Warm winter boots

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Curmudgeon

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Mickey Mouse boots, hands down for keeping your feet warm. The downside is they are a bit bulky and, depending on what you are doing, could be susceptible to being torn on the outer layer.

I can wear a pair of thin socks inside mine and can sit out on the ice, fishing, all day long, and then some.
 

Sourdough

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Baffin Boots. And at 60 Below zero F* toe warmers and Baffin Boots.
 

Cabin Fever

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Mickey Mouse boots, hands down for keeping your feet warm. The downside is they are a bit bulky and, depending on what you are doing, could be susceptible to being torn on the outer layer.

I can wear a pair of thin socks inside mine and can sit out on the ice, fishing, all day long, and then some.
LOL! I can hear it now. People telling @lilmissy kids, "Your mother wears Army boots!"

Some of the better brands are Baffin, Sorel, Danner, and Rocky.

My wife's favorite winter footwear are her Steger Mukluks. She is in the center of the photo below.
1637508729071.png

Steger makes mukluks for men, too.
1637508801686.png
 

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Some of the better brands are Baffin, Sorel, Danner, and Rocky.
Agreed.
I'll also add Irish Setter to the list. I have Baffin, Sorel and maybe a pair of Rocky.
Although I have those, my personal favorite is the Muck brand Arctic boots. They're slide on's with no lacing or otherwise. Super waterproof. If it's above about 50° they're too warm. Being tall and super waterproof, they're great when in deep snow, slush and such.
 

Alaskajohn

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Baffin boots are the absolute best for extreme cold. Hands down no question. If it’s extremely cold this is what I am wearing.

For cold down to about -15, I like the Sorel Caribou snow boots.

When the temps are in the teens or above I have some nice Danner boots that I’ll wear.
 

lilmissy

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Holy moly, thanks all. I have to say only ever heard of Sorels and Red Wing. Gotta look all those other ones up.
I mostly just want them to go outside and walk in the snow through the woods, if there is now, if not walking through the muck, stack firewood, go to chicken coop. We are those that are more outside in the winter than the summer.
@Cabin Fever, my winter jacket that I go outside in, not the store is a military parke N . It has rips all over it, no fur around the hood. But it is sooooo warm, I am on a mission to find one for myself. Love it.
 

Cabin Fever

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Holy moly, thanks all. I have to say only ever heard of Sorels and Red Wing. Gotta look all those other ones up.
I mostly just want them to go outside and walk in the snow through the woods, if there is now, if not walking through the muck, stack firewood, go to chicken coop. We are those that are more outside in the winter than the summer.
@Cabin Fever, my winter jacket that I go outside in, not the store is a military parke N . It has rips all over it, no fur around the hood. But it is sooooo warm, I am on a mission to find one for myself. Love it.
US military surplus clothing is the warmest, toughest, long-lasting clothing I have. I own a M65 jacket with liner, two fishtail coats with liners, an WW2 OD anorak, and a vintage N3B snorkel parka with real fur trim.
 

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I mostly just want them to go outside and walk in the snow through the woods, if there is now, if not walking through the muck, stack firewood, go to chicken coop.
OK, with those things in mind, another factor is weight. If you're doing a lot of walking or whatever, you don't want heavy boots as they'll tire you out.
Not quite winter here yet so I don't have my boots out but as I recall, my Baffin's and Muck Boots are the lightest followed closely by the Sorel's. The Red Wing's and Irish Setters were much heavier.
 

Spikedriver

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OK, with those things in mind, another factor is weight. If you're doing a lot of walking or whatever, you don't want heavy boots as they'll tire you out.
Not quite winter here yet so I don't have my boots out but as I recall, my Baffin's and Muck Boots are the lightest followed closely by the Sorel's. The Red Wing's and Irish Setters were much heavier.
Muck Boots are really good. Colombia Bugabootoo boots aren't bad but to really stay warm when it's nasty cold outside you'll need heavy wool socks.

