DNA

Discussion in 'Prepping Talk' started by Weedygarden, Sep 24, 2018.

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  1. Sep 24, 2018 #1

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

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    I have never knowingly had my DNA tested or analyzed. I have my reasons, but I do know several of my relatives have. I think that even though I haven't had mine tested (knowingly), knowing that relatives have had theirs done still exposes me.

    DNA has recently solved some unsolved crimes, and my guess is that in the future, it will become really big in the crime solving tool kit.

    I did hear that all babies born in hospitals are being DNA tested, for a variety of reasons, disease and genetic health predictors.

    Have you had your DNA analyzed? Would you? Or would you avoid it?
     
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  2. Sep 24, 2018 #2

    Amish Heart

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    Nope I wouldn't. I don't know any of my relatives who have, either.
    I know our last two daughters have, without my permission, when they were born in California 1992 and 1994. It was routine.
     
  3. Sep 24, 2018 #3

    Patchouli

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    DNA ...I was excited about it when it first was being advertised and thought I would when I could afford it. Now, not so much.
    It is just one more deposit for the data bank on your name. Listen to me, paranoid much? lol
    I could be more open minded and say who cares? I have nothing to hide. Or do i and don't know it?
    My main interest would be to see what it indicates my nationalities or origin are in percentages. What I find interesting is that every sibling is going to have different results and they do suggest that your eldest brother or uncle get the test for reliable results. I suppose that has to do with patriarchal lineage and I don't know if I understand enough of it to keep writing.
     
  4. Sep 24, 2018 #4

    Meerkat

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    No DNA done of anyone in my family that I know of but now y'all are saying all babies are getting it done, well in that case guess lots of them have it on record.
     
  5. Sep 24, 2018 #5

    Amish Heart

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    Yep. I'm paranoid. No DNA testing, no chip implants, no anything. I would say that would REALLY fall under "a woman's right to choose", don't ya think?
     
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  6. Sep 24, 2018 #6

    Weedygarden

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    It is why I don't want to have mine done. The real challenge is how many people in my family who have had it done.
     
  7. Sep 24, 2018 #7

    JAC

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    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018...ys-julian-assange-last-pre-blackout-interview

    This generation being born now… is the last free generation. You are born and either immediately or within say a year you are known globally. Your identity in one form or another –coming as a result of your idiotic parents plastering your name and photos all over Facebook or as a result of insurance applications or passport applications– is known to all major world powers.

    A small child now in some sense has to negotiate its relationship with all the major world powers… It puts us in a very different position. Very few technically capable people are able to live apart, to choose to live apart, to choose to go their own way,” he added. “It smells a bit like totalitarianism – in some way. -Julian Assange
     
  8. Sep 24, 2018 #8

    CrackbottomLouis

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    I did but my DNA was already in the system anyway so no harm no foul. Heard rumors of the genetic testing finding disease probabilities that would adversely effect insurance rates but I dont think we are there yet and its bs. They probably collect DNA from kids in kindergarten like they used to get our fingerprints these days but no kids so not sure. Wouldnt be surprised though. Ive heard, but unsure how true, gov agencies cant take a sample from you if it's against your religion. So telling them you're jehovah's witness is a hail mary if you're ever put on the spot and dont want to comply.
     
  9. Sep 24, 2018 #9

    snappy1

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    No DNA test or chip for me. Don't have much family left to have it done.
     
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  10. Sep 24, 2018 #10

    Patchouli

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    I was going to post that over the weekend but was unsure of where and how. We talked about it at dinner last night.
    The one thing I can get my kids and husband talking about --- of all things --- is politics and government! Never would have thought. None of us see eye to eye but agree in other areas that surprise me.
    I'm trying to keep an open mind...not impressed with our choices...
     
  11. Sep 25, 2018 #11

    tiffanysgallery

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    my DNA is on file with the government. I'm a Veteran and worked were it was necessary. No chip.
     
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  12. Sep 25, 2018 #12

    The Lazy L

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    Our grandchildren were DNA analyzed. There was a 5% chance of...and the parents said enough with the analyzing and testing.

    DNA for crime solving IMHO is right up there with the realization that everyone has a unique fingerprint.

