Food preferences

Discussion in 'HIking, Camping, Backpacking' started by Patchouli, Oct 19, 2018.

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  1. Oct 19, 2018 #1

    Patchouli

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    Tell us about what you prefer: MREs, trail food, canned meals, junk, whatever. I've read A Walk in the Woods (movie reviews were really bad). My kids have gone out for 10-12 days at a time so I've seen some of what they've taken.
    Even if you're talking about NOT hiking, but camping (like a campground), please share what you do for food. Maybe you're bringing a cooler, got a stove, etc.
     
  2. Oct 19, 2018 #2

    backlash

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    I bring my wife and a motor home.
    She brings along more stuff then Columbus did when he discovered America.
    We eat better on the road than at home.
     
  3. Oct 19, 2018 #3

    Bacpacker

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    When using the camper we eat anything we want, mostly similar to eating at home.
    Backpacking, we used to take lipton noodle or rice packages, boil n bag dishes (green peas and beef stroganoff were our 2 favorites. Wife would also make a hearty chicken soup and then freeze it. By the time we got to camp it would be thawed and just needed heating up. It was good and filling, but was very heavy. Now days, some freeze dried, Lipton dinners, tuna or chicken foil packets make do.
     
  4. Oct 19, 2018 #4

    timmie

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    Coolers ,and we eat what we eat at home. Steak fish chicken, burgers,etc.
     
  5. Oct 19, 2018 #5

    kd4ulw

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    I have done MRE’s backpacking. It’s kind of fun to see what you get in the packet. Lately the ones you can get are pretty varied in what the main entrée is. Quick and easy is a can of beef stew on a little butane pocket stove. It’s a bit heavy but tastes pretty good. I usually take a snack of mixed nuts and M&Ms.
     
  6. Oct 19, 2018 #6

    Patchouli

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    Let's go ahead and include food security in this thread. Bear bags, etc.
    When you're on the trail, you're not near your auto, you've hiked in quite a ways, got your food with you, time to hunker down for the night.
    You guys use bear bags? If you want to pack light, you're not carrying canned food. You're carrying stuff in packaging, right? Don't the critters smell it?
     
  7. Oct 19, 2018 #7

    dademoss

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    If it's a bear area, for sure use a bear bag!! Everything that might smell goes in and up! Been there, heard and seen that, it not an event to be repeated :(
     
  8. Oct 20, 2018 #8

    Terri9630

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    If camping near the car we take a mix of foods. If camping away from the car then we use dehydrated/freeze dried foods. I don't buy the "meals", I buy the ingredients and make my own mixes. We just have to make sure we have access to water.
     
  9. Oct 20, 2018 #9

    Bacpacker

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    I carry 2 hanks of paracord, a carabiner, and a pully. Get the line over a thin limb 12-15' off the ground and 4-6' from the trunk. Pull your food bag up to the pully and tie it off. I have used this method for years and have yet to lose a food bag.
    On one trip the was 8 separate groups camped where we were at. Later that night the campsite was raided by 2 bears. Long story short, 7 of the 8 groups had not taken the time to properly hang their food and the bears got them all. Never touched our food bags. One group even left food inside their tent, a brand new $500 tent. needless to say the tent was totaled. Some groups left food in their packs, they were totaled as well.
    The Park Service has installed a cable system at all back country campsites, complete with pulley's for hanging food bags. It is 15-20' off the ground and spread between 2 trees. It works very well.
     
  10. Oct 21, 2018 #10

    SheepDog

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    I take dried foods with the exception of one meal of canned meat product, like beef stew or complete meal in a can. It gets eaten once we get to our destination to resupply the calories used on the hike in. I always save the dehydrated meat for the night before we head home. While in camp we trap squirrels, fish, and forage for protein, fruit and veggies and have flour, fat, salt and sugar to supplement the carbs needed. We also have a trail mix that consists of chocolate chips, raisins, nuts and chopped dried fruit. We don't eat while hiking but at rest stops along the way when water is available we will have a couple of tablespoons of trail mix with a cup of water water. Doing that we could cover up to 20 miles in a day. We ate pretty well in camp and if the blueberries were in season we always had blueberry pancakes for at least one breakfast. For drinks we had powdered cocoa mix, coffee, tang and kool-aid but most of the time we drank pure clean water. Coffee or cocoa was for mornings after crawling out of the bags and evening before crawling back in.
     
  11. Oct 21, 2018 #11

    Weedygarden

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    People are lucky to be alive!
     
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  12. Oct 22, 2018 #12

    Bacpacker

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    They were all up on the bald looking at the city lights while the bears were rummaging around. We were the only ones in camp. Ran them off several times and they never touched any of our stuff.
     
  13. Oct 23, 2018 #13

    Patchouli

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    Give me a more specific example of a meal that you put together, using freeze dried or dehydrated foods, please.
    And nobody has mentioned pemmican.
     
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  14. Oct 23, 2018 #14

    jimLE

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    The foods i take along,vary from 1 camping trip to the next,when it comes to the good for ya foods.my last camping trip included some homemade and canned chicken soup and chilli.and of course everything needed for chilli dogs.eggs n bacon.but only if i think i'll be eating breakfast at least once or twice,during a camping trip.and of course,i took along my fav junk foods.like tater chips and payday candy bars.i knew there'd be running water there.but i still took freshwater with.just in case theirs got/was shut down for what ever reason(s)..
     
