What nuts are these?

Discussion in 'Growing Food Trees' started by Angie, Aug 20, 2018.

Help Support Homesteading Forum by donating using the link above.
  1. Aug 20, 2018 #1

    Angie

    Angie

    Angie

    Porch Lover Staff Member Admin Neighbor

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2017
    Messages:
    3,126
    Likes Received:
    8,206
    I just we t out back and discovered these nuts. The trees are very tall and I could not tell what tree had them.

    I've always thought i just had oaks and acorns were dropping.

    So. What could these be?
    20180820_151053.jpg
     
  2. Aug 20, 2018 #2

    Terri9630

    Terri9630

    Terri9630

    Internet Princess Staff Member Moderator Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    3,737
    Likes Received:
    17,182
    Location:
    Southern and central NM.
    Looks like pecans. Peel open the green one, if its a pecan then that's just an "unripe" outer husk.
     
  3. Aug 20, 2018 #3

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    18,744
    I think those are black walnuts. Look at the one to the far right. You can see she shape of the nutmeat inside.

    Do you know how to process black walnuts? Lay them on newspaper and let them dry out. If you try to peel them when they are green like that, your hands will be stained dark for days.
     
  4. Aug 20, 2018 #4

    tiffanysgallery

    tiffanysgallery

    tiffanysgallery

    Awesome Friend Neighbor

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2018
    Messages:
    860
    Likes Received:
    4,183
    Maybe look up black walnut tree online to see if it looks like your tree.

    Black walnut trees are large, squirrels love them, and they bury those walnuts everywhere! (from my experience)

    Pecan trees are nice to have also.
     
    snappy1 and timmie like this.
  5. Aug 20, 2018 #5

    timmie

    timmie

    timmie

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2017
    Messages:
    962
    Likes Received:
    5,305
    angie , i can't get a good look, but i also think it's black walnut. for some reason it won't let me pull up the picture all the way.
     
  6. Aug 20, 2018 #6

    SheepDog

    SheepDog

    SheepDog

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    1,554
    Likes Received:
    7,472
    Location:
    SE Washington State
    Walnut - either English or black but definitely a walnut.
     
  7. Aug 20, 2018 #7

    Bacpacker

    Bacpacker

    Bacpacker

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 4, 2017
    Messages:
    1,325
    Likes Received:
    5,266
    Location:
    East Tn
    Walnut for sure. I have several old trees on my property.
     
    Weedygarden likes this.
  8. Aug 20, 2018 #8

    Angie

    Angie

    Angie

    Porch Lover Staff Member Admin Neighbor

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2017
    Messages:
    3,126
    Likes Received:
    8,206
    Thanks all. The Black Walnut trees my Uncle had seemed to have the wrapped nut being about twice the size and he had them every year. This is the first time I've seen these on the ground, and I've lived here 20 years. But that's an area that was sometimes allowed to grow up a bit more than lawn length.
    As to seeing which tree, that's going to take some doing as these trees lowest limbs are about 2 stories up.
     
  9. Aug 20, 2018 #9

    Woody

    Woody

    Woody

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2017
    Messages:
    2,012
    Likes Received:
    8,440
    Think Euell Gibbons... "Tastes like wild hickory nuts".

    They are delicious, makes a fine bread but they are the devil to de-meat.

    Pick them up before the squirrels get them and let them dry until the hulls peel into 4 sections. Then you can crack them open. Two Oak 2x's with a door hinge connecting them makes a great hut cracker. Try rotating them different ways until you can crack them in several places before they fall apart. The meat is in tiny little crevasse and comes out much easier if most of the shell is cracked.
     
    timmie, snappy1, Angie and 1 other person like this.
  10. Aug 20, 2018 #10

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    18,744
    Black walnuts are delicious, but as has already been said, they are difficult to shell and to get all the nut meat out. I think I only remember eating them once. My aunt and uncle, have a big tree in their yard. They had 9 children so made the most of all food sources. They used to spread them on newspaper on their basement floor. My aunt made a refrigerator cookie with them.
     
