Queen Annes Lace, good.....Hemlock, not so good!

Discussion in 'Natural Remedies' started by VenomJockey, Jul 31, 2018.

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  1. Jul 31, 2018 #1

    VenomJockey

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    Here's how to tell the difference...

    http://www.askaprepper.com/how-to-t...-healing-queen-annes-lace-and-deadly-hemlock/

    Exxcerpt: "The edible and healing Queen Anne’s Lace is a member of the same family as the poisonous Hemlock and the plants look similar. You should always be sure of your identification before using a plant, but in this case the stakes are very high. We will go through the differences here to help you identify both plants."
     
  2. Jul 31, 2018 #2

    Peanut

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    Here is my post on QAL - queen ann's lace... wild carrots, an ancient purifier.

    There are actually 6 species of poisonous hemlock growing in Namerica... They all are in the same plant family as QAL... Apiaceae... closely related cousins.

    Thankfully only one poison cousin looks almost identical to QAL... Conium maculatum -poison hemlock, deadly.

    Equally and thankfully... it is easy to tell them apart... You only have to remember one thing which I teach in my classes...

    "Queen Ann has hairy Legs" repeat this three times... now you know...

    Now the two plants I post here look very different. In real life, many times they look almost identical, especially the leaves... The reason I chose these two photo's is because the very simple difference in the two plants is easy to see.... Queen Ann has hairy legs, Queen Ann has hairy legs, Queen Ann has hairy legs.

    Look at these two photos, which one is Queen Ann's Lace and which one is poison hemlock... A no-brainer...

    1 QAL.jpg Poison hemlock_v1.png
     
  3. Jul 31, 2018 #3

    Meerkat

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    I haven't seen any of either or those plants.
    What natives here we had seemed to have disappeared. We had Passion Flowers aka may pops, poke salad, plums, muskadines etc.
    In past 10 or 15 years all are gone now. Muscadine vines are here but never produced a grape since we have been here. .
     
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  4. Jul 31, 2018 #4

    VThillman

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    Queen Anne's Lace was one of the herbs my 'friend of our youth' collected and sold by mail to a west coast buyer. Only other herb I remember was ginseng, but he also collected princess pine - probably for a different buyer.
     
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  5. Jan 4, 2019 #5

    Patchouli

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    Queen Ann has hairy legs, but no mention of the scent of the flowers, which I remember very distinctly, and the smell of the stem and how fibrous the stem is. In those differences, how similar is it to the poison hemlock?
    When looking at your photos, I kept looking at the hairy legged one thinking that is QAL, because I've never seen poison hemlock flowers and foliage. Sometimes i think people were born yesterday.
    edited to add: I mean people who can't tell poison specimens from lookalikes, not referring to you, Peanut.
     
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  6. Jan 4, 2019 #6

    Meerkat

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    Patch your referring to me when it comes to these kinds of flowers,:D thanks fro the warning,:huggs:
     
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  7. Jan 4, 2019 #7

    Patchouli

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    But Meerkat, I don't think you would willynilly pick a flower and start eating it. I think you would say, "it is so pretty but looks too much like that poisonous one, so I will not pick it."
     
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  8. Jan 4, 2019 #8

    Meerkat

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    Patch thanks for the confidence in me,:D
     
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  9. Jan 4, 2019 #9

    Patchouli

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    :D Now that you know...besides I don't think either plant grows in your area.
     
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  10. Jan 4, 2019 #10

    zoomzoom

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  11. Jan 4, 2019 #11

    Meerkat

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    My goodness! I know I got into some sumac and poison ivey at same time and dr LOL when he saw me. He apologized and said he had never seen such a bad case of it before.
    Clearing vines off a fence in shorts and halter top had them wrapped all around me.



     
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  12. Jan 4, 2019 #12

    zoomzoom

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    Pics or it didn't happen. :)
     
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  13. Jan 8, 2019 #13

    viking

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    I believe princess pine is also called pipsissewa and it is used in making one brand of fancy root beer.
     
  14. Jan 8, 2019 #14

    viking

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    Queen Ann Lace stalks are solid and I believe that hemlock stalks and stems are tubular as is cow parsnips, which actually look far more like hemlock that Queen Ann does.
     
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