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Trigger Work on a Redhawk 44 Mag.

Discussion in 'Gunsmithing' started by RevV, Apr 18, 2018.

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  1. Apr 18, 2018 #1

    RevV

    RevV

    RevV

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    Hello friends. I am looking at getting a used Ruger Redhawk 44 mag. My only 44 mag. experience has been with a friend’s S&W Model 29.

    A few reviewers mention that Redhawks profit from a little trigger work. Do any of you have advice about specific trigger modifications, replacement parts, trigger kits, etc. for a Redhawk? Or is it just a matter of polishing?

    Thank you in advance for sharing your wisdom.
     
    Bacpacker, Caribou, SHOOTER13 and 3 others like this.
  2. Apr 19, 2018 #2

    msharley

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    Hey Rev,

    There are several vids on YouTube.

    TAKE YOUR TIME!

    Rugers are "trial & error"....

    The S&W one can take the sideplate off and "look" at the innards...

    Wish you well.

    Later, Mark
     
    Caribou, RevV and (deleted member) like this.
  3. Apr 20, 2018 #3

    RevV

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    Thank you, Mark!

    I was not looking to do the work myself. I don't have the money to make mistakes, so I use a good gunsmith.
    He put a PowderRiver Precision trigger and sear kit in an XD .45 for me and several Cajun GunWorks improvements
    in my Canik C100.

    I am wondering if there are ready-to-go trigger kits or standard modifications for the Ruger Redhawk 44 Mag.
    or whether it's ART, rather than drop-in parts.

    If you know, please share your wisdom.
     
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  4. Apr 20, 2018 #4

    msharley

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    Hey Rev,

    The guys I know, that work on the Rugers, all say it is "slow going"...as revolver has to be fully assembled to "try"...

    Not sure what aftermarket parts are on hand for Ruger Revolvers. (Lots of them for the MK II, MK III and 10/22) ??

    Your Gunsmith will have a better idea.....

    Keep us posted....


    Later, Mark
     
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  5. Apr 20, 2018 #5

    RevV

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    Thanks, Mark.
    Will talk to my gunsmith and see what he suggests. I plan to shoot it to see how the trigger feels with live ammo.
    It might not need any work. I just wanted to know what my options are.
     
  6. Apr 20, 2018 #6
  7. Apr 21, 2018 #7

    SeventiesWreckers

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    My Grandfather liked Rugers, and owned a .44 Mag Redhawk, and several Blackhawks also. I shot his .44 Redhawk occasionally on range trips, but mostly at distance firing on S/A. The D/A pull was heavier than my Model 29, but I don't remember it being an issue of much note, and just wrote it off to the obvious robust design. As I recall it had coil springs, and a single spring worked the hammer & trigger, with no adjustment. Not really an issue I cared about, because I was shooting distance silhouette comps at the time, and S/A was all I ever used, and I was shooting a Model 29 anyway. My Grandfather passed in 1995, and all his firearms came to me. I kept the Redhawk for a few years, & ended up giving it to my Nephew, who liked it quite a lot. It's a fine revolver, and even if the action is a little stout, he hasn't seemed to notice it enough to mention.

    The thing about used revolvers though, is that "used" is such a subjective term. The Redhawks were an extra robust design, and were touted as being able to handle the most powerful loads, which was no doubt true. But when they came out in the late 1970's, the heaviest grain weight bullets we had loading tables for in .44 Magnum were 240 Grain. I bought some Hornady FMJ 265 Grain bullets to handload, but held off loading them for a few years till there was more published crossover data. That would have been mid 1980's. These days grain weights over 300 are commonplace, and loaded to move at Magnum velocities. So, I'm not really sure if when Ruger first made the statement that the Redhawk in .44 Magnum would handle anything loaded in that caliber, they were considering bullets in grain weights that didn't exist yet. Everything has design limits, where that might be for a Redhawk is beyond my best guess, but it's out there somewhere. Without knowing the providence of a particular revolver, the best you can do is to just look for overall wear, and pay special attention to the breech face around the firing pin, and of course how the cylinder locks up. Also, a Gunsmith to look it over, that has experience with Ruger Magnum Revolvers would be a good idea. Best of luck, & I hope you find a keeper in pristine shape that was somebody's safe queen.
     
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  8. Apr 21, 2018 #8

    RevV

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  9. Apr 21, 2018 #9

    RevV

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    SeventiesWreckers, thanks for the tips!

    Right now the Redhawk I am considering belongs to a friend who has several 44 Mags. He shoots his 29s and his Anaconda much more than the Redhawk, so it might be fairly pristine, if he is the original owner. I will find out.
     
