My Saddle Hunting System

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Canon29

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
Joined
Nov 12, 2023
Messages
264
Location
Southern Appalachia
Hey folks- finished a big video it took me a few months to complete. It's an explanation of some of my mountain/wilderness survival/hunting techniques. It's got a ton of content packed in there and I annotated it heavily so if you want all the technical explanations your gonna need to us the pause button- if you're not into all that just ignore the text and keep watching. It starts off slow, but if you can manage to get past the basic explanation in the beginning I promise it gets more interesting in the 2nd half.

Oh- and it's all verticle so it's better to watch on your smartphone FYI.



Let me know what ya'll think.
 
I like the concept. I have been using a climbing treestand for 20 years, finally got one modified to do everything that I want. That being said I don't know if I have the desire to learn a new system... But I commend your effort.
 
I like the concept. I have been using a climbing treestand for 20 years, finally got one modified to do everything that I want. That being said I don't know if I have the desire to learn a new system... But I commend your effort.

I love dudes like yourself that have their systems tuned to their preferences! I'm critical of conventional systems because I'm attacking the problem from a weight constraint standpoint vs. What's currently being pushed at the market- for example trophyline just release their "hyperlite" magnesium climbing sticks. Only 16" and 17.5oz ea.

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They want $450- the comments from the folks promoting these is "I sure gotta hang onto these or they'll float away" 🤦‍♂️

I think conventional systems have their place- it just irks me when the saddle hunting industry claims to be innovative but makes their stuff just as heavy and expensive as the conventional treestands and its not as effective or comfortable in my opinion for the weight- I think the saddle segment fills a niche of being lightweight and fast/versatile but if you give those advantages up it just doesn't make sense to me why dudes would use them.

But seriously- alot if these setups are every bit as heavy as conventional treestands- just as expensive and in my opinion less capable considering all factors. The only thing the saddle segment provides given those limitations is a slightly less bulky system- and I think they are just leaving alot on the table compared to what's possible for the format.

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Just ridiculous!
---

So- don't take my stance the wrong way, I still have love for a good treestand, I just think that one should be getting more for what they pay in cost and weight if they depart from those proven methods. It's really more of a dig at the saddle industry than the conventional stuff.

One of my favorite hunters to learn from is Jason from traditional bowhunters and wilderness podcast- he is a big treestand guy (lonewolf) and the fact the he uses one doesn't in anyway diminish my respect for him- quite the contrary- he know what he likes and that's what he uses!
 
My stand is a combination of 2 API stands. I like the API, but I didn't like the way that it packed... so I took a Large API bow stand ( open front) seat and a platform from a narrow API closed front stand. The result is the base will now nests in on the seat and the seat padding is between my back and the base when packing out. To finish out my system I connected 2 carabiners to the hand extensions of the bow climber seat to form a climbing seat using a climbing belt. The climbing belt is also the securing strap when the platform is nested for packing. I have summit quick climbing stirrups attached to the base so it's easy to lock my feet in for climbing, even in the dark(I climb facing the tree). I have a set of summit saddle bags attached to the seat that act as a back pack with easy access to pockets and such even when climbing or in final hunting position. The pack is completed with padded shoulder harness that quick connect via carabiners. Everything is set up so there is no metal on metal contact (even when packing) making the system very quiet

The whole system is not a light as I would like, but it has room for my trimming saw and pruning shears, rain jacket, 2 insulated water bottles, field camo, field dressing kit, a coil of paracord, extra lights and compass, ammo in gun season, and even my lunch if need be...

It's rather comfortable and falling asleep on a quiet morning can be an issue. It fit's in the bed of my truck under the tonneau cover, so it stays there from fall through the end of winter hunting season (I do remove the water and perishables).
 
My stand is a combination of 2 API stands. I like the API, but I didn't like the way that it packed... so I took a Large API bow stand ( open front) seat and a platform from a narrow API closed front stand. The result is the base will now nests in on the seat and the seat padding is between my back and the base when packing out. To finish out my system I connected 2 carabiners to the hand extensions of the bow climber seat to form a climbing seat using a climbing belt. The climbing belt is also the securing strap when the platform is nested for packing. I have summit quick climbing stirrups attached to the base so it's easy to lock my feet in for climbing, even in the dark(I climb facing the tree). I have a set of summit saddle bags attached to the seat that act as a back pack with easy access to pockets and such even when climbing or in final hunting position. The pack is completed with padded shoulder harness that quick connect via carabiners. Everything is set up so there is no metal on metal contact (even when packing) making the system very quiet

The whole system is not a light as I would like, but it has room for my trimming saw and pruning shears, rain jacket, 2 insulated water bottles, field camo, field dressing kit, a coil of paracord, extra lights and compass, ammo in gun season, and even my lunch if need be...

It's rather comfortable and falling asleep on a quiet morning can be an issue. It fit's in the bed of my truck under the tonneau cover, so it stays there from fall through the end of winter hunting season (I do remove the water and perishables).

Pic please!
 

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