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Marlin Glenfield Model 60...

Discussion in 'Rimfire Forum' started by SHOOTER13, Dec 8, 2017.

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  1. Dec 8, 2017 #1

    SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13

    SHOOTER13

    SNIPER Neighbor

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    Marlin Glenfield Model 60... { Circa 1980 }


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    SPECS:

    Type: Rifle
    Action: Self Loading / Straight Blowback / Right-Side Eject
    Caliber: .22 Long Rifle
    Barrel: Micro-Grooved
    Feed System: Under Barrel Tubular Magazine
    Capacity: 18+1 Rounds
    Trigger: Single Action
    Safety: Cross Bolt
    Sights: Post Front / Semi-Buckhorn Rear
    Weight: 5.5 lbs
    Barrel Length: 22"
    Overall Length: 40.5"
    Produced: 1960 ~ Present


    The Marlin Model 99 was developed in 1959 by Ewald Nichol. Internally, it was essentially what would become the Model 60 in 1960. However, major differences were visible from the exterior. The Model 99 featured a walnut stock, and the receiver, instead of being grooved for tip-off scope mounts like the Model 60 would be, was factory-tapped to accept screw-on scope mounts. The Model 99 was offered from 1959 through 1961, and a lower priced version, Model 99G, was offered under Marlin's Glenfield line.

    The Marlin Model 60 was developed in 1960 from the Model 99 design. The primary difference was that the stock was made of birch instead of walnut to reduce the recurring production costs for the more expensive wood. Marlin also moved away from their practice of using steel inner tubes with their tubular magazine. They moved back to brass inner tubes as other companies had done. This, instead of the steel tubes often seen on earlier Marlin .22 rifles, completely eliminated the rust problems that the all-steel tubular magazines had experienced which helped make the inexpensive Marlin rifle as durable as more expensive .22 caliber rifles.

    The Model 60 additionally featured a 16-groove rifled barrel, utilizing Marlin's trademarked Micro-Groove rifling technology, which had been developed in 1953. This rifling, with its precision-crowned muzzle, gave the Model 60 an inherent, enhanced accuracy over competing rifles, which used traditional deep grooved rifling, because the bullet was not as severely deformed while traveling down the barrel, and downrange.

    The Model 60 has a manual "fully open" bolt hold position, activated by pushing the charging handle inwards towards the gun when it is in the fully retracted, open breech position. To close the bolt with the manual bolt hold-open engaged, the charging handle must be pulled out, away from the gun, before the bolt will go forward. Since 1985, the Model 60 has also included a patented automatic "last-shot" bolt hold-open. This latter feature is a safety feature that locks the bolt half-way open after the last cartridge is fired, thereby allowing the safe inspection of the now-open action. This also notifies the user when the gun is empty.

    During the late-1980s, the capacity of the rifle was reduced to a 15-round maximum limit, to meet New Jersey's firearms law for semi-automatic assault weapons. For a few years in the mid-1980s the Model 60 rifles had both the "last shot hold open" feature and also held 18 rounds in the tube magazine. Those rifles with those two features are among the most sought after Model 60s.

    The redesigned magazine tube was visibly shorter than the barrel, which is how rifles from this period can be easily identified. Then, in the early 2000s the length of the barrel was reduced from 22 to 19 inches, to match the length of the reduced length magazine. This had the effect of reducing the length of the rifle from 40.5 to 37.5 inches.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 8, 2017
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  2. Dec 8, 2017 #2

    buster

    buster

    buster

    Awesome Friend Neighbor

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    I have one of these made in 1977. Still goes bang like it is supposed to. The new remlins model 60 are not even as good and they sure like to jam up.
     
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  3. Dec 8, 2017 #3

    Spikedriver

    Spikedriver

    Spikedriver

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    I haven't seen this happen. I've shot several and with good ammo like Mini-Mags, Golden bullets, or Super X, they run as reliably as a 10/22. But they don't like budget price crap ammo too well, i.e. leave the Thunderduds at home...
     
  4. Dec 8, 2017 #4

    buster

    buster

    buster

    Awesome Friend Neighbor

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    I have actually had the thunderduds jam very seldom compared to other ammo brands. I know many people say thunderduds are crap but they have proven to work better in most of my guns. Calibre super sonics made both my MKII and MKIV into jamamatics yet both guns had no problem with the thunderduds. The Super Sonics ran fine in my Ruger SR22 so like they say to each his own likes applies to guns also.
     
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  5. Dec 8, 2017 #5

    Spikedriver

    Spikedriver

    Spikedriver

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    Very true. I guess Thunderduds are kind of a convenient whipping boy for bad ammo. I should probably not make a broad statement like that.
     
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  6. Dec 8, 2017 #6

    buildit

    buildit

    buildit

    Hay Seed Scientist Neighbor HCL Supporter

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    I must have gotten my mod 60 in the 90's right before they went to crap. Mine will even shoot thunderbolts all day long, but then again it gets cleaned after every use because 22ammo is cheaply made. ;)
     
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  7. Feb 3, 2018 #7

    Fireman13

    Fireman13

    Fireman13

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    Thanks for the information Shooter13. I grew up shooting my dad's model 60. I always thought it fitting there was a squirrel on the stock as back in the early to mid 80's mom declared war on them because they kept destroying her bird feeders.
     
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  8. Aug 25, 2019 #8

    Fundy

    Fundy

    Fundy

    Somewhat known member Neighbor

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    Very nice! I have a Winchester semi-auto from the same era. It shoots cheap ammo very well, even old Remington High Velocity RL, predecessor to the GoldenTurds. It was a free brick.
     
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