  15. Oct 23, 2018 #15

    Amish Heart

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    Pemmican gets stuck in my teeth and tastes nasty.
     
  16. Oct 23, 2018 #16

    Patchouli

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    Ah ha! A confession.
    I'd like to hear more about drinking water and having enough, or purification systems you like/don't like.
     
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  17. Oct 23, 2018 #17

    Terri9630

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    I have a couple of books that have "Meal in a jar" recipes. I've also taken regular recipes and instead of a couple of chicken breasts I'll use a jar of home canned chicken or a couple cups of freeze dried chicken.

    For example, I'm eating chicken and dumplings right now that I made this way. Instead of a stewed chicken I used 2 quarts of caned chicken, a small hand full of dehydrated celery a 1/4 cup of freeze dried carrots and peas, 1/4 cup dehydrated onion, salt, pepper and a 1/2 cup of powdered milk. A little cornstarch and water to thicken it up if it needs it.

    You can put all the dry ingredients for dumplings in a bag or bowl to mix up but I prefer biscuits with mine.

    Oh, and everything except the freeze dried carrots and peas (and salt & pepper & powdered milk) was raised right here at home.
     
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  18. Oct 23, 2018 #18

    Amish Heart

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    I use the meal in a jar recipes. Patchouli...look them up online. I must also have a dozen meals in a jar recipe books. You don't have to put them in a jar. You can put them in a ziplock and bring them backpacking. A lot of dehydrated foods can be ingredients for backpacking foods. Take Ramen Noodles. Bring those and add a baggie of dehydrated vegetables and a few pieces of homemade beef jerky to it when you cook it. Or bring tomato powder, dried cheese and pasta noodles. All you need is water. I've dehydrated cooked garbanzo beans, then ground them to a powder. You can take a little baggie of that, a tiny container of olive oil, and some spices and you have hummus. I do like hummus. I also dehydrate cooked beans. Those are easy to take backpacking, and add some tomato powder, dried spices, and it's pretty good. Then you don't have to soak and cook beans forever.
    Water filters...for home I have a Big Berkey. We use Katydyn for camping and life straw. I have tablets, but don't use them. Oh and the hamburger soup I made the other night was all storage food except the hamburger. And I could of used home canned hamburger. The broth was tomato powder and beef bouillon. I added spices and home dehydrated mixed vegetables and potatoes.
    I guess it's "prepper fastfood" when you do meals in a jar.
     
  19. Mar 14, 2019 #19

    LadyLocust

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    @Patchouli When we camp we usually take our little trailer. It has a stove but we prefer a campfire. Have you ever had pecan bacon grilled over an open flame - food of the gods I tell ya. We usually have poor fare like steak and fire baked potatoes . As far as hiking, during elk season we are apt to be out all day. In the way of nourishment, water is top priority. We each take a jug and have extra in the rig. Hubby takes 2 apples, some jerky, and some trail mix that I make. The only grain in it is some oatmeal. I will take an apple, some jerky and some dried apricots and pumpkin seeds. Even going 14+ hrs. we don’t typically eat much of what we take - more of a snack at lunchtime. I will usually chew on a green pine needle a couple times per day (good source of vit C) or a dandelion green if I find a green one just to see if they are still any good that time of year. Not sure if this is the type of info you’re after.
     
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  20. Mar 14, 2019 #20

    Patchouli

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    Yes, great info, @LadyLocust . I feel like I'm a baby to everything camping, hiking, etc cuz it's been awhile since I "got out there."
     
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  21. Mar 14, 2019 #21

    JAC

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    I always found that when I backpacked in there was a certain satisfaction to eating well once there. A steak and baked potato for dinner and i liked to pack eggs for a real egg breakfast the next morning.
     
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  22. Mar 15, 2019 #22

    SheepDog

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    When I was very young we would take a can of beef stew for the first night (the only canned food we had). Raw meat would not be any good after a long day of hiking and eggs... no, I don't think so.
    The first morning was usually pancakes and fresh trout. Coffee and instant hot cocoa were the preferred breakfast drinks. Water was almost always available so that was what we drank.
    We figured out our meals so we had three meals and two snacks every day plus three days worth. We also ALWAYS carried emergency food for three days - just in case something happened.
    We always foraged for food and usually had enough meat to satisfy.
    Remember that in wilderness areas you pack out everything that wasn't there when you came. EVERYTHING! I loved it!
     
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  23. Mar 15, 2019 #23

    Weedygarden

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    A former colleague of mine took her class of inner city students hiking. I am sure that most of them had never been out before. It was a day hike, just a couple hours. They all had a water bottle and snacks. She told about them throwing wrappers on the ground after they ate their snacks. Well, that is what they do in the inner city as well!
     
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  24. Mar 15, 2019 #24

    SheepDog

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    They would be picking up debris the entire hike if I saw them drop anything on the ground.
    We always left a place completely free of any sign that we had been there. It's just the way I was taught.
     
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  25. Mar 15, 2019 #25

    Bacpacker

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    I always carry a small trash bag and pick up stuff along the trail.
     
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