Tips of all kinds!

Discussion in 'Frugal Household tips' started by Weedygarden, Jan 7, 2019.

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  1. Mar 29, 2019 #61

    Sewingcreations15

    Sewingcreations15

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    @masterspark try hot water and soap first and if that doesn't work then use some peroxide. If the steps are in the sun leave the peroxide on there for a while (the sunlight helps it work) and then scrub and wash off otherwise it will bleach your granite. Don't use vinegar as it will pit the granite. Let me know how you go
     
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  2. Mar 29, 2019 #62

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

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    One time I removed rust stains from a counter top just using cleanser with bleach in it. It worked like a charm, but the stains on your steps have probably been there longer and might be deeper. I have never used peroxide for removing rust stains as Sewing suggests, but I'd bet that works as well.
     
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  3. Mar 29, 2019 #63

    hiwall

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    I do have an idea that will completely remove any stain but you will need one of these. :)
    masalta_cement_mixer_placeholder_01_1.jpg
     
  4. Mar 29, 2019 #64

    SheepDog

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    I used one of those when I made the ramp from the garage back door to the back yard. It was the easy part! Making and setting the forms, building the rebar cage and laying the reinforcing wire was the hard part. It took 2000 pounds of concrete forty feet of 3/8 rebar and 12 feet of 4x4 wire screen to build a 4.5 x 6 foot ramp. It will last forever but it was one of the hardest jobs I have ever done.
     
  5. Mar 29, 2019 #65

    backlash

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    Cement work is what almost all of my family did. My Dad took me to work with him one summer. I joined the Navy just as soon as I could. I knew cement finisher was not a job title I wanted to have.
     
  6. Mar 29, 2019 #66

    Bacpacker

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    Finishing cement is an art I think. I had an uncle that worked concrete from when he got back from Germany in WWII till he retired. He was really good and and could make a floor look like a plate. Or texture it for ultimate grip.
     
  7. Mar 29, 2019 #67

    backlash

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    My dad and brothers were masters at cement finishing. They never had a problem finding a job and were always given the most complicated projects.
    I figure if it gets hard and is mostly flat that's good enough. The only thing I ever poured was a floor for a dog kennel and the dog didn't complain so I was good. :)
    The biggest problem with cement work is it destroys your body. I know a lot of finishers and they are all broken down. Bad knees are the main problem.
     
  8. Apr 7, 2019 #68

    Caribou

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    Zero wind this AM and the first time in a couple weeks so I went out early to burn the trash. I leave my BBQ butane lighter in the Side-by-Side so it is available. There was still frost on everything so the lighter was a bit cranky. I grabbed the nose of the lighter and held the base of the lighter in the exhaust for a minute or two while slowly turning it. The butane warmed enough to be happy and I got my fire going. Putting the lighter inside my coat works also but takes longer.
     
  9. Apr 7, 2019 #69

    GrannyG

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    For the homeschoolers...[​IMG]
     
  10. Apr 14, 2019 #70

    Spikedriver

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    Plastic chewing tobacco tins work great for small parts storage. I knew an old farmer that had a piece of 2x4 on his shop bench with about a dozen of them screwed to it. He just put a little screw right through the bottom of each one and Presto! Instant organizer for small nuts, screws, and washers. Each one had a bit of masking tape marked with a Sharpie for a label describing what was supposed to be in it.
     
  11. Apr 14, 2019 #71

    Sewingcreations15

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    @Spikedriver as do glass jars with plastic or metal screw top lids, just screw the lid to a piece of wood and fill container with bits and pieces and screw back onto the wood where the lid is. This way all your nuts, bolts etc are easy to see as well or you can use transparent plastic bottles too.
     
  12. Apr 14, 2019 #72

    hiwall

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    I have about 50+ clear plastic jars screwed to the ceiling in my shop full of "things".
     
  13. Apr 14, 2019 #73

    Spikedriver

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    Never know when you might need a "thing"...I might have a couple "thing" jars around my place too. ;)
     
  14. Apr 14, 2019 #74

    SheepDog

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    I have three "small parts" cabinets with springs, rods, balls, nuts, bolts and screws. Then I have plastic boxes with zerk fittings, O-rings, snap rings and clips.
    Boxes of wire on spools, connectors and sheathing for cables. All the bits and parts one might need for a repair or replacement.
     
  15. Apr 16, 2019 #75

    Patchouli

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    15554150825681449613483.jpg Ya know those shorter strings of battery operated party lights you can find at wally world, Michael's, etc.? I had bought some for decor at a wedding but they weren't used so I didn't get to find out how long lasting the batteries (3 new double aa) were. Ive been using them in the bedroom and bathroom for at least 3 months. They do turn off after so many hours, you can simply flip the tiny switch.
    I liked the ones on a rope for the rustic cowboy look.
     

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