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Purple Coneflower vs Echinacea

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lilmissy

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I am cleaning out flower beds and an old farmer years ago gave me a bunch of purple coneflower. Is this the same as Echinacea? Was going to save the seeds for a herb garden but wasnt sure if there is a difference.
 

Patchouli

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lilmissy it's the same to me. There are three distinct ones I was familiar with:
Echinacea angustifolia
Echinacea purpurea
Echinacea pallida
Some pretty photos found on wikipedia:

The spiny center of the head showing the paleae, from which the name derives

A bee on an Echinacea paradoxa head (inflorescence)

A bee on an Echinacea purpurea head
From wikipedia:
Echinacea species are herbaceous, drought-tolerant perennial plants growing up to 140 cm or 4 feet,[4] in height. They grow from taproots, except E. purpurea, which grows from a short caudex with fibrous roots. They have erect stems that in most species are unbranched. Both the basal and cauline (stem) leaves are arranged alternately.
 

Patchouli

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Maybe you would want to save roots as well. The Echinacea pallida has longer looking, narrow, paler petals than most echinacea. I've seen it growing wild along the country roadsides in Texas.
 

Weedygarden

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I think it is the same thing.
I did buy purple cone flower and many other things. I kept all of my starts on the front porch, until I could get them planted. Purple cone flower disappeared, along with a couple other plants waiting to be planted. I was going to put it in my herb garden. When I realized it had walked away, I couldn't find any more.
 

lilmissy

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Thanks all. I want to make some tinctures from my herb garden and didnt want to use the wrong plant. Patchhouli I am going to have to research using the root.
Weedy, I just dead headed a bunch I can send you some seeds if you like.
 

Weedygarden

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Do you think people or critters were the thieves?
Coneflower is the common name of Echinacea, Latin.
I think people. I live on a busy street, with lots of foot traffic. I've actually had plants dug out of my yard. I get that critters can damage or take plants. One of the things that was taken from my yard were blue columbine, the Colorado state flower. I went to the Columbine Memorial and dead headed a whole bunch of columbine seed heads. I scattered the seeds around my yard. Blue, purple, yellow, white, burgundy and pink columbine, all came up and bloomed. Blue columbine were there one day, gone the next. Everything else stayed. I planted some hen and chicks plants in the yard years ago. Came home from work in a day or two, all were gone. A squirrel might take one or two, but not a bunch. I planted some a few years ago, and the squirrels haven't touched them. Some people will come inside the fence, some will take only what they can reach from outside the fence.
I read a post about a family that had a beautiful apple tree and every year, someone would come and take the apples when the family was asleep (I think). The daughter of the people who stole the apples finally told them that her parents were the ones who stole their apples. The people were their "friends." I have no idea how they resolved that, or if they did.
 

Bacpacker

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I hate thieves

We got some coneflower growing in one of our beds this year. 2 plants and they got nice and bushy. Plenty of seed heads. Have harvested 2-3 so far, should get more soon. I do want to move it to another bed in the spring. Gonna build several this winter and want a 4x8 thats nothing but wildflowers and herbs
 

joel

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I had the bright Ideal to grow herbs to sale. So I studed them, not enongh money to make it worth the labor.
All Echinacea or corn flower are good for you, but the purple has more punch & the wild Purple (two wild varieties) Echinacea has more than the hybrid sold as corn flowers. You can get seeds for the two varieties, some people raise the plants for their roots & save the seeds.
Pot, Ginseng & Black walnut are the only plants that you can retire on, as for your own use, one has the room/land, then by all means grow them all. That is if they will grow where you live.
 

lilmissy

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I had the bright Ideal to grow herbs to sale. So I studed them, not enongh money to make it worth the labor.
All Echinacea or corn flower are good for you, but the purple has more punch & the wild Purple (two wild varieties) Echinacea has more than the hybrid sold as corn flowers. You can get seeds for the two varieties, some people raise the plants for their roots & save the seeds.
Pot, Ginseng & Black walnut are the only plants that you can retire on, as for your own use, one has the room/land, then by all means grow them all. That is if they will grow where you live.
What do you use black walnut for?
 

joel

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You are here: Home / Foraging / How to Make Black Walnut Tincture (and Powder)
HOW TO MAKE BLACK WALNUT TINCTURE (AND POWDER)
November 9, 2018 by Ashley Adamant 25 Comments
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A black walnut tincture is easy to make at home, and all it takes is a fresh supply of ripe black walnuts. The walnuts themselves will still be perfectly good to eat since a black walnut tincture is made using the green outer husk rather than the nut itself. The resulting tincture is used to purge parasites and as a topical anti-bacterial. It also has the added benefit of being an emergency iodine supplement.
Black Walnut Tincture


HARVESTING BLACK WALNUTS
Unless you have a backyard nut tree, you’ve likely never seen the green husk on a walnut. It’s a fleshy coating that grows outside of the nut itself. Inside you’ll find a hard nutshell, and then inside that is the nut meat. By the time walnuts reach the supermarkets, the soft fruit like outer coating has already been removed.


