pork at luaus, grocery stores and restaurants, but most of it is not true kalua pork.

    [​IMG]
    Cutting up banana leaves and trunks for the imu. Daniel Lane photo

    The literal translation of kalua, is “to bake in the ground oven,” known in Hawaii as an imu. It’s a luxury to dig a six-foot long, 4-foot wide, and 3-foot deep pit in the middle of your property, so most restaurants make it in the oven with satisfactory results.

    Having kalua directly from an imu is a special treat, and unless you have friends with connections, the only way you can enjoy it at home, is to buy kalua-like pork from a grocery store. I have seen two brands in the frozen section. One is in a bright-yellow 12 ounce container called “Keoki’s Kalua Brand Pork”, and one is in a bright-pink container called “Ono Ono Kalua Brand Pork”. This will do in a pinch, and we prefer the Ono Ono Brand.



    [​IMG]
    Daniel Lane photo

    While covering M & H Kaneshiro Farms for the Kauai Grown campaign, Valerie Kaneshiro asked us to photograph her friend Kimo making kalua pork with two of her 300 pound sows

    I have to warn you, these pictures may make you squeamish, but I believe in food transparency. Too many people don’t know what it takes to get real food to the table, and that’s kind of the point of this blog. If you eat meat, an animal had to be raised and slaughtered. That’s just the way it is. If you’re a vegan or vegetarian, you shouldn’t finish reading this post.

    I appreciate that Valerie raises her charges with care and attention, because life matters. Factory farmed meat and fish have not been raised this way, and you will be more than squeamish if you take the time to learn where it does come from.

    [​IMG]
    Daniel Lane photo

    By the time Dan and I make the hour-long drive to the Westside, the pigs are delivered, and killed with a quick shot to the head. One pig lay on a table in the shade, a lady brushing at flies with a handful of ever swishing ti leaves.

    In the imu, puka rocks top a bed of hot kiawe coals, sending heat shimmeres against a baby blue sky.

    [​IMG]
    Cutting the joints down to fit into the baskets. Daniel Lane photo



    The smell of burnt hair filled the air as the skin was thoroughly cleaned. First with a blow torch, then hard scraping with sharp knives. After that, a long, swift slice from the neck to the hind legs. The men reach inside and spill the guts into a plastic lined trash barrel.







    [​IMG]
    Slathering the pig with Hanapepe sea salt. Daniel Lane photo



    The pigs are cut in half so they will cook more evenly, and deep slices are made into the skin and muscle. This is packed with Hanapepe sea salt. The men lift the carcasses into wire baskets lined with tinfoil and ti leaves.

    [​IMG]
    Daniel Lane photo





    Puka rocks pulled from the fire are placed in the cavity with long, sturdy tongs. Ti leaves to cover, and tinfoil tucked all around.

    A forklift carries the pig-leaden baskets to the imu, where they are covered in banana leaves and crushed trunks, adding flavor and moisture to the finished product. Heavy, wet tarps are laid over, followed by a plastic tarp. The edges are buried in dirt. Soon, steam raises the plastic into a taut dome. The meat is left to slowly cook for the rest of the day, and into the next.

    We drive back in the morning, our mouths watering in hopeful anticipation. As we pull into the driveway, the tantalizing smell of cooked meat fills the air. The men get to work, uncovering and forklifting the treasure out.

    [​IMG]
    The last stages of kalua pork. Daniel Lane photo

    The crates are set on tables, and everyone plunges their hands into the hot flesh. The bones and miscellaneous bits of skin and fat are removed. Another generous helping of Hanapepe sea salt is mixed in. Long, ropy strands of succulent meat, extending about 6 inches, are cut into bite-sized pieces. Gallon freezer bags are filled and stacked.

    It was near Christmas, and one pig, portioned into 3-pound bags went to Kimo, who gave the meat to family and friends. The other cooked pig was for Valerie, who did the same. As we were leaving, Kimo called Dan over.

    “Here,” he said. “this is for you guys.”

    It’s the end of March, and we ran out of kalua four weeks ago. So I make a satisfactory substitute at home.

    Crock-Pot “Kalua” Pork
    2 tablespoons Hawaiian sea salt
    1, 6 pound pork butt
    1 tablespoon liquid smoke

    Pierce pork all over. Rub salt then liquid smoke over meat. Place roast in a slow cooker. Cover, and cook on low for 16 to 20 hours, turning once during cooking time. Remove meat from slow cooker, and shred, adding drippings as needed to moisten.
     
  11. Mar 14, 2019 #11

    joel

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    A flat rock,an onion instead of a orange.
    All vegetables, fruit, nuts can be eaten raw & on the move.
    Would wire mesh on a stick be a pan or would it be a no pan ideal, for bread or fish cooking.
     
  12. Mar 14, 2019 #12

    LadyLocust

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    @JAC. I had some at a luau once. I forgot about that- it was good!
     