LacCrosse Burly rubber boots are very good too but I'm not sure if they come in women's sizes.
 

Tirediron

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Has the quality of Muck boots gone back up?, I had a pair years ago, loved them, the next pair was the last, pair, but my baffins will breakdown some day,
 

joel

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I have muck boots that are steel toes & have a booty made of 1/2" felt liner, but they are to hot for South Carolina. We do not get snow, so they are in storage..................................................for now.
 

Morgan101

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I guess I am fortunate that my feet seldom get cold, and I don't live in an area where the temperature is extremely cold for long periods of time. Maybe number two is the reason for number one. I can wear almost any kind of footwear with good socks, and stay warm. If I do have to trudge through snow my go-to's would be LaCrosse. Excellent quality, and very comfortable. I think LaCrosse owns Danner, but I am not sure.
 

Rebecca

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Has the quality of Muck boots gone back up?, I had a pair years ago, loved them, the next pair was the last, pair, but my baffins will breakdown some day,
Not sure I would call it high quality. I go through a pair of Muck boots a year. But if that's their quality or my lifestyle I'm not sure. I get them because they are the only winter boots with a steel toe I can find that fit me.

Anyone got suggestions on other winter boots with steel toes?
 

joel

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I was always hard on boots, but chopping wood & working animals every day will wear most any boot out.
 

Sourdough

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Morgan101

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Not sure I would call it high quality. I go through a pair of Muck boots a year. But if that's their quality or my lifestyle I'm not sure. I get them because they are the only winter boots with a steel toe I can find that fit me.

Anyone got suggestions on other winter boots with steel toes?
That seems to be a tough call. You can get good work boots or good Winter boots, but they don't seem to mix the two for Women. Here is a good video on several brands. Timberland seems to have a design that covers both, and is made for women. You might check the other brands to see if they have a women's offering. I think if you fast forward to about the 7:30 mark you will get to Timberland. Good Luck!

 

Spikedriver

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Check out Lehigh boots. I think they've got a pretty fair selection of women's winter work boots. Also, if you're willing to pay the cost, I'm sure White's boots has something. It'll be $500 but they'll last longer than you will.

Alternatively you could get insulated overboots. My employer provides studded LaCrosse overboots. They're heavy and clumsy but they are freaking warm and they're waterproof...
 

viking

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While in the Air Force, I was stationed up in Anchorage, Alaska, we were issued white inflatable boots, they had an air valve on them to inflate them by mouth, even with minus temps I couldn't stand to wear them as they were just too hot, however they'd probably be great for sub zero snowmobiling and survival.
 

Spikedriver

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While in the Air Force, I was stationed up in Anchorage, Alaska, we were issued white inflatable boots, they had an air valve on them to inflate them by mouth, even with minus temps I couldn't stand to wear them as they were just too hot, however they'd probably be great for sub zero snowmobiling and survival.
A local sporting goods store has a military surplus department, they always have those for sale. They're used and always look kind of yellow colored with age. I've often wondered if it would be worth buying a pair...
 

Caribou

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A local sporting goods store has a military surplus department, they always have those for sale. They're used and always look kind of yellow colored with age. I've often wondered if it would be worth buying a pair...
Yes!


I like my Sorels. One of the advantages is that they have removable liners. I pull the liners out at night to let the boot completely dry. I put one of my spare sets of liners in the next day so that my boots start out really dry.

Mukluks traditionally had dry grass in them for insulation. Today the Eskimos build their mukluks around boot liners so a few boot liners could come in handy.
 

Sourdough

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While in the Air Force, I was stationed up in Anchorage, Alaska, we were issued white inflatable boots, they had an air valve on them to inflate them by mouth, even with minus temps I couldn't stand to wear them as they were just too hot, however they'd probably be great for sub zero snowmobiling and survival.
You were "WRONGLY" informed about that. The valve is for "ONLY" one reason. You put the boots on, and then gain altitude (either buy climbing, driving, or un-pressurized aircraft) You open the valve to adjust the pressure. If you don't you will start cutting the boot off, when the pain is horrific. The valve wants to be "finger" tight only, do not use a tool like pliers to tighten it.

