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Working Cattle

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Peanut

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My grtnephews came up today. They had 15 or so bred heifers they wanted to move to another farm. They had leased 40 acres of pasture w/creek for a year for the price of fixing the fences. He said he’d spent about $200 on barbwire and posts, not a bad deal, plus he got hunting rights.

He has some nice calves born in the past couple of weeks. His bull in angus, good blood but not registered. I don’t trust him though, he seems gentle but the kind that’d turn on you in a blink.

He blew a tire on the trailer when pulling out... I'm glad I don't have these headaches anymore.

09may20 cattle a ( 1) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a ( 2) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a ( 3) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a ( 4) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a ( 5) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a ( 6) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a ( 7) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a ( 8) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a ( 9) sm.JPG09may20 cattle a (10) sm.JPG
 

Weedygarden

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I have memories of working cattle, although I didn't do the whole 9 yards of rounding them up, corralling them, running them through the chute, and then all the potential activities that happen when working cattle. In my family, working cattle was mostly men's work. One day I was wearing a red jack and uncle jumped to doing something with a bull that he wanted rounded up. In the midst of it, he told me I shouldn't have been there with my red jacket. Okay!
 

Bacpacker

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Good looking cattle. I know Angus are a prime breed, but the few we had were all crazy, very unpredictable. Most of our cattle were herfords, or short horned Durhams. They were both typically pretty docile and not real hard to work with. I do miss having cattle around.
 

Peanut

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I don't trust Angus, never have, they can be unpredictable. I was sort of spoiled all those years we ran charolais, gentle giants. The last bull dad and I bought was a polled hereford, gentle as he could be and a great bull. see pics...

Any thing in the above photos thats white or red are descended from those blood lines. My grtnephew is partial to angus for some reason but they are his problem now.

big red (1).jpgbig red (3).jpg
 

Bacpacker

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I recognized the herford bloodlines in you realy pics. That last bull you showed looks a lot like one my uncle had. Awesome bull, great fast growing offspring, almost never lost a cow from birthing issues. And we never had problems with them getting out even in areas where the fences needed work.
 

Meerkat

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I have memories of working cattle, although I didn't do the whole 9 yards of rounding them up, corralling them, running them through the chute, and then all the potential activities that happen when working cattle. In my family, working cattle was mostly men's work. One day I was wearing a red jack and uncle jumped to doing something with a bull that he wanted rounded up. In the midst of it, he told me I shouldn't have been there with my red jacket. Okay!
I had one chase me across a pasture and I was'nt even wearing red. I was halfway between the barn and the fence I had went under,I bet 1/4 mile easy. That bull waited for me to get too far to make a run for it.
He came full speed. I could actually feel his heavy snorting on my legs as I dove over the barbed wire fence how he stopped don't know didn't care was too busy trying to catch my breath. I am very afraid of bulls since.
Just week before I had out manuvered a large pony on my elbows who reared up and knocked me down flat on my back I was twisting and turning to get back ti the fnce then too. I was around equine and some cattle but they didn't act like these did. I declined the next fun trip toi that farm. :ghostly:I didn't lie the people or their animals.
 

Dani

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The first Angus bull my hunny bought got out of the fence. I eyed him out in the corner of the front yard out where my goat pasture and garden are. I started to go out with a broom and halfway out he started to charge me. My butt ran back to the house. . . . Tbone had to go!
 

Peanut

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I posted this bull the other day in one of our general chat threads. I thought I should put it here. We ran Charolais bulls for years. Wonderful bulls but they tend to father very large calves. This became a problem for us, lost several good cows to birthing problems. That’s when we switched to the polled Hereford.

I do like Charolais though, gentle creatures. This guy weighed about 2300lbs, pic1. I could walk out in the pasture at night and call him. He’d walk up and put his giant head against my chest, he loved having his ears scratched.

For big operations that have the facilities more dangerous breeds aren’t a problem. For small family farms I always recommend a gentle breed, charolais and herefords come to mind. Even with gentle breeds there is the occasional crazy cow or bull that can be dangerous.

Dad and I kept the crazies out of our herd with one exception. She was the best cow/mom we ever had. She always raised a great calf. There is still one of her offspring in the herd who I never turn my back on. She is as dangerous as her mom, she raises a great calf like her mom, even delivered and raised great twins one year, pic2. Notice in the photo she is staring at me. 20 seconds after I took the photo she lunged at me and tore down an electric fence. For no reason... I was walking away from her when she did it.

big boy mid (1) (1) sm.jpgf 01 (13) sm.jpg
 
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Weedygarden

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I thought I saw Herefords in your original photos. But is the white one a charolais? I know many people who raise cattle pick a breed and raise them exclusively. I was a little confused by the mix of breeds in the photo. I have known people who have mixed herds. One person called his herd "scrub cattle." I am not sure what that means.

In the area I grew up, there were a few people who raised Angus exclusively and they seemed to be wealthier people. It was always marketed as a superior beef. I still see beef marked "Angus" in the grocery store. Others raised Polled Herefords, other Charolais.