  11. Aug 20, 2018 #11

    Angie

    Angie

    Angie

    Porch Lover Staff Member Admin Neighbor

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2017
    Messages:
    3,126
    Likes Received:
    8,206
    The tree up close framing the home is a Black Walnut that I knew. It had golf ball size walnut when they fell to the ground.
    My uncle protected those trees. Even kept the utility company from cutting through them to put lines, the lines went across the street with no trees.

    [​IMG]
     
  12. Aug 20, 2018 #12

    Woody

    Woody

    Woody

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2017
    Messages:
    2,012
    Likes Received:
    8,440
    To clarify the cracking: Bring the 2x's together gently to just crack the nut then rotate and crack again and again until it falls apart. You DO NOT want to smash the nut! It will be 4, 5 or 6 times cracking each one. You will need a pick and drive yourself nuts (pun intended) if you try to get every little tiny piece of meat out. It takes a while but you will find a system for cracking them so the meat comes out easier.

    If you are really handy, use a hammer to crack them. Bounce it on them a few times while rotating until you hear the first crack, then rotate while bouncing the hammer on it. Same results as the 2x's but more prone to smashing them if you bounce too hard. Smashing them is worthless as the meat is mixed with shell and there is little meat in each one anyway.
     
    joel, Weedygarden and Angie like this.
  13. Aug 20, 2018 #13

    Woody

    Woody

    Woody

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2017
    Messages:
    2,012
    Likes Received:
    8,440
    [​IMG]
     
    timmie, Peanut, snappy1 and 2 others like this.
  14. Aug 20, 2018 #14

    Angie

    Angie

    Angie

    Porch Lover Staff Member Admin Neighbor

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2017
    Messages:
    3,126
    Likes Received:
    8,206
    Sure seems like the same thing. Thanks for that image for comparison.
     
    Woody and Weedygarden like this.
  15. Aug 20, 2018 #15

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    18,744
    What is interesting is that the inside shell on this one is smooth, not rough like a black walnut is.

    black_walnut.png
     
    Woody likes this.
  16. Aug 20, 2018 #16

    joel

    joel

    joel

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 8, 2017
    Messages:
    757
    Likes Received:
    3,027
    Woody and Weedygarden like this.
  17. Aug 20, 2018 #17

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Peanut

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2017
    Messages:
    2,017
    Likes Received:
    10,984
    One of the hickory's, if I remember right there are 7 species in the southeast, hard to say which one by the nut.
     
  18. Aug 21, 2018 #18

    Woody

    Woody

    Woody

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2017
    Messages:
    2,012
    Likes Received:
    8,440
    I do not know if the different ones taste different. I had Shagbark Hickory trees.
     
    timmie, joel and Weedygarden like this.
  19. Aug 21, 2018 #19

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

    Patriot Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2017
    Messages:
    3,280
    Likes Received:
    12,206
    Ugh, I absolutely hate the taste and smell of black walnuts...
    BUT, they are very useful for medicinal purposes in a few different issues. The hulls, leaves and bark can be used, after drying and grinding up, for skin preparations, poultices, added to ointments, along with a few other herbs to enhance the action. It is also useful made into a tincture with other herbs as a flu preventative. I get my learnin' from the late Dr. John Christopher and his son who now operates The School of Natural Healing. I get no kickback rewards for mentioning them. The website, herballegacy has lots of useful information on herbs and ailments.
     
    timmie, Woody and Weedygarden like this.
  20. Aug 22, 2018 #20

    PopPopT

    PopPopT

    PopPopT

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2018
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    713
    I wondered if the picture was of a hickory nut. I have a couple of hickory trees close to the house here and there are a good many nuts there. I'm intending to collect a few. Have been around black walnuts since I was a kid but not hickory nuts. That's gonna be a new experience. :)
     
    Woody and Weedygarden like this.
  21. Mar 2, 2019 #21

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    18,744
    Patchouli, searching through older threads, I just saw this. Will you please tell us more about his school and your experiences?
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2019
    Patchouli likes this.
  22. Mar 2, 2019 #22

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

    Patriot Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2017
    Messages:
    3,280
    Likes Received:
    12,206
    Hey, @Weedygarden
    Yes, I'd be happy to tell you more. For starts, I have a large family, so they were my guinea pigs at times.
    I got sick of regular medicine, being bossed around by doctors, doubted, etc.
    Through reading on the herbal legacy website and a couple of unaffiliated books that I was using for resource/reference, I finally applied to the school for the whole "certificate," Master Herbalist. It costs a lot. I still haven't finished all of my course material but it would cost me to get back into it and start submitting my course materials for grading. I was doing it by mail. Things have changed a lot since then, for me, for the School of Natural Healing, and for the course content.

