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outdoorman

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After many years of looking, I've acquired wood acreage in rural Georgia. On the 45+ acres, there is a 5 acre area where I want to start out with a simple campsite while deciding the type of simple structure and specific spot to place it . The 5 acres has a driveway to an unlivable mobile home that is being dismantled for removal. I am talking with a local person about clearing it of overgrown brush and pine and hardwood saplings.
I feel perplexed on what to do first and don't trust that I know enough as this is all new to me.
 

outdoorman

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Are you planning on living there now (24x7x365) or in the near future?
Not sure; when I'm there I enjoy it but I also really enjoy the coastal area (woods, fresh and salt water fishing) and good commuity where I live now so am uncertain if I will ever move there full-time. I can retire in less than 2 years so have a lot more time to spend there.
 

outdoorman

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I can think of many things to do with such a land. What are your long term goals with the land? How far of a commute is it to your present location? Camping on it is a good start to figure out the land and what it can offer.
It's good really pretty woods and very quiet yet less than 1/2 mile to a 4 lane highway that leads to Macon, Ga.
Only takes 20 minutes to get into downtown Macon.
I agree with camping to start with but also pondering either a garage or small shed might be a useful inexpensive addition that might fit well on it. My thoughts are what ever I build should be inexpensive and add value to any future build that might happen later on. With that in mind, I'm wondering if I need to consult someone for ideas where to place say a garage so that it would fit well if a home were built in the future.
I
 

Alaskajohn

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In Alaska, a lot of folks will use old Conex container as a temporary (or permanent) storage container. They are good to keep the bears out and offer better security than the other options, but they are unsightly. But they can be moved much easier than other structures.

I purchased a remote place in Alaska and early on I brought in an experienced contractor to look at the land and give me advice. Over the course of 6 plus years, I have hired him for work above my skills or available time. It was great having someone who understands the finer aspects of construction and what and were structures can efficiently or effectively be placed. It was also good to develop a logical sequence for projects that build upon each other.
 

Peanut

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I live on a farm in Northern Alabama but fairly close to the geographic region known as the coastal plain. Macon in on the coastal plain so I’ve very familiar with your land.

1) Water, do you have a year-round stream or creek on your property?

2) Well water. Do you have or know of water tests on or near your property.

2) History, you can learn a great deal about your property and the folks who owned it in the past. It’s safe to say Macon was settled long before electricity and modern conveniences. The people who first settled your land would have known how to best exploit the terrain and natural resources. Why learn it over again the hard way? A trip down memory lane could go a long way in helping you decide how best to use your land, where to locate structures, access roads and trails. The local library is the place to start exploring the history of your property.

3) Aerial photo’s have been taken of most of the south. These days satellite images are readily available. A bird’s eye view can lend a unique perspective to your land.

Just a few thoughts on what I would look into…
 

Meerkat

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It's good really pretty woods and very quiet yet less than 1/2 mile to a 4 lane highway that leads to Macon, Ga.
Only takes 20 minutes to get into downtown Macon.
I agree with camping to start with but also pondering either a garage or small shed might be a useful inexpensive addition that might fit well on it. My thoughts are what ever I build should be inexpensive and add value to any future build that might happen later on. With that in mind, I'm wondering if I need to consult someone for ideas where to place say a garage so that it would fit well if a home were built in the future.
I
Garage is what I had in mind, think that is a good idea long as its set up the house will be later.
 

Meerkat

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After many years of looking, I've acquired wood acreage in rural Georgia. On the 45+ acres, there is a 5 acre area where I want to start out with a simple campsite while deciding the type of simple structure and specific spot to place it . The 5 acres has a driveway to an unlivable mobile home that is being dismantled for removal. I am talking with a local person about clearing it of overgrown brush and pine and hardwood saplings.
I feel perplexed on what to do first and don't trust that I know enough as this is all new to me.
If you haven't purchased the land yet I'd do some investigating. Macon has its downfalls. But really pretty area. Only water i know of Chattahooche River,runs through Atlanta.Not saying its not good place just saying research.