    Thought about having my DNA tested just to see where my ancestors originated from. Online reviews lead me to believe too much guess work was involved. I'll wait until the accuracy improves and the price decreases.
     
  13. Sep 25, 2018 #13

    Weedygarden

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    I have done enough genealogy work, back to the late 1600's in some lines, to know where I come from.
     
  14. Sep 25, 2018 #14

    Meerkat

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    Maybe not but you won't be allowed to have a car,drive, have bank account or SSI either. In other words your history. Any ID they give you will basically be the same as the Real ID anyway.
    I know I'm right in the middle of it since I went to renew my license.

    I loved this show, didn't know I was fixing to be in it in real life though.:ghostly:This series cost $24.00 on Youtube now!

     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2018
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  15. Sep 25, 2018 #15

    Patchouli

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    Finger scan ID
    Eye scan ID
    Chip scan ID
    DNA
    Cradle to grave agenda
    We can come up with fantastic technology but kids in retail don't know how to give back correct change, even though the machine tells them what to give.

    Some ancestry to a certain point is already done. You just need to link up. We're all related to royalty somewhere. I've got Thor in my line. Lol
     
  16. Sep 25, 2018 #16

    Weedygarden

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    One of the things about DNA would be to discover who carries what defect or not. One of my uncles married a woman whose family has the muscular dystrophy gene (?). One of their children died from MD. All the potential carriers were tested and so far, it appears that no one will ever pass it on.

    We're all related to royalty?? It seems that most people want to be related to or descended from royalty. This is such a common discussion in all the genealogy groups that I participate in. Me? There is no royalty nor nobility in my ancestry (unless it was through sexual abuse) and I really could not care less. My people were all peasants, servants, the lowest of the low. My people built the castles, the villas, the manor houses, or worked the fields, cooked, cleaned or something so that royalty could have the lifestyle they had.
     
  17. Sep 25, 2018 #17

    Patchouli

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    I have super powers. :woo hoo:
    There can only be so many dukes and duchesses. The rest are required to work. I was surprised at the lines of heritage I came from. We certainly didn't have money.
     
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  18. Sep 25, 2018 #18

    Flight

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    In my limited knowledge of DNA testing, I'm sure it has it's good points and bad points. I guess it's what perspective( yep a big word for me lol) you look at it from.

    I believe that the kids being born in the near future say 10 to 20 years from now will be DNA sampled, microchip, and who knows what else that will be invented by that time and the new parents will not only be willing to do it but will have it done themselves. They will be in every known and unknown database around the world. Kind of like the movie Tron with that disk on their backs.
     
  19. Sep 25, 2018 #19

    Amish Heart

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    Geesh, Flight, I hope not.
     
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  20. Sep 25, 2018 #20

    Weedygarden

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    While I would not like that to happen, I believe you are absolutely correct.
     
  21. Sep 25, 2018 #21

    Flight

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    Unfortunately it's not about what people like you or I or anyone else here think, it's what the ultra uber rich people of this world dictates to their pupits so they can get even richer by tracking our every move from birt to death which is very scary to me. They will disguise it as look at how convenient that is. And once the new babies are adults.... well you get the picture.
     
  22. Sep 26, 2018 #22

    kd4ulw

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    I did 23&me a few years ago. Along with the ancestry it included the health scan. Fortunately, there wasn’t any major problem indicated on the health side and I haven’t seen a clone of myself....yet. :ghostly:

    I found it interesting. Had wondered if there might be some African-American or Native-American in the mix but not shown, but it did show .2% North African (which is more of a Mediterranean or Middle Eastern influence) from somewhere many generations ago.

    One of the things they really stress before you send in your spit sample is that you might find out more information than you really wanted to know. It would be interesting to see how many of those that have taken the test find themselves related to the neighbors instead of their own father. I was contacted by a 2nd to 3rd cousin who I’ve never heard of, in another state, that after he had taken the test found that he wasn’t matching other cousins on his father’s side that had taken the same brand test. He is older and his parents are no longer alive to get info from. That just leaves three possibilities I can think of, a few generations ago a ‘stranger’ came through town (no pun intended), he was adopted and not told, or was somehow switched in the hospital.
     