    You used to be able to call them certain days and speak directly to David Christopher. Twice, maybe three times, I spoke with him about a couple of different health issues and his calm and friendly demeanor gave me the confidence to keep forging ahead. Sometimes you just need that extra push, the extra voice of approval, to keep you going, ya know? Or maybe you know you're right about something and need to hear an agreeing opinion. (It wasn't even about course content). I think they charge for phone calls now. Time is money.
    David Christopher used to do a radio broadcast, probably still does, about herbal medicine, heard out in Utah. Some of the material that is used in the course content are recordings of him or his father, the founder, Dr. John Christopher, during lectures they would give at the School.
    I used to also call the School once in a while and talk to the nice folks that were there to help out with any questions about the courses. Again, helpful and nice.
    The content, to me, seemed to be information that I felt like I already knew. I had not been studying herbs intensely but it all just melted into my brain. It made sense. After working with the herbs on my own small issues and some illnesses with my family, i wasn't turning back.
    Don't get me wrong. Yes, we still go to a doctor or hospital if necessary. But when i was growing up I had allergies and sinus problems and felt like I was at the doctor a lot. After dealing with it in my own family, I had had enough! A little diet change, lifestyle change, quit thinking every illness is doctor-worthy, and we became an even weirder family.
    :woo hoo:
    Now most of my kids are grown up and gone with spouses in the medical field, and they scoff at mom's ideas on herbs. lol
    ("Your mom is crazy.")
    I didn't stay on the herb path like I had hoped but I still turn to herbs first for myself. After what I've been through lately, I am ready to start back on it.
    There is another forum user here who also used Dr. Christopher's teachings but I am not at liberty to share the user's name.
    I have stories but I don't want to share unless there is a need or interest.
    Thank you for asking, @Weedygarden . My heart used to be on fire to share about herbs but I eventually stopped.
     
  23. Mar 2, 2019 #23

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    18,744
    I have an idea who that is.

    Thank you for your response. I looked at the cost of the course, and yes, it is expensive. If I were 40 years younger, I would do the whole course.
     
    Amish Heart and Patchouli like this.
  24. Mar 2, 2019 #24

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

    Patriot Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2017
    Messages:
    3,280
    Likes Received:
    12,206
    Weedy, there are quite a few other "schools" out there with courses that are much cheaper, but i do not know their reputations. Seemed to me there was something in Oregon or Washington, something well known in New Mexico with a high reputation, and at least one in the east that seemed decent.
    Search for stuff on Amazon. I imagine people buy the course materials and then end up selling it. I'm certain I've seen Dr. Christopher materials on Amazon.
     
    Bacpacker and Weedygarden like this.
  25. Mar 2, 2019 #25

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Weedygarden

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2017
    Messages:
    4,202
    Likes Received:
    18,744
    I think an online training is probably the better way to go.

    I thought about looking for herbal books on Amazon.
     
    Patchouli likes this.
  26. Mar 2, 2019 #26

    snappy1

    snappy1

    snappy1

    Awesome Friend Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2017
    Messages:
    1,147
    Likes Received:
    6,244
    Location:
    Southwest Mississippi

    I have black walnut tincture for dental purposes. It stopped the pain and killed the root/ nerve of a tooth I had cracked. The dentist that pulled it said it was crazy that I didn't have any pain. This was about 5 years ago it happened and I now keep the tincture and powder.
     
    Amish Heart, Bacpacker and Patchouli like this.
  27. Mar 2, 2019 #27

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

    Patchouli

    Patriot Neighbor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2017
    Messages:
    3,280
    Likes Received:
    12,206
    Yes, @Weedygarden , most of these places do offer online or email classes.
     
    Weedygarden likes this.

Share This Page