The Hunger Gap

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Survivor_316

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Sep 30, 2022
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The What's For Dinner thread got me thinking- for those of us who live in an area where we experience a Hunger Gap (Or "Hungry Gap," depending on where you live), what do you grow in your cold frames or to overwinter that will fill the gap?

Of course, hopefully we all have enough food stored for that time, but I like to think in terms of how I would survive if stores were all gone, too. Storing varieties of beans, grains, potatoes, squash, etc. are essential.

We are trying some new varieties here this year that I'm hoping will be good fresh foods during that time:

Prestige Cauliflower- long dtm, overwintering
White Queen Leaf Parsley- short dtm, but overwinter
Green in Snow Mustard-Grows during winter
Spring Rapini Broccoli Rabe- I have grown but never overwintered.
Giant Winter Leek
Buck's Horn Plantain- perennial
Salad Burnet- perennial
Red Core Chantenay Carrot- good for winter cilultivation and harvest

Most of these are from Adaptive Seeds.

Others we grow- Miner's lettuce, corn salad, brassicas, lettuces, radicchio. I'm not big on any root crops other than carrots and potatoes, but I do grow them.

Any overwintering things you grow for early spring when not much is ready? Any wild edibles like spring beauties that you would plan to harvest? Recipes? If love to hear your thoughts.
 
The What's For Dinner thread got me thinking- for those of us who live in an area where we experience a Hunger Gap (Or "Hungry Gap," depending on where you live), what do you grow in your cold frames or to overwinter that will fill the gap?

Of course, hopefully we all have enough food stored for that time, but I like to think in terms of how I would survive if stores were all gone, too. Storing varieties of beans, grains, potatoes, squash, etc. are essential.

We are trying some new varieties here this year that I'm hoping will be good fresh foods during that time:

Prestige Cauliflower- long dtm, overwintering
White Queen Leaf Parsley- short dtm, but overwinter
Green in Snow Mustard-Grows during winter
Spring Rapini Broccoli Rabe- I have grown but never overwintered.
Giant Winter Leek
Buck's Horn Plantain- perennial
Salad Burnet- perennial
Red Core Chantenay Carrot- good for winter cilultivation and harvest

Most of these are from Adaptive Seeds.

Others we grow- Miner's lettuce, corn salad, brassicas, lettuces, radicchio. I'm not big on any root crops other than carrots and potatoes, but I do grow them.

Any overwintering things you grow for early spring when not much is ready? Any wild edibles like spring beauties that you would plan to harvest? Recipes? If love to hear your thoughts.

I grew up in the northern regions. My mother had my father make planters indoors (basement) with grow lights. She grew simple things like peas, lettuce, beans etc.
 
Even with grow lights, my plants get too leggy inside. My grow lights must not be very great.

I don't remember what they were called, but there was a special kind of bulb she used...it was a faint pink/purple....and they were on an adjustable chain so that she could slowly lift them as the plants grew, but, they were never too far from the tops if I remember correctly...and I think she used to "pinch" off the tops at the beginning so that they grew out rather than up.
 
We can enjoy the funny side of winter here. The winters are not so harsh any more, the grass stays green, carrots stay in the ground till needed to be harvested, root cellar helps, pumpkin, squash, potatos and apples store well. The canned fruits and veggies, canned meats and lots of boullion to add to rice, noodles and beans rounds up the food needs in winter. We have not tried to grow indoors yet, but the 60 ft. long and 4 ft. wide greenhouse will give us a great place to try if needed....
 
I don't remember what they were called, but there was a special kind of bulb she used...it was a faint pink/purple....and they were on an adjustable chain so that she could slowly lift them as the plants grew, but, they were never too far from the tops if I remember correctly...and I think she used to "pinch" off the tops at the beginning so that they grew out rather than up.
I will try that! Thanks!
 
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