Homesteading in the US vs South America?

Discussion in 'Country Living Questions' started by _lppaiva, Aug 8, 2019.

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  1. Aug 8, 2019 #1

    _lppaiva

    _lppaiva

    _lppaiva

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    Okay, so for some context this is my first post

    I'm 18 years old and am currently residing in Brazil, a country well known for its favourable climate, abundant production and investment in the area of agriculture.

    I will have my major either in agronomy/rural science, that only exists here, or I plan to try and get a scholarship in Cornell for Animal Science and Management. Athough I'm not sure if it's necessary to do a major for a homestead, I really don't know what else to do with my time to try and achieve my goal, as I am young and broke. My plan would be to insert myself in the "area" early on while studying, start working in the field and later invest in a homestead, with the money and knowledge that I will have. It's seems like the most efficient way.

    I'm not sure if most homesteaders are self thought because it was a late decision and going back to college wouldn't be worth the effort or if it truly isn't necessary, but If not I really don't know what to do.

    Anyway, besides of course needing to pass the exams, what will determine my major will be where I live. I love my country and it has some favourable conditions for homesteading, but lacks the information and knowledge most american homesteaders have.

    At first that isn't really an issue, as I can myself start implementing this knowledge here, but I'd also lack a lot of "products" that you guys have and that would need to be imported, (specific things really important for my ideas that I can't seem to find here) which leads to my second point. The economy here worries me, first as I'd pay triple the price for certain things I'd need and second because I'm afraid of the current crisis in my country.

    How is homesteading in the U.S? Is it better to homestead in a more tropical country, easier to grow fruits and vegetables? Would it be worth the effort to go to the U.S just to have my homestead or should I just work with what I got? Considering Cornell is one of the top Universities in the field and it would be extremely difficult to enter, in contrast the college Id go to in Brazil is much easier, but with less international prestige (but lots of national prestige).
     
  2. Aug 8, 2019 #2

    backlash

    backlash

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    First off Welcome aboard.
    I'm always interested in hearing from people with different life experiences from different cultures.
    You will probably find most homesteaders are self taught, or were born into the homesteading/farming life.
    I would start learning from the local people and I would stay right where you are. You don't have to deal with winter and that is a big advantage having a year round growing season.
     
  3. Aug 8, 2019 #3

    The Lazy L

    The Lazy L

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    First, welcome!

    Second, the answer your questions. I can't answer them. I can give you some free advise. I don't believe college or a degree guarantees wisdom. To many in the United States have borrowed too much money for a college education and then unable to find employment and pay back their debt. The public library and the Internet is full of shelf help books and information. You joining this forum and asking questions is also a method.

    You mentioned that you don't have money. I'd suggest a step would to find employment, work hard, dont complain and be a reliable employee. Save 10%, Tithe 10% and live on the 80%. You are young and the years will fly by. Before you know it that 10% in savings will have build to a nice sum, then act on your desire for a homestead.

    Which country would provide the best security? I don't know. If President Trump had not been elected, the US citizens would have been in a world of hurt.
     
  4. Aug 9, 2019 #4

    Cascadian

    Cascadian

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    Welcome, if I could give my 18 year old self some advice it would be
    Avoid debt whenever possible.
    Take care of yourself physically.

    It is easier to stay in shape than get into shape. I had some minor injuries in my youth I ignored that are becoming a big deal now that I am over 50. Agricultural science is great but learn how to build things and fix things. Being able to do things yourself will save money and is really satisfying. As far as as location no place is perfect. We are pretty sure the wheels are going to fall of here in the US eventually. You have plenty of time to get where you want to be. Good luck.
     
  5. Aug 9, 2019 #5

    Meerkat

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    Hi Imppa, Are the girl from Ipanema or if male do you know her ?:p

    I'd say the better climate for sustainable living is your best bet.
    Plus America is quickly changing and not for the best.
    I'd study more into alternative crop producing and animal husbandry.
    I don't know about Brazil but I do know that America is running out of fresh water. Whats not being dried up by corporations is being polluted by them. Our shores are not doing any better because of over population and offshore drilling.
    A hard rains gonna fall here on us soon nor that about 50% of us are on welfare in some form or another.
    Add to this the violence and divisions here.

    I would check into Hydroponics, Aquaponics and other soiless type studies. Good luck and :welcome::woo hoo:to the forum.

     
  6. Aug 9, 2019 #6

    Caribou

    Caribou

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    Welcome from Alaska.

    I will reiterate the advice to stay out of debt. The colleges in America are very expensive. Tuition has been going up way faster than inflation. Don't worry about the prestige of a school, worry about the education and the cost of the education. You might be able to learn what you want to know by working for someone else, buying books or using a library, taking online courses, just getting in and getting your hands dirty, sites like this. Neither the plants nor the animals will ever ask to see your degree and they will not be impressed if you show it to them.

    Get a job where you can learn to be a carpenter or a mechanic and start a garden at home. Having a homestead is not just about plants and animals. A trade school to learn to be a carpenter will do more for you on a homestead. Hang around here and ask us questions. We hang around and joke and chat but if there is a serious question we put on our homesteader or prepper hats and go to work. We love answering questions. I hope you enjoy your time here.
     
  7. Aug 9, 2019 #7

    Cnsper

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    Cornell university does not bring to mind agricultural teaching. Yes they may have a reputation but there are others that are just as good. For instance Washington State University has a very good program for crops and livestock. As a matter of fact, the old beef barn on campus was built in 1938.

    You don't teach courses that long with inferior coursework. They would be much cheaper to attend also.
     
  8. Aug 9, 2019 #8

    VirginPrepper

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    Sooooo........I have learned that when people "Now Days" use the word "Homesteading" they really mean Purchase some land and farm it either small or large.

    I have long thought it odd that people choose not call themselves farmer or hobby farmer or rural resident with a garden either large or small and some domestic animals. Those each being more accurate then "Homesteading" or the one that makes me puke........."Homesteader".

    It has been explained to me that the meaning of words change over time.
     
  9. Aug 10, 2019 #9

    Spikedriver

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    Hello...

    I have distant relatives that moved to Brazil from the US about 35 years ago. Cleared a patch of land, planted crops that would, in time, balance out the nutrients in the soil so that corn could grow, and as far as I can tell they are still prospering. I would imagine that there are plenty of opportunities in Brazil for you to live an independent rural lifestyle. I know nothing about higher education in Brazil, but surely a good education in practical sciences like agriculture or engineering are available. Never underestimate the power of an engineering background. If nothing else it can teach a person to recognize the obstacles that need to be overcome to turn a seemingly useless piece of land into a viable lifestyle.

    Once again, hello, and welcome.
     
  10. Aug 10, 2019 #10

    Sewingcreations15

    Sewingcreations15

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    Hi @_lppaiva and welcome to the forum from Australia :) .

    I will reiterate the stay out of debt, work hard and save for your homestead/farm or at least put a good deposit down before borrowing money.

    We were both self taught on how to garden and do things around our property/farm here. My husband was a jackeroo on large properties from the age of 15 and learnt by doing on cattle production, growing crops, building and repairing things.

    A lot can be learned by reading, the internet, and borrowing library books in regards to any farming skills you need.

    If I had something to say re your education I would say qualify in a number of different fields for when times are hard or there are global financial crisis/recession. I have lived through 3 financial crisis's and because I had skills in multiple fields and areas I always found work.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2019

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