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Crossvine

Discussion in 'Natural Remedies' started by Peanut, Nov 20, 2019.

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  1. Nov 20, 2019 #1

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Awesome Friend Neighbor HCL Supporter

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    Crossvine… aka – Bignonia capreolata – It’s an “Adaptogen” a group of herbal plants located worldwide with over 200 species. Crossvine grows in the southcentral US.

    Growing locations per USDA

    https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=BICA

    Growing information from Dave's Garden

    https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1789/

    For this post I reference David Winston’s book “Adaptogens Herbs for strength, Stamina and Stress Relief”… listed here https://www.homesteadingforum.org/threads/herbal-medicine-books-peanut-recommends.6745/

    Several other authors in this list also write about Crossvine. Tommie Bass taught crossvine to Darryl Patton who writes about it in “Mountain Medicine”. Darryl taught it to me, you will see later why it is such an important plant to me personally. David Winston and Phyllis Light also taught me a few things about crossvine.

    It’s mentioned by Matthew Wood in one of his books and it’s listed in “A Reference Guide to Medicinal Plants” recommended by @Grizzleyette___Adams

    The Cherokee of North Carolina used crossvine and taught it to early settlers. Other native tribes also used it.

    Outside the southeastern US and a handful of people not much is known about Crossvine. However, a great deal is known and written about “Adaptogens” by all the authors in my list.

    A quote from David’s book…

    Adaptogens and Stress

    Adaptogens modulate our responses to stress (physical, environmental and emotional) and help regulate and support the interconnected neuroendocrine and immune systems. This re-regulation of an unbalanced or highly stressed system is achieved by actions of metabolic regulators such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis.

    Adaptogenic herbs support the entire neuroendocrine system, in particular adrenal function, thus counteracting the adverse effects of stress. They allow our bodies to sustain an adaptive response and minimize the damage that a prolonged stress response can cause.


    A lot of big words but they are NOT talking about the stress of an overdue powerbill or the mother-in-law coming to visit.

    Adaptogens help with prolonged major stressors, like those faced when shtf, the world falls apart. Listening @phideaux ? Major stress on our bodies due to major illness or injury, like surgery. For folks like me with CFS or ME adaptogens prevent or reduce the effects of an adrenaline crash.

    It’s only in recent years that I have come to realize the importance of adaptogens to preppers, far more than plants that will heal the flu or a cold or a broken bone.

    Adaptogens help our entire body and mind… and its response to anything that impacts us adversely. They are one group of plants that every prepper should know… I highly recommend David Winston’s book… Adaptogens.

    A few pics of crossvine…

    Pics 1 & 2… crossvine growing up a pine and then a hardwood. The leaves appear in groups of 4, 2 on each side of a vine.

    crossvine 01.jpg crossvine 02.jpg

    Pic 3… The last time Darryl and I went out and gathered crossvine together. If I’m going to drive a couple hundred miles I’ll bring back a truck load!

    crossvine 03.jpg

    I dehydrated the vines, leaves and stems then vacuum sealed it in mason jars for making tea. Crossvine in tincture form works great (standard 1 to 2 ratio).

    I just really like the taste of crossvine tea, beats Lipton all to heck. Mix 2 cups of dried crossvine in 2 quarts of water, boil on low for 10 minutes, then strain out plant material. I usually sweeten it with 2 tbs of honey. I drink 1/2 cup of tea twice daily… Pic 4

    crossvine 04.jpg

    Pot luck dinner at Mrs. Phyllis Light’s house with David Winston and friends. A lot of plant wisdom in her house that night! Pic 5…

    crossvine 05.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 20, 2019
  2. Dec 4, 2019 at 5:40 PM #2

    Grizzleyette___Adams

    Grizzleyette___Adams

    Grizzleyette___Adams

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  3. Dec 4, 2019 at 6:33 PM #3

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Peanut

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    Another difference between crossvine and trumpet creeper aside from leaves that look nothing alike... Crossvine blooms in early spring, March early April. Trumpet creeper blooms in late July and August. The article is correct, trumpet creeper is very aggressive. I don't want it on my farm, it's as bad as kudzu!
     
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