Dandelion wine making

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I’m thinking of starting to make dandelion wine. I noticed that most of the recipes call for lemon or orange zest as well as raisins. That’s of course no issue in a normal time, but I was thinking of how I would do that in a grid down scenario as growing these fruits is currently not an option. Is the citrus required? What about the raisins? Anyone have experience with this?

I think that this would be an excellent barter item, and it would be a good pickmeup in the winter months after it’s aged all Sumer in a grid down scenario. Any insights are welcome.

Thank you.
 
We made some dandelion wine, added raisen and even dried dates to get enough yeast into the mixture to get it to start making alcohol. You can add some citrus but do not need to, it changes the flavor if you like it that way tho.
We ended up having a bit too much sugar in it and got a heavy oily liqueur with great flavor but thicker than wine.
You need lots of dandelion flowers, need to cut the yellow flower from the green base with a sharp knife tho or it makes the wine bitter.
Bring the flowers, clean water, sugar, raisens, dates and citrus to a slightly heated (not boiled) temp and then let cool. Let it sit in a container for several months to let the yeast turn the sugar into alcohol, filter and transfer to bottles and let sit another half year minimum to age a bit.
 
We made some dandelion wine, added raisen and even dried dates to get enough yeast into the mixture to get it to start making alcohol. You can add some citrus but do not need to, it changes the flavor if you like it that way tho.
We ended up having a bit too much sugar in it and got a heavy oily liqueur with great flavor but thicker than wine.
You need lots of dandelion flowers, need to cut the yellow flower from the green base with a sharp knife tho or it makes the wine bitter.
Bring the flowers, clean water, sugar, raisens, dates and citrus to a slightly heated (not boiled) temp and then let cool. Let it sit in a container for several months to let the yeast turn the sugar into alcohol, filter and transfer to bottles and let sit another half year minimum to age a bit.
If I used a packet of wine yeast would I need anything other than the sugar, water, and dandelions?
 
We made some dandelion wine, added raisen and even dried dates to get enough yeast into the mixture to get it to start making alcohol. You can add some citrus but do not need to, it changes the flavor if you like it that way tho.
We ended up having a bit too much sugar in it and got a heavy oily liqueur with great flavor but thicker than wine.
You need lots of dandelion flowers, need to cut the yellow flower from the green base with a sharp knife tho or it makes the wine bitter.
Bring the flowers, clean water, sugar, raisens, dates and citrus to a slightly heated (not boiled) temp and then let cool. Let it sit in a container for several months to let the yeast turn the sugar into alcohol, filter and transfer to bottles and let sit another half year minimum to age a bit.
thank you for your reply.
 
If you use the yeast, you will be ok. The problem with dandelions for wine, is there is not enough natural yeast to get any or enough alcohol production. The Raisens, dates or yeast provide the needed natural reaction for the sugars to turn into alcohol. You can add anything and everything you want.
I asked my neighbor how much practice is needed to get a good wine right...his answer was simple:
"after about twenty trys, you will have made all the mistakes and learned all the needed lessons".....
(meaning after about 20 years....)
 
Fair enough.

Do I need any kind of contraption on the lid when the fermentation is taking place? I’ve heard different things.
 
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