  10. Apr 22, 2018 #10

    SeventiesWreckers

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    Sounds like a plan. I hope it's in great shape & you make a fine addition. Best of luck there.
     
    Caribou, msharley, RevV and 2 others like this.
  11. Aug 5, 2019 #11

    ssonb

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    I have worked on the Ruger Blackhawks and let me tell ya Ruger has a way all their own when it comes to the internal engineering!!! Take pictures on every stage when you dissemble It will off in spades on the return trip.
     
  12. Aug 5, 2019 #12

    viking

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    Shortly after I got my Redhawk I ordered all the springs available from Ruger, just in case. I did take one turn out of the trigger/hammer spring and made sure the cylinder was exactly timed. I also honed the shear and in the end the revolver is really far more accurate than my capabilities but when I would go deer hunting with the Redhawk I changed the prospective of how I would sight it, I would always try to consider where I sighted in as if it were a very small stone, it may sound strange but it worked and I have killed many deer with head and neck shots. I still remember the first buck I shot and to this day I'm sure I just pointed and shot, without even using the sights, when I dressed out the deer I found that I had broke it's spine. This is all nothing due to my great prowess as a shooter, the fact is that I had done a lot of practice with the Redhawk and it had become intuitive in my hands. All these years later, I'm not so sure I could do as well, but if I could only have one firearm it would probably be the Redhawk. It still locks up as tight as it did when I bought it and that's with all the full power loads that have been through it since the early 1980's. The only thing negative I can say about it is that it is rather heavy and you need to have a good holster for it to be comfortable to carry, I have two that do pretty good, one is a leather holster I made originally for a Super Blackhawk but was able to reform for the Redhawk and the other is an Uncle Mike's nylon shoulder holster that was made for the Redhawk.
     
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  13. Aug 5, 2019 #13

    Caribou

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    Ruger makes fine firearms and their revolvers are made like tanks. Ask your buddy if there has been any trigger work done on it already. I'd guess that there is a fair chance that this work has already been done, if it was necessary.
     
  14. Aug 5, 2019 #14

    Amish Heart

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    I have a Redhawk 44, but don't carry it. I'll look into the shoulder holster. It's a great revolver.
     
  15. Aug 6, 2019 #15

    RevV

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    I ended up getting a Super Redhawk 44 mag. and I LOVE it.
     
  16. Aug 6, 2019 #16

    RevV

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    Here's the SRH. Produced in 1989 according to Ruger serial number search, but almost no wear and the lock up is tighter than on the brand new one that my LGS had in stock.
     
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  17. Aug 7, 2019 #17

    SheepDog

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    The Super Redhawk in 454 is on my wish list. It allows loads from light 45 colt to tank busting 65K psi loads from the 454 Casull. :sarcasm: on the "tank busting" part.
     
  18. Aug 12, 2019 #18

    RevV

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    I considered the 454. It's a great round and the ability to shoot .45 Colt is a plus.
    I have friends who own 454s, 460s, and 500s. I shoot a cylinder or 2 of those every chance I get,
    but .44 Mag. is the biggest round I can comfortably and enjoyably shoot for more than a few cylinders.
     
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  19. Aug 13, 2019 #19

    ssonb

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    If you reload you can customize the 454s down to a 45lc magnum level instead of the normal 454 cannon experience!!
     
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  20. Aug 13, 2019 #20

    Sentry18

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    I am late to the party but my advice when it comes to triggers, especially revolver triggers, is to consider a reputable reduced power spring kit and/or just keep shooting it. It's amazing range time will smooth out a trigger.
     
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  21. Aug 14, 2019 #21

    ssonb

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    The springs are the easiest and the most effective, after the spring change of there is still issued and you are determined to tackle the job to polish and smooth you will need stones, a good bench, lights and magnification.
     
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  22. Nov 29, 2019 #22

    SheepDog

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    When I did the trigger work on my Security-Six I just coated the parts with tooth paste (the old white kind) and fired it until I was numb. Washed off the tooth paste and lubed it and then dry fired it to see the improvement. It took about a week to get the double action trigger smoothed out and a couple of days to get the single action nice. I have used stones and jigs on other triggers but the Ruger was a lot easier to work in the gun. You could use jewelers rouge or a baking soda and water paste just as well but I am really happy with my trigger after using tooth paste. It also helped get rid of any flinch that was developing. Dry firing it works well as long as you do it correctly. Balancing acoin on the front site teaches you to pull the trigger smoothly whether you pull fast or slow.
    My new Gp100 is pretty good without trigger work and I doubt I will be doing anything but shoot it. (clean and lubricate it) shoot, clean and lube (rinse and repeat).
     
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