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viking

I know a lot of things, but master very few
Neighbor
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755
Location
S.W. Oregon
Our dear friends, like more family than our family, just brought us 23 barred rock chicks, they told us that they have been looking for chicks for us for some time. They said they only paid 25 cents each, they asked the salesman a number of times if that was the correct price but we all figure it should have been $2.25 each. Yesterday I set up the 2'X2'X8' metal water tank in the chicken coop with a heat lamp, dried wood chips in the bottom, a feeder and a waterer. This has all happened when we were down to our last old hen (still laying) and one nasty old rooster, both have been adopted while the chicks are growing up. We are so blessed to have such great neighbors that are dear friends.
 

viking

I know a lot of things, but master very few
Neighbor
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Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
755
Location
S.W. Oregon
A few days ago I dumped the chicks on the chicken coop floor, they all have their feathers now and since our friends gave them to us we've only lost three and that's not unexpected, they just weren't developed that well from the beginning, so having 20 lively healthy chicks is a good thing. Our friends took a box of our older hen eggs and put them under a broody, she hatched two and we will soon add them to our flock.
 

SheepDog

Awesome Friend
Neighbor
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Dec 3, 2017
Messages
5,408
Location
SE Washington State
With all the eggs you are going to have how are you going to store them?
I recommend Sodium Silicate solution as it will keep unwashed eggs good for over a year without refrigeration.
 

viking

I know a lot of things, but master very few
Neighbor
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Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
755
Location
S.W. Oregon
I have friends that want most of the eggs our hens lay, they appreciate that our hens freely roam around and get bugs and seeds from weeds and grass, the yokes are really orange and stand up tall in a pan, they really like the flavor they have, anyway we seldom have to store eggs for very long. I believe Sodium Silicate is also called Waterglass.
 

Supervisor42

Formerly known as Supervisor42
Neighbor
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Dec 16, 2017
Messages
4,863
Location
Louisiana
I have friends that want most of the eggs our hens lay, they appreciate that our hens freely roam around and get bugs and seeds from weeds and grass, the yokes are really orange and stand up tall in a pan, they really like the flavor they have, anyway we seldom have to store eggs for very long. I believe Sodium Silicate is also called Waterglass.
I thought I remembered that stuff being used to lock-up engines on vehicles that were traded in on the "Cash for Clunkers" program.
All those brain-cells ain't dead yet:
Wikipedia said:
To ensure that vehicles traded-in under "cash for clunkers" will not be resold by dealers, the program outlines a procedure for destructively disabling the engine (and thus also precluding the possibility that any mechanical engine components might be salvaged to be used in the repair of any other vehicles): the motor oil is drained and replaced with a sodium silicate solution, then the engine is started and run until the solution, becoming glass-like when heated, causes engine internals to abrade and ultimately seize
A very sad time because they could have been sent to third-world countries that have NO vehicles.
And now have no hope of ever having one because we DESTROYED THEM ALL!
Sorry, got off topic againidiot.gif.
 
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SheepDog

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Neighbor
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Dec 3, 2017
Messages
5,408
Location
SE Washington State
It has also been used to seal blown head gaskets and radiator leaks. It is used as high temperature glue for fireplace gaskets.
It is non-toxic although it is considered an irritant of the skin and mucus membranes. Gloves are recommended when contact is likely.
It is used in liquid form to store unwashed eggs because it prevents air and bacterial/viral infections through the permeable shell.
 

viking

I know a lot of things, but master very few
Neighbor
HCL Supporter
Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
755
Location
S.W. Oregon
Since all the chicks have grown pretty good and have all of their feathers, I've been opening the small door to the fenced chicken yard, so far there has only been six that have gone out but that's a good start, I try to stand by, when I can, to protect them from hawks or other creatures. I've not had too good of luck on that issue for the past few years, probably due to the shortage of food for the predators in the surrounding area. What I need to do is install overhead chicken wire and that's not the easiest thing to do, but I do have a couple of rolls on hand to take care of that.
 

Terri9630

Internet Princess
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Dec 3, 2017
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7,619
Location
Central NM.
Since all the chicks have grown pretty good and have all of their feathers, I've been opening the small door to the fenced chicken yard, so far there has only been six that have gone out but that's a good start, I try to stand by, when I can, to protect them from hawks or other creatures. I've not had too good of luck on that issue for the past few years, probably due to the shortage of food for the predators in the surrounding area. What I need to do is install overhead chicken wire and that's not the easiest thing to do, but I do have a couple of rolls on hand to take care of that.
Shade cloth works too. Bonus is there are no sharp edges.
 

Spikedriver

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Nov 27, 2017
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3,086
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Midwest
Since all the chicks have grown pretty good and have all of their feathers, I've been opening the small door to the fenced chicken yard, so far there has only been six that have gone out but that's a good start, I try to stand by, when I can, to protect them from hawks or other creatures. I've not had too good of luck on that issue for the past few years, probably due to the shortage of food for the predators in the surrounding area. What I need to do is install overhead chicken wire and that's not the easiest thing to do, but I do have a couple of rolls on hand to take care of that.
Get that overhead barrier up. Most of my friends with layers have lost a bunch to raccoons this year. Darn coons will go right over any wall or fence. Also set out live traps, to get the weasels and mink...
 

viking

I know a lot of things, but master very few
Neighbor
HCL Supporter
Joined
Jan 8, 2018
Messages
755
Location
S.W. Oregon
Many years ago when we had our first batch of chickens, I'm pretty sure it was mink that took out our last three hens, their throats were eaten out and I've heard that that was a trait of minks. And yes, those pesky coons are capable of climbing up corner walls and that's how one got into our coop and killed about six hens and an easy going rooster, I ended up installing 1/8" wire cloth over the vent windows and closing in the rafter ends. Near sundown I always close up the coop and we've been thinking of padlocking the door, to keep two legged predators out as well.
 
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