Log splitters

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Cascadian

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I am in the market for a log splitter. I used my neighbor's Cub Cadet 26 ton. It was great they are available at Home Depot e.t.c. for $1399. I think they are a US company and mostly made here. I was also looking at a Power Pro 27 ton $1299. My understanding is they are made by Oregon Co, USA and just came out. I called Oregon to confirm and believe it or not they barely knew about them. They do sell splitters under the Oregon name. Why are they not putting thier name on the offshoot brand? I moved from the desert and don't know jack about this sort of thing. I mentioned looking on Craigslist and the neighbor said why would anyone living here in Oregon sell a splitter that was working right? Good question. What are your thoughts?
 

Terri9630

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My thoughts are, I'm going to have to look into that cub cadet the next time I get a no interest coupon for my home depot card. We need a larger splitter.
 
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Cascadian

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What size do you have now?
 

Terri9630

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A little bitty 5 ton.
 

Sewingcreations15

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From reading up on them @Cascadian as we are in the market for ones ourselves the top of the range ones and ones that work the best are the kinetic log splitters rather than the haudraulic. I recommend you read up on them and make up your own mind though and the kinetic use far less fuel, and 2.5 - 3 times as fast splitting logs and they are reasonably priced too over here in Australia.
 

zoomzoom

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I was at Home Depot the other day and happened to take a look at the log splitters sitting outside. I DID NOT like them.

Mechanically, all log splitters are pretty much the same. An engine, hydraulic pump, valve , reservoir and a cylinder. There's different engines, pumps and valves that make the price differences (e.g. A Honda or Kohler engine will be more expensive than a Briggs) but I wouldn't worry too much about that. Most have log cradles now so that shouldn't be a factor either. No matter what you pick, it'll probably last a lifetime if maintained.

What is important is ergonomics and secondly component placement to avoid splitter damage. When you're in your operator position, how much room do you have and what splitter components are in your way?

My preference is the Speeco brand which are also sold under other names like Huskee at Tractor Supply. I'm posting a picture below so you can see what I'm talking about.

Notice that the axle, engine... are all well forward of your splitting area. This gives you plenty of space to set your logs and do your splitting without your legs having to worry about bumping into splitter components. I don't have a good internet picture of the Cub Cadet but I think you'll find the axle, engine... are all set back further which encroaches on your work space. If your splitter comes with fenders, I'd remove them. Your shins will greatly appreciate that. Bumping your leg into a rubber tire doesn't hurt. Bumping your shin into steel fender edges does hurt. The fender on the other side will eventually get smashed as your split wood falls off the other side. For the engine placement, it can be on either side of the splitter so long as it sits out of the way of your split wood.

As for the kinetic splitters, my experience is they're good if you're young or in a hurry. Personally, I run my hydraulic splitter at no more than half-throttle and that's about as fast as I want to move.

IMG_0625-2-1024x768.jpg IMG_0625-2-1024x768.jpg
 

Bacpacker

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I dont own one yet, but have rented on in yeaes past tto split a lot quick for my grand parents. I would NEVER buy one that would not raise to vertical. It's not an issue for smaller logs, but lifting and balacing big logs is difficult and dangerous.
So too with component placement. Shins are painful areas to beat up and slow to heal.
 

Tirediron

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Another option are the tapered screw type splitters, basically a giant tapered wood screw that is driven by a small engine or even hooked to the hub of a car/truck axle.
I have a shop built monster cylinder hydraulic splitter that I power with my John Deere, but it ends up being a bit of a workout to use. Biggest consideration is buy a big/ powerful enough unit and make sure replacement parts are going to be available.
 

Homesteader33

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I was at Home Depot the other day and happened to take a look at the log splitters sitting outside. I DID NOT like them.

Mechanically, all log splitters are pretty much the same. An engine, hydraulic pump, valve , reservoir and a cylinder. There's different engines, pumps and valves that make the price differences (e.g. A Honda or Kohler engine will be more expensive than a Briggs) but I wouldn't worry too much about that. Most have log cradles now so that shouldn't be a factor either. No matter what you pick, it'll probably last a lifetime if maintained.

What is important is ergonomics and secondly component placement to avoid splitter damage. When you're in your operator position, how much room do you have and what splitter components are in your way?

My preference is the Speeco brand which are also sold under other names like Huskee at Tractor Supply. I'm posting a picture below so you can see what I'm talking about.

Notice that the axle, engine... are all well forward of your splitting area. This gives you plenty of space to set your logs and do your splitting without your legs having to worry about bumping into splitter components. I don't have a good internet picture of the Cub Cadet but I think you'll find the axle, engine... are all set back further which encroaches on your work space. If your splitter comes with fenders, I'd remove them. Your shins will greatly appreciate that. Bumping your leg into a rubber tire doesn't hurt. Bumping your shin into steel fender edges does hurt. The fender on the other side will eventually get smashed as your split wood falls off the other side. For the engine placement, it can be on either side of the splitter so long as it sits out of the way of your split wood.

As for the kinetic splitters, my experience is they're good if you're young or in a hurry. Personally, I run my hydraulic splitter at no more than half-throttle and that's about as fast as I want to move.

View attachment 10085 View attachment 10085
This is spot on...pay attention to where the engine and hydraulics are located! I have one of these models spoken of here and just had to repair a broken intake cover when a split log smacked down on it! Now I am going to have to make a cage or something to protect it so it doesn't happen again. Now I am also looking at the hydraulic hoses and how to protect them from future impacts! Great advice above folks...pay attention if your in the market!
 

Tirediron

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Another thing to consider is if you are deep into or plan on getting deep into homesteading is that with very little modification a hydraulic log splitter can become a portable hydraulic unit, handy if you have to move a hydraulic cylinder lift implement to tow home beyond handy tractor distances. also handy with a bit of plumbing to lift the loader on a non running tractor so it can be blocked for transport ETC.
 
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AtomicFarmer

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I have a 35 ton Huskee (I think) that we got at Tractor Supply around 10 years ago now. It's been great-needed some minor maintenance but it's been pretty trouble free. It's one of the ones that tilts to vertical and the hinge rusted out on me a few years ago. It's not really a hinge-more a tube with a hitch pin through it. When that left go the whole main beam fell over toward me, log and all. I was able to sidestep and wasn't hurt but it scared me a bit. I had it redone by a professional welder.

Were I to give one word of advice I'd say buy a higher tonnage than you think you'll ever need. You can't have too much power.
 

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