Homemade soap articles

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dademoss

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dademoss

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Top 2 links work. Bottom two have errors. But thank you! I’m looking to and our own soap sooner than later.
Thank you, corrected the errors , they should work now.
 

LadyLocust

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I started making my own soap when Hubby started walking around scratching like an orangutan 🦧. I don’t mind. I just make it in the crockpot.
 

Double R

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I started making my own soap when Hubby started walking around scratching like an orangutan 🦧. I don’t mind. I just make it in the crockpot.
😂😂😂😂😂😂 In the crockpot!?!?!
We’ve started buying natural soap and won’t go back. It’s on the list to make our own. What we buy now costs a small fortune
 

LadyLocust

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😂😂😂😂😂😂 In the crockpot!?!?!
We’ve started buying natural soap and won’t go back. It’s on the list to make our own. What we buy now costs a small fortune
Hot process doesn’t have to cure for weeks. It can be used the next day.
 

LadyLocust

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How is the "hot process" different from the standard? I have not researched it as yet.
Hot process just means cooked which is the crockpot. It speeds the saponification process (reaction between lye and oils). Cold process doesn’t involve cooking but then you have to let it sit for 6-12 weeks depending upon recipe in order for the process to occur. If you try to use it too soon, the lye will burn you.
 

Double R

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Hot process just means cooked which is the crockpot. It speeds the saponification process (reaction between lye and oils). Cold process doesn’t involve cooking but then you have to let it sit for 6-12 weeks depending upon recipe in order for the process to occur. If you try to use it too soon, the lye will burn you.
I am soooooo interested in this magic
 

Guardian

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Hot process just means cooked which is the crockpot. It speeds the saponification process (reaction between lye and oils). Cold process doesn’t involve cooking but then you have to let it sit for 6-12 weeks depending upon recipe in order for the process to occur. If you try to use it too soon, the lye will burn you.
Understood the process but good to know there is a method to speed it up. Are there time charts available anywhere or discussion? As you said, some can take weeks with "standard" methods.
When curing meats its done with time and cure based on weight and such. Just curious if there is something similar.
 

Terri9630

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I just make up a batch when I'm down to a dozen bars. It takes about 9 months for me to use those up so it can sit as long as it needs. I've never tried the hot process.
 

LadyLocust

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Understood the process but good to know there is a method to speed it up. Are there time charts available anywhere or discussion? As you said, some can take weeks with "standard" methods.
When curing meats its done with time and cure based on weight and such. Just curious if there is something similar.
I’m not sure about a chart - I’m sure a google search. I have a couple books I can dig into a little but I don’t make cold process so don’t have it memorized.
 

Guardian

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I’m not sure about a chart - I’m sure a google search. I have a couple books I can dig into a little but I don’t make cold process so don’t have it memorized.
Too late for me to dig tonight but now that I know there is an additional option I will look at it further. Thanks for the info. :)
 

Shawn Burkett

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Curing soap means it's drying out. When it stops losing weight it's cured. It also mellows some in the process.

Saponification should happen within 24-48 hours. Then it should be safe to touch. It's usable then but most people prefer to let it cure.
With hot process- cooking it, you should be able to touch it, and technically use it as soon as it's done. I use the pot scrapings to see how well it lathers and works. Hot process still needs to cure. (Unless of course you are like me and use some right away.)
 

bamadeb48

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I love soap. TJ max has a lot of different kinds, cranberry , pine scent, I also order from Cobble Hill, goat soap, would love to make my own...
 

joel

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Do not forget the sponge for home made soap:
Luffa aegyptiaca
Common Name(s):

Phonetic SpellingLOOF-fuh eh-jip-TEE-ah-kuhDescription
Luffah sponge gourd (also spelled loofah), is commonly used as a bath sponge, but young fruits that are less than 7 inches long and green can be eaten as squash or fresh cucumber substitute. As common as loofas are, most people don’t realize that they are made from a plant, and that plant can be grown right here in North Carolina! These cucurbit vegetables need at least 6 hours of full sun, well-drained soil, good air circulation, and a good, sturdy trellis to thrive. Mature luffas can be harvested in the fall when the gourds are tan, light and dry, and the seeds shake inside when rattled. To make your own “loofa,” simply soak the fruit in warm water for 5-20 minutes until the skin can be easily stripped off. When the skin is off, remove the seeds and excess pulp and rinse in a 10% chlorine bleach solution to lighten the sponges.
 

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