Macon-Bibb considers buying land valued for $92K in 2019 for $8.75M
 

Neb

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After many years of looking, I've acquired wood acreage in rural Georgia. On the 45+ acres, there is a 5 acre area where I want to start out with a simple campsite while deciding the type of simple structure and specific spot to place it . The 5 acres has a driveway to an unlivable mobile home that is being dismantled for removal. I am talking with a local person about clearing it of overgrown brush and pine and hardwood saplings.
I feel perplexed on what to do first and don't trust that I know enough as this is all new to me.
Check any zoning laws that apply.

I put in a concrete driveway for the private forest I purchased 7 years ago. I received notice by the zoning people and informed me I had violated zoning rules because there was no house on the property which was required for me to put in a driveway. I had 3 days to correct the violation before having to pay a $1K/day fine. So I had to scramble to get a bobcat in to cover the driveway.

That mobile home may be your ticket to put in a garage barn shed.

Does the mobile home have a bathroom? A bear is allowed to sh1# in the woods but a human may run into legal issues if they do the same.

Does the mobile home have a septic tank?

Does the place have a well?

What does your retirement budget look like? If you start building on the property, taxes may go up. Barns and building are not cheap even if you do all of the work yourself.

"Farming the Forest" may be a good read. Ramps and ginseng may be viable.

Orchards need love and care to get them started. Deers are a nusence but can be controlled with tall fencing and deer netting. Bears will devastate orchards... electric fences can help.

Ben
 

outdoorman

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I live on a farm in Northern Alabama but fairly close to the geographic region known as the coastal plain. Macon in on the coastal plain so I’ve very familiar with your land.

1) Water, do you have a year-round stream or creek on your property?

2) Well water. Do you have or know of water tests on or near your property.

2) History, you can learn a great deal about your property and the folks who owned it in the past. It’s safe to say Macon was settled long before electricity and modern conveniences. The people who first settled your land would have known how to best exploit the terrain and natural resources. Why learn it over again the hard way? A trip down memory lane could go a long way in helping you decide how best to use your land, where to locate structures, access roads and trails. The local library is the place to start exploring the history of your property.

3) Aerial photo’s have been taken of most of the south. These days satellite images are readily available. A bird’s eye view can lend a unique perspective to your land.

Just a few thoughts on what I would look into…

There is an old well and septic system (for the long abandoned mobile home); A local contractor I had stop by looked at it and said the tank is missing; I going to have him come by and hook up a generator to see if the pump is functional. I know I will want water there. I have spoken with the county health department who says they can perform tests on water quality.
There is no creek or pond on the property, only a 'wet-weather creek' from drainage from the ridge top.
 

outdoorman

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If you haven't purchased the land yet I'd do some investigating. Macon has its downfalls. But really pretty area. Only water i know of Chattahooche River,runs through Atlanta.Not saying its not good place just saying research.


Macon-Bibb considers buying land valued for $92K in 2019 for $8.75M
Check any zoning laws that apply.

I put in a concrete driveway for the private forest I purchased 7 years ago. I received notice by the zoning people and informed me I had violated zoning rules because there was no house on the property which was required for me to put in a driveway. I had 3 days to correct the violation before having to pay a $1K/day fine. So I had to scramble to get a bobcat in to cover the driveway.

That mobile home may be your ticket to put in a garage barn shed.

Does the mobile home have a bathroom? A bear is allowed to sh1# in the woods but a human may run into legal issues if they do the same.

Does the mobile home have a septic tank?

Does the place have a well?

What does your retirement budget look like? If you start building on the property, taxes may go up. Barns and building are not cheap even if you do all of the work yourself.

"Farming the Forest" may be a good read. Ramps and ginseng may be viable.

Orchards need love and care to get them started. Deers are a nusence but can be controlled with tall fencing and deer netting. Bears will devastate orchards... electric fences can help.

Ben
Appreciate your comments
There is already a driveway from the mobile home residence on the property. I sold the mobile home to some local small investor who buys used mobile homes. It will be removed off the property.
I don't see myself getting into any debt over the property. My thoughts were to use local tradesman for what gets constructed on the property.
 

Meerkat

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Appreciate your comments
There is already a driveway from the mobile home residence on the property. I sold the mobile home to some local small investor who buys used mobile homes. It will be removed off the property.
I don't see myself getting into any debt over the property. My thoughts were to use local tradesman for what gets constructed on the property.
Maybe County TaxCollectors Office can answer your homestead questions?
 