Black walnuts fall from trees right around the first fall frost. In Central Vermont that happens in mid-October, but they’re harvested a bit earlier in northern areas and later further south. Black walnut grow wild in the eastern half of the United States, and they make up whole forests in some areas. They’re a tasty cold hardy nut tree, so they’re commonly planted even in areas outside their wild range.
Beyond their nuts, black walnuts trees are one of more than two dozen trees that can be tapped for syrup, just like maples. That’s just one more great reason to plant a black walnut tree. The nuts themselves are tasty, although they have a higher tannin content than the Persian walnuts you find in the stores these days.
Black walnuts taste best if the green hulls are removed as soon as possible so they don’t leach into the nut and make them bitter. Since the outer husk of black walnuts is almost always a discarded waste product, a homemade black walnut tincture is a great way to put it to use.
Black Walnuts in Hulls

BLACK WALNUT TINCTURE USES
I first learned about black walnut tincture as a natural remedy for intestinal parasites. A friend was trying to treat her dog’s intestinal worms without resorting to harsh prescription de-wormer. While I can’t speak to black walnut tincture’s supposed safety with pets, I know that it worked in this case.


In humans, a black walnut tincture is most commonly used for that same purpose. Besides it’s used as an anti-parasitic agent, a black walnut tincture is also anti-fungal and anti-bacterial due to the high levels of tannins extracted from the black walnut hulls.
 

joel

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The money is in the nut meat until the trees are manture & are cut for timber. An acre can net $200,000.00 to $400,000.00, but most trees go for
$75,000.00 an acre after 30-60 years. Ginseng & blueberries will grow near Blackwalnut trees, but over 200 plant will not, tomatoes & roses are two plant that will die near a Black walnut tree.
 

Patchouli

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Even tho this is an echinacea thread, since we're chiming in on black walnut...
I've used it in tincture on plantar's warts of one of my offspring.
It is an ingredient in a healing mix of herbs for the bones, ligaments, tendons, along with white oak, skullcap and a few other healing herbs.
But I hate the way black walnut smells, and tastes.
It is a beautiful lumber.
 

joel

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Sorry i did that & did not mean to hijack the thread.
I am thinking about growing the echinacea for their colors & to have the purple echinacea for other uses.
 

lilmissy

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Hi jack the thread, I want to learn it all. Thanks for the tincture info
i always thought black walnut was only good for ring worm and hair dye. We have a good many trees on our property. cleaned a bunch one year for the walnut, yuk. That taste is not for me.
 

Peanut

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Native people in North America used echinacea for snakebite...

If you are bitten by a venomous snake or spider and you can’t get to a doctor, what do you do? It’s a subject barely touched by survival manuals simply because they don’t have real answers. When someone does mention it in a book… It’s like someone running barefoot over hot coals, they can’t wait until it’s over...

Back to snake bites… Several years ago I was supposed to attend a wilderness emergency medicine class taught by Sam up in NC. I knew snake bites were supposed to be covered in the class...

The most important herb I would add is Echinacea, yes, echinacea, it’s not just for colds. It’s a very powerful medicine with many uses. The Sioux used it for rattlesnake bites as did many tribes. It has an incredible ability to clear toxic heat and cleanse the blood. It greatly decreases inflammation and cellular permeability. It actually helps a cell block out venom.

A side note… Blackeyed Susans, a common roadside flower with many of the same characteristics as Echinacea because they are cousins. However, it’s a lot less potent than echinacea. It would be necessary to use a lot more of it. I know the Cherokee used blackeyed susans in a pinch when they couldn’t find echinacea.


All this said… if I’m bitten by a pit viper I will go to the ER. However, I will stop on the way and gather all the Sida, Yarrow and Selfheal I can eat along with Echinacea.
 
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