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  13. Mar 14, 2019 #13

    JAC

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    I went to a genuine "Hawaiian Luau" once. It was at a Hawaiian family's home. Nothing like the one you would go to at Don Ho's or a hotel in Waikiki. The difference is it begins the day before when the hole is dug, and the fire is started and the rocks begin heating. There is a lot of drinking all night long and then the next day after the pig is pulled from the Imu and eaten then there is much more drinking then there is the big violent fight between family members and then the police come and then the family fights the police and then everyone goes to the hospital and jail then home to sleep it off.
     
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  14. Mar 14, 2019 #14

    Weedygarden

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    Peruvians cook Pachamanca, in a pit of hot rocks. Pachamanca is party food, cooked for celebrations. I had Pachamanca once, for someone's college graduation celebration. The girl's mother was Peruvian and her family cooked the meal. It was interesting. A variety of foods were wrapped in foil and put into the pit, which was then covered by a protective layer and dirt. It was many years ago. They didn't have foil when Pachamanca was first cooked. No, they used leaves.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pachamanca
    Pachamanca (from Quechua pacha "earth", manka "pot") is a traditional Peruvian dish based on the baking, with the aid of hot stones (the earthen oven is known as a huatia), of lamb, mutton, pork, chicken or guinea pig, marinated in spices. Other Andean produce, such as potato, green lima beans or "habas", sweet potato, occasionally cassava or yucca, and humitas (sweet treat) as well as ears of corn, tamale and chili, is included in the baking.

    The dish is essentially made in the central Peruvian Andes in three main regions: 1) The upper Huallaga valley, in Huánuco and Pasco vicinity, where it is made with pork and seasoned with chincho, a local herb; 2) in the Mantaro valley and neighboring area around cities like Huancayo, Tarma and Jauja; they use lamb and a different seasoning; and 3) in several places of Ayacucho department. In the Peruvian Amazonia, the southern and northern Andes, and the mostly desertic coast the dish is uncommon due to the lack of firewood or the type of stones needed without any content of sulphur. Meat is wrapped in marmaquilla or chincho leaves before being put in this kind of earthen stove.
     
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  15. Mar 14, 2019 #15

    JAC

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    Weedy I'm so glad you mentioned the part about the foil cause you know I was gonna ask about ancient peruvian foil.
     
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  16. Mar 14, 2019 #16

    Weedygarden

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    You know, things evolve, and in some instances, they devolve!
     
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  17. Mar 14, 2019 #17

    backlash

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    We had K
    Sounds like fun. We went to a real luau in 1966 when my Dad was working in Hawaii. I don't remember any fights but man those guys could put away the beer. The women did a fair job too.
    We had kaula pork and cabbage Hawaiian style mac salad and a side of lumpia for supper on Tuesday.
    Only issue is finding the lumpia wrappers. There are tortillas sold at every store in town but just try asking for lumpia wrappers from a store clerk the speaks English as a second language. Best we could do is egg roll wrappers. Close but not the same.
     
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  18. Mar 14, 2019 #18

    Weedygarden

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    My cousin used to get this at a deli when she lived in Oregon. I had never heard of it before, but yum!
    I did not realize that lumpia wrappers were different than egg roll wrappers. I have made many egg rolls in my life and have heard of lumpia and know they are Filipino. The last time I made egg rolls, I was looking for gluten free egg roll wrappers. No luck!

    I just found this recipe for making lumpia wrappers. I didn't realize they were made with eggs.

    https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/lumpia-wrappers-352970

    YIELD: Makes 8 or more wrappers
    TOTAL TIME: 20 minutes
    INGREDIENTS
    1 cup flour
    1 egg
    Corn, grapeseed, or other neutral oil as needed
     
  19. Mar 14, 2019 #19

    JAC

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    Hawaiians always tried to make me eat.
    "Eat skinny Haole boy" they would say.
     
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  20. Mar 15, 2019 #20

    joel

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    Not just Hawaiian, all the women in my life did that.
    I went to 4 Christmas dinners, 4 Thanksgiving dinners, for years.
    Now everyone say diet.
     
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  21. Mar 17, 2019 #21

    Flight

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    I have never tried this myself but a quick search said using tinfoil will work. Something I will have to try.
     
  22. Mar 17, 2019 #22

    Tank-Girl

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    On mustering camps we used the blade of a shovel over a fire to cook meat.

    I've also wrapped fish in wet grass then paper bark and then a layer of sealed clay, scrape back the ashed
    laid the clay lump down and covered back up with hot ashes and coals until the clay was baked hard.

    I've put whole sweet potatoes into a hot ash bed and then split it open wide once they were cooked through and soft and then
    poured sweetened condensed milk into the wide spit. Yum.

    I've done damper twisties on a stick over the coals and when they were done pulled them off and poured golden syrup
    down the hole the stick left.
     
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  23. Mar 20, 2019 #23

    joel

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    We use to butcher & grill/roast/ BBQ pigs, but I never done it in a pit.
    I have 6 inch X 12 inch expanded sheet metal plate( diamond shaped holes in metal), it is stainless steel, so never rust.
    I use this for camp cooking,with a stand or 3 rocks, works great & is light weight.
     
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