Spikedriver

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My experience says try to figure up a rough estimate of what you think it'll cost. Then add 50%. There's always snags that add cost when revamping a disused property.

The Conex idea is workable. They can be bought cheap but transportation to your site will be expensive. On the plus side, it's not hard to add a door, a couple windows, and an A/C wall unit. My employer has them for offices in little used remote areas.

Beware of old wells. The well casings don't last forever, and if it fails you'll be looking at a minimum of several thousand dollars. TBH if I were you, I'd consider a new well if the current one is more than 50 or 60 years old. If you put in a new one, you'll never have to worry about water, and I think it's worth it even if you had to borrow a little...

Good luck! Keep us posted on your progress!
 

Neb

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My experience says try to figure up a rough estimate of what you think it'll cost. Then add 50%. There's always snags that add cost when revamping a disused property.

The Conex idea is workable. They can be bought cheap but transportation to your site will be expensive. On the plus side, it's not hard to add a door, a couple windows, and an A/C wall unit. My employer has them for offices in little used remote areas.

Beware of old wells. The well casings don't last forever, and if it fails you'll be looking at a minimum of several thousand dollars. TBH if I were you, I'd consider a new well if the current one is more than 50 or 60 years old. If you put in a new one, you'll never have to worry about water, and I think it's worth it even if you had to borrow a little...

Good luck! Keep us posted on your progress!

Agreed save borrowing.
.
Dave Ramsey follower.


Being debt free is freedom. "Owe no man nothing."

Ben
 

Spikedriver

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Agreed save borrowing.
.
Dave Ramsey follower.


Being debt free is freedom. "Owe no man nothing."

Ben
I'm a believer in no debt as well, but things like water are a necessity, and a good well adds value to the property. If the amount borrowed isn't outlandish I think it's a solid investment. It's not like financing a hot tub or a Ferrari...😁
 

Meerkat

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Best book I ever read about finance and getting ahead. And it is in plain simple format not using fancy Wall Street lango . I liked it so much I sent one to all our kids.

1602816482423.png
 

Caribou

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A trailer to start. Get a feel for the property, then draw up your plan. A friend built a large garage with a utility apartment at one end and a bedroom on the second floor. Then he built the main house.

You may want a greenhouse, or a barn, or, or, or... Get a basic idea of what you want and go for it in a logical manner.

A steel shipping container is a good way to start and with a great lock, relatively hard to get into for criminals. No windows or extra doors. Check your local codes, they all vary. Here a 20' container is legal without a permit if you put it on wooden blocks, pressure treated is fine. If you put it on cement blocks it is considered permanent it requires a permit and adds to the tax value of your property. This is the government, it doesn't need to make sense.

Staying out of debt is a great idea.
 

outdoorman

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My experience says try to figure up a rough estimate of what you think it'll cost. Then add 50%. There's always snags that add cost when revamping a disused property.

The Conex idea is workable. They can be bought cheap but transportation to your site will be expensive. On the plus side, it's not hard to add a door, a couple windows, and an A/C wall unit. My employer has them for offices in little used remote areas.

Beware of old wells. The well casings don't last forever, and if it fails you'll be looking at a minimum of several thousand dollars. TBH if I were you, I'd consider a new well if the current one is more than 50 or 60 years old. If you put in a new one, you'll never have to worry about water, and I think it's worth it even if you had to borrow a little...

Good luck! Keep us posted on your progress!
The well is not older than 23 yrs old. I'm hoping it is still good.
 

outdoorman

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A trailer to start. Get a feel for the property, then draw up your plan. A friend built a large garage with a utility apartment at one end and a bedroom on the second floor. Then he built the main house.

You may want a greenhouse, or a barn, or, or, or... Get a basic idea of what you want and go for it in a logical manner.

A steel shipping container is a good way to start and with a great lock, relatively hard to get into for criminals. No windows or extra doors. Check your local codes, they all vary. Here a 20' container is legal without a permit if you put it on wooden blocks, pressure treated is fine. If you put it on cement blocks it is considered permanent it requires a permit and adds to the tax value of your property. This is the government, it doesn't need to make sense.

Staying out of debt is a great idea.
I've thought about a shipping container as 20' ones are sold from nearby Macon so I don't think delivery would be much.
A concern is possible issue with condensation and humidity causing damage to stored equipment or goods.
 
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