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  23. Sep 27, 2018 #23

    Weedygarden

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    There are many possibilities when it comes to DNA not matching--illicit affairs, rape, parents not wanting children to marry in spite of baby, mother being really young when she had baby, and so many more. The biological parents may have gotten pregnant just as man was leaving to war and killed in action.
     
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  24. Oct 5, 2018 #24

    Weedygarden

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    Interesting use of DNA to solve a crime:

    https://abcnews.go.com/US/genetic-g...edited-solving-1998-murders/story?id=58312506

    Genetic genealogy, police work credited with solving 1998 murders of woman and 12-year-old daughter
    Authorities in Missouri are pointing to advanced DNA technology good police work for helping investigators to finally identify the suspect in the murders of a woman and her 12-year-old daughter in 1998.

    The Missouri State Highway Patrol and New Madrid County Sheriff’s Office held a joint news conference Friday to shed light on and detail how they'd linked the heinous double murder of Sherri and Megan Scherer, as well as several other unsolved crimes in other states, to Robert Eugene Brashers.

    Brashers, 40, of Paragould, Arkansas, died in January 1999 after he shot himself in the head during a standoff with police at a Missouri motel, authorities said Friday.

    [​IMG]Missouri State Highway Patrol
    This composite sketch was created in 1998 by a woman who'd been shot by an unknown assailant trying to break into her home hours after the murders of Sherry and Megan Scherer.more +


    In March 1998, the bodies of Sherri Scherer, 38, and Megan Scherer, 12, were found about 7 p.m. in their home in rural Portageville, Missouri, authorities said. They had been shot to death, police added, and Megan had been sexually assaulted.

    A few hours later, authorities said, police got a report of a man attempting to break into the home of a woman and her children in Tennessee's Dyer County. During a struggle with the woman, the unidentified man shot the woman in the arm.

    The woman was able to get back inside the home, however. Ballistics connected the shooting to the Scherer murders, according to authorities.

    The woman gave police a composite sketch and a partial DNA profile was created in 1998. In 2006, evidence from the Scherer murders was then re-sent to the Missouri State Highway Patrol's Crime Lab and a full suspect DNA profile was created and entered into the Combined DNA Index System.

    Police said that submission uncovered a match to the April 1990 unsolved murder of Genevieve Zitricki, 28, who was found dead in her home in Greenville, South Carolina. All the while, police said, investigators continued looking into leads and conducting interviews.

    A search for a suspect that had started in Missouri now had grown to include two additional states.

    In May 2017, another match was uncovered via the DNA index system that linked the suspected perpetrator to a March 1997 rape of a 14-year-old girl in Memphis during a home invasion. The victim and witnesses helped put together a composite drawing of the suspect, investigators said.

    In 2018, investigators said they reached out to a company called Parabon NanoLabs, whose technology "combines DNA testing and genetic genealogy analysis" to link a person with their ancestors.

    [​IMG]Memphis Police Department
    This composite sketch was created by the victim of a March 1997 rape in Memphis and witnesses to a home invasion.more +


    "Parabon’s process provided leads to law enforcement investigators that, when combined with traditional investigative techniques, led to the identification" of Brashers, authorities said in a statement.

    Investigators got DNA samples from his relatives and "test results indicated Mr. Brashers was, with very little doubt, responsible for the crimes," the statement said.

    In September, his remains were exhumed and additional samples were taken and tested to confirm that his DNA indeed matched the DNA found in the crimes.

    "This is an amazing example of a cooperative, investigative effort by Missouri, South Carolina and Tennessee authorities. All parties worked together, including the decision [to] seek the services of Parabon NanoLabs," said Sgt. Shawn Griggs of Missouri State Highway Patrol Division of Drug and Crime Control. "During the history of these cases, investigators from Missouri, South Carolina and Tennessee have worked close to 1,500 leads and the homicides here in Missouri were featured on 'America's Most Wanted' two different times."

    Police said Brashers' criminal history included a conviction for attempted murder in November 1986 due to an incident in Florida.

    In 1998, according to authorities, he'd been arrested in Paragould for allegedly attempting to break into a woman's home.
    In January 1999, police in Missouri were investigating a case involving a stolen license plate when they encountered a friend of Brashers. Police said Brashers was allegedly armed with a pistol at a Kennett, Missouri, motel.