But don't feel bad still to this day, five decades later, what you stated is still common belief. As a professional Alaskan pilot, driving small bush planes, that the cockpit fits you like a glove, when you climb to clear a mountain range, the valve needs to be finger snug "ONLY". I can also till you, the CIA did not need any form of torture at GITMO other then putting those boots on a prisoner, and him in a decompression chamber.........there is nothing he will not tell you, the pain of having you foot crushed is horrific. (Ask me how I know this)
 
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Aklogcabin

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I use muck arctic pro. My beautiful wife could only find me arctic sport n bought them. They were considerably different. They don't have the insulation that made the pro version fit nice n snug but not tight. And will return them.
Being the smart shopper she is. She found a great deal from muck Co on the net. She calls the folks at the muck sales department. Orders the arctic pro. Near 180 bucks. Free shipping. She asks if they have any coupons. She ended up paying about 150 bucks delivered to the door within a week.
Well to the little satellite post office box anyhows. The tracking they have now says they are there now.
So for the muck boots folks, you may want to check them out.
As for wear. The last pair are 10 years old. And I spent a lot of time outside. My cut off is 15 below but that gets stretch a lot.
Used mostly for chores around the house. We have small livestock requiring every day. Cutting firewood, trapping, ice fishing, lots of walking around the place looking for whatever.
And lots of fixing machines.
Most important for me is when I'm freighting supplies with the snogo. Or just out cruising along the edges of the woods looking for animal tracks. I can end up way out. And when going out for a fun ride can take me a hundred miles from any road. And machines break. And get stuck. Get really stuck when the snow gets over 5 foot deep. Step off your snogo n go up to your neck in snow. BTW the lighter n tighter fitting buck pros are nice because they don't slip off. Try finding a white bunny boot under 5' of white snow. In your sock.
The extra height is really appreciated when you break threw the ice. Hopefully the waters not tooooo deep. That's where bunny boots will keep you alive. You can dump them out n dry with a paper towel, always have paper towels, dry socks n your good. Even just dumping them n wearing them you will usually be ok. If you're going out ice fishing or hunting. Sitting all day, or going out riding the snogos, bunny boots are nice. And the fact that they squeeze up nice n firm behind the stirup of a snogo they help holding you on the sled. Push your feet up in the stirrups n sit back. I need to ride one handed to reduce stress on my broken neck so this helps. Until something breaks n I have to walk a bunch of miles. And back, hopefully not back out.
Hey hope that helps. Just wish I had my mucks on cruising down a remote trail with a load of freight. Or just out enjoying the northern lights.
But hey I can saddle up the take our grandson n go out ice fishing just a few miles east. If it would warm up a bit been in the near minus 20 for a few weeks now.
Now the world knows all about my boots oh boy
 

joel

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Is this guy crazy or can a candle keep you warm?
 

Terri9630

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Is this guy crazy or can a candle keep you warm?
Just your breathing under a blanket like that can help warm you up. When we've been camping and I was cold I pull my jacket over my nose/mouth or the blanket over my head and it really helps. A candle would probably help but I've never done that.
 

joel

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We went camping we had a fire & tents with sleeping bags. The lowest temperature was 29F, so I have no ideal if this would work.
I would not travel in cold winter without a fire source & dry tinder, forget wondering around the wood in snow for a few days.
 

Spikedriver

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Just your breathing under a blanket like that can help warm you up. When we've been camping and I was cold I pull my jacket over my nose/mouth or the blanket over my head and it really helps. A candle would probably help but I've never done that.
It does help. You trap your exhaled air around your mouth and nose that way, and your body has already warmed it up. It doesn't suck the heat of of you as much when you breathe. I'm not sure exactly how much it helps, but I notice a difference.
 
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