Looking for ideas

Discussion in 'Woodworking' started by rusty, Feb 2, 2019.

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  1. Feb 2, 2019 #1

    rusty

    rusty

    rusty

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    I have my wood shop set up in my new shop. Everything except my table saw. I can't move it. I gave over $1100 for it about 15 years ago. When it was shipped, packing and all was over 800 lbs.I cannot find any way to take it apart. It is almost all cast iron. Here is the main problem. It is laying face down in my old shop. The first thing I need to do is sit it up. I thought about a hoist from the rafters, but they won't hold the weight. This is a very large commercial-type saw with a Beisenmeyer fence. Any ideas on any kind of lift I can use to sit it up that won't damage it? And then maybe use the same lift to sit it on a dolly? Sears no longer makes a saw like this, they have gone to only small contractor style saw.
    This picture is similar in look but of a smaller saw.
    prod_2286743411.jpg I will most likely need to wait until spring to move it but thought I would see if anyone has any ideas. Once it is on a dolly, I have a tilt trailer I can get close.
     
  2. Feb 2, 2019 #2

    Cnsper

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    A frame with a short 6x6 beam and you can lift with that. You just have to build it. Or of you can get one of those extendable forklifts. Even if you cannot use the forklift inside, you may be able to pick it enough to move it outside where there is more room.

    Buying material or renting a machine is all you can do.
     
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  3. Feb 2, 2019 #3

    hiwall

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    A regular engine hoist might work for you.
     
  4. Feb 2, 2019 #4

    rusty

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    It is in a very confined area. Not enough room to set up much. No way to get a fork lift close. Only a couple feet on each side of it. I was just wondering of there was some kind of "Jack type" lift that I could put under the edge of it. I have a little contractor type table saw in my shop for now and we still own the other property. There are times I just miss the precision cuts of that saw.

    I was just thinking of maybe a lift designed for something else that I might be able to use. Probably a long shot. A local mover offered, but he wants $300 an hour. Way out of my price range.
     
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  5. Feb 2, 2019 #5

    backlash

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    Sounds like a simple 6 pack job. Get 3 or 4 guys to turn it over and get it on a dolly. They don't have to life the whole weight of the saw.
    If that's not an option then either of the previous suggestions should work.
    Nice saw and I would love to have the fence. Mine has a Shop Fox fence and while it's nice it has a track on both ends so an out feed table is not and easy deal.
    Why is it laying face down? That seems like an unusual way to store it. Hopefully you didn't get any moisture under it an have a rust problem.

    Just read your latest post.
    When I installed X-Ray equipment we had a safe jack to move the heavy stuff.
    They had straps that went around both jacks and both jacks had hydraulic jacks that lifted the equipment and wheel to roll it around.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Feb 2, 2019 #6

    rusty

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    It got turned over when I was trying to take it apart to make it lighter. But most of it does not come apart. Can't find any help to set it up. I offered $100 on a Facebook site to help me load it and no one was interested.
     
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  7. Feb 2, 2019 #7

    Caribou

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    My first thought was, "How'd you get it upside down in the first place. Just reverse the process."

    Parts
    2ea 2X4X8'
    rope, or cable, or chain
    pallets and blocking
    beer

    How about securing a 2X4 on each side with the rope etc, giving you two handles. Grab the handles and tip the saw over onto a stack of pallets so the saw doesn't fall far once you get it past half way. Take the pressure off and remove one pallet at a time to slowly lower the saw onto its side. While it is on its side you might wish to attach two casters on the high corners of the base. Repeat the process leaving a 6X6 etc near the side without whees so you have space to attach the wheels. The beer is because you're smart enough to not try this alone.

    You are not lifting 800# you are just tipping it over, the floor takes the weight. I used to walk 300# boilers up a flight of stairs by myself and I could never lift half that weight. The handles give you leverage, just make sure they are secure. Bolts might be a better option rather than rope.

    You might also use a come-along attached to your ceiling joist. Remember, you're not trying to lift 800#. The trick will be not to let it jerk the joist when it tips. In fact you might wait to connect the come-along after the saw is resting on the stack of pallets. Make one or two t-braces, a 2X4 spanning at least three joists and another wedged against the floor to carry the weight. If it is a wooden floor I'd want another board to spread the weight at the bottom.
     
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  8. Feb 2, 2019 #8

    joel

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  9. Feb 2, 2019 #9

    Caribou

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    You could use a Hi-Lift jack in the process and perhaps do it by yourself. Do you have access to an engine hoist? A friend? An equipment rental?
     
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  10. Feb 2, 2019 #10

    hiwall

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    You could use a simple crowbar. Just gradually lift a little at a time and put boards or cribbing under it. One side then the other. Could likely do an inch at a time with no trouble.
     
  11. Feb 2, 2019 #11

    Woody

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    I was going to suggest that, levers and wedges.

    I had an old Delta cast iron table saw, same as yours, HEAVY with an old 1 HP motor on it. The top should be bolted on, unbolt it. It will still be a two man job, both for the top and base. The side with the motor is a beast.

    If it is still on its top, unbolt it and get it free. Use a long prybar or crowbar to get under one corner of the base. The top of the base, against the top table. Use a bunch of cedar shingle as wedges to creep it open. When you can get a piece of 1/2" ply , 3/4 stock or 2x under it, do it and remove the shingles.

    I had a bunch of baseball bat blanks from a mill that I used for rollers. I have moved very large old Greenlee commercial shop wood working equipment with them. We are talking a ton apiece. If no rollers you can still 'creep it' using an 8' 2x and some shorter pieces as fulcrum points. First just get it about 4 inches off the top or floor.

    Do you understand about the creeping it part? It is putting the long 2x in the space you created, put a small piece of 2x near the machine as the fulcrum point, lifting it and shift the thing a few inches over by moving the long end of the lever. Move it a few inches at a time, put it back down on the scrap pieces, then repeat. Keep inching it over towards the door, or wherever you need it. It is a slow process but takes little physical effort. I moved those one ton machines all around doing this.

    If you need further details I can take the time to get more detailed about it.
     
  12. Feb 2, 2019 #12

    Woody

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    Re read your OP, confined space. No problem. Use the same technique listed above only a shorter level. Get the fulcrum right nest to the main body of the object so it take less 'effort' to lever it up to shift it. You might only get it an inch at a time but they add up quickly.
     
  13. Feb 3, 2019 #13

    SheepDog

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    A Harbor Freight 2 ton folding engine lift is a great tool for what you want to do and you can use it for other things like removing posts cemented into the ground.
    I also use mine to remove engines and place them on my engine stand. ;)
     
  14. Feb 3, 2019 #14

    Bacpacker

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    They also sell a gantry type lift. You drive a truck under it and lift a load from the bed. But it's on wheels so you can move it around.
     
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  15. Feb 3, 2019 #15

    joel

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    Gantry should only be moved, when there is no load on them. If you move them loaded they will tip over.
    The wheels are so you can store them with ease.
     
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  16. Feb 3, 2019 #16

    Bacpacker

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    Agreed, but sure makes it easy to place them for a lift.
     
  17. Feb 4, 2019 #17

    The Lazy L

    The Lazy L

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    YouTube search or contact the company on how to remove the table top from the base. Question if you really want to do this because the "squareness" on reassembly may be affected greatly.

    Tie securely one or two long 4x4 for levers across the top and tilt upright unto the dolly. Push over to where you can get access to your tilt-trailer. Come-a-long or powered hoist to pull into trailer. Or rope from table saw through a pulley at the front of your trailer going back pass your saw and tied to a secured anchor point. As you slowly drive the trailer forward the Saw will put itself on the trailer.
     

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