    "Officers learned during the standoff that Brashers had active warrants for his arrest stemming from the 1998 incident in Paragould, Arizona," authorities said in its statement.

    Before police could arrest him, Brashers allegedly shot himself to death.

    Griggs told ABC News Friday that authorities had met with the Scherer family Thursday to inform relatives. He said technology and investigators' working together had enabled authorities to "honor" their commitment not only to the family but also to the people of Missouri.

    "I have no doubt in my mind that this is the most heavily investigated case this county has ever seen," Stevens said Friday. "When I took office in January of 2001, I made the decision this would never become a cold case, as far as we were concerned. This case would always be at the forefront of our workload. It was too important to the Scherer family and the community of Portageville."
     
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  25. Jan 10, 2019 #25

    Weedygarden

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    https://returntonow.net/2019/01/09/...cWmAq3_238MHCz8Z09e6V4HfnYhaQapEmyGKMbACj-57g

    Big Pharma Just Bought Access to Your DNA From Genealogy Company 23andMe

    Human DNA has now become a commodity, with 23andMe the world’s largest database of genetic code — serving as the “new frontier” for pioneering drugmakers.

    British pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline recently purchased a $300 million share in the genlogy company, which promises to tell you your ancestry in exchange for your DNA.

    The “merger” of the two companies will accelerate the development of “novel treatments and cures,” GSK’s CEO wrote in a blog post.

    23andMe customers’ genetic blueprints may now be used in studies that will enable GSK to get new drugs approved and to market faster, the pharmacuetical company boasted in a press release.

    The data transfer has given rise to privacy concerns.

    “If people are concerned about their social security numbers being stolen, they should be concerned about their genetic information being misused,” says Peter Pitts, president of the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest, a non-profit that aims to promote patient-centered health care.

    “This information is never 100% safe. The risk is magnified when one organization shares it with a second organization. When information moves from one place to another, there’s always a chance for it to be intercepted by unintended third parties.”

    Current reports state that 80% of 23andMe customers opt to share their genetic data, along with a survey about their lifestyle and health status, for research purposes,

    Over 5 million people so far have submitted a sample of their saliva to 23andMe in exchange for a chance to receive healthcare and ancestry insights.


    As genetic profiling technologies evolve, 23andMe is serving as a translation service, turning living bodies into code that can be aggregated into big data.

    This big data represents big profit for big pharma, who can use it to create experimental drug that can be marketed to consumers based on their genetic profiles.

    The FDA warns this includes an inherent risk of diagnoses and perscriptions based on false positives or false negatives for certain genetic traits.

    23andMe acknowledges the potential for security breaches on its website:

    “Your genetic data, survey responses, and/or personally identifying
    information may be stolen in the event of a security breach.
    In the event of such a breach, if your data are associated with your identity,
    they may be made public or released to insurance companies,
    which could have a negative effect on your ability to obtain insurance coverage.”


    People interested in closing their 23andMe accounts can go here, however, according to the company: “any research involving your data that has already been performed or published prior to our receipt of your request will not be reversed, undone, or withdrawn.”

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I tried to copy and paste this article, and I may have messed it up in the process.
     
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  26. Jan 10, 2019 #26

    backlash

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    I will never willingly give my DNA to anyone.
    I firmly believe all the DNA testing services are ran by the government.
    If they are not government owned they are government connected.
     
  27. Jan 10, 2019 #27

    Weedygarden

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    I agree with you. Call me paranoid. I have a very deep interest in DNA due to my genealogy research, but will never have mine checked. I have had cousins who have had their DNA analyzed, so I imagine it really makes no difference if I have mine done or not.

    I have a fairly rare blood type, B-, and have been interested in all the possibilities that different blood types might be as well.
     
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  28. Jan 10, 2019 #28

    joel

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  29. Jan 10, 2019 #29

    Patchouli

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    Right.
     
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  30. Jan 12, 2019 #30

    Weedygarden

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    One of the coordinators of my genealogy group sent this out for inexpensive DNA testing in anyone is interested. There is a time limit. Early bird registration, $19.99 by January 18, $24.99 by January 26.
     

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