We used to get farm news on the radio. (We had limited media, radio and television) There were always reports for what crops and other things were going for. One term I remember hearing frequently was "canners and cutters." Evidently there are eight grades of beef. Beef Quality Grades (Eight)

Beef Quality Grades (Eight)

There are eight beef quality grades.
The grades are based on two main criteria: the degree of marbling (intramuscular fat) in the beef, and the maturity (estimated age of the animal at slaughter).

1. U.S. Prime – Highest in quality and intramuscular fat, limited supply. Currently, about 2.9% of carcasses grade as Prime.[15]

2. U.S. Choice – High quality, widely available in foodservice industry and retail markets. Choice carcasses are 53.7% of the fed cattle total. The difference between Choice and Prime is largely due to the fat content in the beef. Prime typically has a higher fat content (more and well distributed intramuscular "marbling") than Choice.

3. U.S. Select (formerly Good) – lowest grade commonly sold at retail, acceptable quality, but is less juicy and tender due to leanness.

4. U.S. Standard – Lower quality, yet economical, lacking marbling.

5. U.S. Commercial – Low quality, lacking tenderness, produced from older animals.

6. U.S. Utility

7. U.S. Cutter

8. U.S. Canner


I don't trust Angus, never have, they can be unpredictable. I was sort of spoiled all those years we ran charolais, gentle giants. The last bull dad and I bought was a polled hereford, gentle as he could be and a great bull. see pics...

Any thing in the above photos thats white or red are descended from those blood lines. My grtnephew is partial to angus for some reason but they are his problem now.
 

Meerkat

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The first Angus bull my hunny bought got out of the fence. I eyed him out in the corner of the front yard out where my goat pasture and garden are. I started to go out with a broom and halfway out he started to charge me. My butt ran back to the house. . . . Tbone had to go!
Its like a train coming at you. Did it make you afraid of bulls too Dani?
 

Meerkat

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I posted this bull the other day in one of our general chat threads. I thought I should put it here. We ran Charolais bulls for years. Wonderful bulls but they tend to father very large calves. This became a problem for us, lost several good cows to birthing problems. That’s when we switched to the polled Hereford.

I do like Charolais though, gentle creatures. This guy weighed about 2300lbs, pic1. I could walk out in the pasture at night and call him. He’d walk up and put his giant head against my chest, he loved having his ears scratched.

For big operations that have the facilities more dangerous breeds aren’t a problem. For small family farms I always recommend a gentle breed, charolais and herefords come to mind. Even with gentle breeds there is the occasional crazy cow or bull that can be dangerous.

Dad and I kept the crazies out of our herd with one exception. She was the best cow/mom we ever had. She always raised a great calf. There is still one of her offspring in the herd who I never turn my back on. She is as dangerous as her mom, she raises a great calf like her mom, even delivered and raised great twins one year, pic2. Notice in the photo she is staring at me. 20 seconds after I took the photo she lunged at me and tore down an electric fence. For no reason... I was walking away from her when she did it.

View attachment 41801View attachment 41802
Looking at that tranquell looking animal who would think they could be used at race tracks instead of horses,less maintinance :p too.
 

Meerkat

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I thought I saw Herefords in your original photos. But is the white one a charolais? I know many people who raise cattle pick a breed and raise them exclusively. I was a little confused by the mix of breeds in the photo. I have known people who have mixed herds. One person called his herd "scrub cattle." I am not sure what that means.

In the area I grew up, there were a few people who raised Angus exclusively and they seemed to be wealthier people. It was always marketed as a superior beef. I still see beef marked "Angus" in the grocery store. Others raised Polled Herefords, other Charolais.

We used to get farm news on the radio. (We had limited media, radio and television) There were always reports for what crops and other things were going for. One term I remember hearing frequently was "canners and cutters." Evidently there are eight grades of beef. Beef Quality Grades (Eight)

Beef Quality Grades (Eight)

There are eight beef quality grades.
The grades are based on two main criteria: the degree of marbling (intramuscular fat) in the beef, and the maturity (estimated age of the animal at slaughter).

1. U.S. Prime – Highest in quality and intramuscular fat, limited supply. Currently, about 2.9% of carcasses grade as Prime.[15]

2. U.S. Choice – High quality, widely available in foodservice industry and retail markets. Choice carcasses are 53.7% of the fed cattle total. The difference between Choice and Prime is largely due to the fat content in the beef. Prime typically has a higher fat content (more and well distributed intramuscular "marbling") than Choice.

3. U.S. Select (formerly Good) – lowest grade commonly sold at retail, acceptable quality, but is less juicy and tender due to leanness.

4. U.S. Standard – Lower quality, yet economical, lacking marbling.

5. U.S. Commercial – Low quality, lacking tenderness, produced from older animals.

6. U.S. Utility

7. U.S. Cutter

8. U.S. Canner

No wonder they hate us.:peace:
 

Peanut

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In the midst of it, he told me I shouldn't have been there with my red jacket. Okay!
I had one chase me across a pasture and I was'nt even wearing red.
Hate to burst anyone's belief but cattle are pretty much color blind. They can't see red! Movement is what triggers a bull to charge, not color. I've known this for years but hadn't RED up on it in a while! pardon the pun! :rolleyes:

 

Dani

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Its like a train coming at you. Did it make you afraid of bulls too Dani?
let's just say I was very leary of TBone. . . We had just brought him home a week or two before from an auction house so I really didnt know his temperament well. My hunny took care of him. We went and bought my milk cow shortly after. As soon as we stopped by the pasturd, TBone ran thru our electric fence to get to her. Didnt realize she was in heat. He started attacking that trailor so hunny is trying to corral the bull back in the fence. THose was acting all kinds of wild and since I had not been around cows too much at that time, I was a little nerve wreaked. I ended up just driving the truck and trailor into the pasture and TBone followed. . . . That experience was still very recent so when he started to run at me that day, I can back for the house and told hunny he needed to come take care of his darn bull!

Now years later, I'm not scared of them, but I do watch out when out with them. The bull we have now is one that we bottle fed so I have been around him since he was a week old and probably about 2400 lbs now. He has been chased many a times with a broom and if he runs back towards me, I hold it up to turn his direction. He hates sticks.
 

Meerkat

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let's just say I was very leary of TBone. . . We had just brought him home a week or two before from an auction house so I really didnt know his temperament well. My hunny took care of him. We went and bought my milk cow shortly after. As soon as we stopped by the pasturd, TBone ran thru our electric fence to get to her. Didnt realize she was in heat. He started attacking that trailor so hunny is trying to corral the bull back in the fence. THose was acting all kinds of wild and since I had not been around cows too much at that time, I was a little nerve wreaked. I ended up just driving the truck and trailor into the pasture and TBone followed. . . . That experience was still very recent so when he started to run at me that day, I can back for the house and told hunny he needed to come take care of his darn bull!

Now years later, I'm not scared of them, but I do watch out when out with them. The bull we have now is one that we bottle fed so I have been around him since he was a week old and probably about 2400 lbs now. He has been chased many a times with a broom and if he runs back towards me, I hold it up to turn his direction. He hates sticks.
LOL and good thinking on leading TBone back into the pasture. :thumbs: :cool:
 

Spikedriver

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We had red Angus when I was little, but Pops was in the process of switching over to Simmentals at that time. Simmentals are more laid back. We did have one that was nuts. She blew up while the vet was shoulder deep in a preg check once. Tore the headgate down and went right through the south Wall of the barn. The vet just shook his head and said, she's pregnant, and she's going to be pregnant every time I see her. She knocked a gate off its hinges the next spring. The next time we sold cattle, she went on that truck...

We had a Simmental bull I named "Sing Sing". He was colored just like a panda bear. He was so tame that you had to watch him or he'd smash you against the fence trying to get his back scratched...
 

Weedygarden

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let's just say I was very leary of TBone. . . We had just brought him home a week or two before from an auction house so I really didnt know his temperament well. My hunny took care of him. We went and bought my milk cow shortly after. As soon as we stopped by the pasturd, TBone ran thru our electric fence to get to her. Didnt realize she was in heat. He started attacking that trailor so hunny is trying to corral the bull back in the fence. THose was acting all kinds of wild and since I had not been around cows too much at that time, I was a little nerve wreaked. I ended up just driving the truck and trailor into the pasture and TBone followed. . . . That experience was still very recent so when he started to run at me that day, I can back for the house and told hunny he needed to come take care of his darn bull!

Now years later, I'm not scared of them, but I do watch out when out with them. The bull we have now is one that we bottle fed so I have been around him since he was a week old and probably about 2400 lbs now. He has been chased many a times with a broom and if he runs back towards me, I hold it up to turn his direction. He hates sticks.
Wow, Dani! I know that farmers and ranchers have many cows per bull. That poor cow, she needed some other cows to take the attention off of her.
 

Weedygarden

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Hate to burst anyone's belief but cattle are pretty much color blind. They can't see red! Movement is what triggers a bull to charge, not color. I've known this for years but hadn't RED up on it in a while! pardon the pun! :rolleyes:

Old wive's tale I suppose. This particular uncle was always finding fault with anyone and everyone. He used the red jacket that day. His bad attitude ran many people off, including me. Decades later, I heard stories about how he mistreated people that I had never heard before. It worked out for me, because it helped me realize I couldn't be around him for any length of time. I would stop and see him for a few minutes on my way through town, but that was it.
 

Dani

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Wow, Dani! I know that farmers and ranchers have many cows per bull. That poor cow, she needed some other cows to take the attention off of her.
Yeah Daisy May was our first cow and she was a great milker. Anywhere between 5-6 gallons. Oh how I miss her but she got to be an old girl and we ended up losing her Christmas Eve last year.
 

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