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Survivor_316

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Do any of you use battery energizers for electric fencing? If so, any tips for choosing a good one?

I'm putting up a new area with netting in the woods too far for a plug and too shady for a solar. I'm thinking about buying a new battery energizer, but I am not good at this stuff.

It would probably only really need to be .25 joules, but I always prefer to overdo things since I would inevitably use it somewhere else or add on/change plans mid-project.

...not that I am known foe that kind of thing or anything.
 
Get one with the highest joules rating you can get. I've used the battery powered ones before and they do a good job. They last quite awhile on a fully charged battery too. You'll just need to bring the battery in and recharge occasionally.
You may need multiple ground rods for best effect. Some areas around here the ground is so dry we'd have take a barrel of water and soak the ground rod for it to work properly.
 
Get one with the highest joules rating you can get. I've used the battery powered ones before and they do a good job. They last quite awhile on a fully charged battery too. You'll just need to bring the battery in and recharge occasionally.
You may need multiple ground rods for best effect. Some areas around here the ground is so dry we'd have take a barrel of water and soak the ground rod for it to work properly.
Thank you! Is there any benefit to getting a combo one that can run on AC or DC?

And do the batteries charge fully over night if we just brought it in then?
 
Thank you! Is there any benefit to getting a combo one that can run on AC or DC?

And do the batteries charge fully over night if we just brought it in then?
An AC DC unit would be more versatile. The battery should charge overnight. But you might consider using two batteries. Keep one on a slow charge and swap them out. Usually when your critters get used to the electric fence they'll stay away from it, even when its off. A friend of mine kept 20 bulls behind an electric fence and they wouldn't go near it.
 
An AC DC unit would be more versatile. The battery should charge overnight. But you might consider using two batteries. Keep one on a slow charge and swap them out. Usually when your critters get used to the electric fence they'll stay away from it, even when its off. A friend of mine kept 20 bulls behind an electric fence and they wouldn't go near it.

Ok, I will get two then. Thanks!

I use the solar powered ones. They seem to hold an overnight charge.
Would a solar one work if it was deep in the woods? I had originally planned a solar one, but when I started thinking about it, I wasn't sure it would work.
 
Ok, I will get two then. Thanks!


Would a solar one work if it was deep in the woods? I had originally planned a solar one, but when I started thinking about it, I wasn't sure it would work.
Deep in the woods is kind of relative. In my back 10a of woods, it would work with proper placement. In a redwood forest, no.
 
Ha. Sometimes I forget where you guys live. I suppose it's not that deep into the woods to your standards! It's your standard Midwestern forest- oak, maple, sycamore, beech, etc. But it is dense for here.

I'm only setting up a small moveable area to get cleared of brush with intensive grazing. Just 1 strand of 160' netting. I might even double back on it to keep it tight so they eat it down faster before I move them.
 
Now I understand the different answers . It is because of the fence lengths . My fence is a single strand electric wire and is about 250 feet long .
Oh, yeah, I'm using a 48" tall netting. I have goats, so a single strand doesn't work for them, unfortunately.

If I ever get my jersey cattle, I'll have to rethink everything!
 
Because you want it movable and woods, AD’s way is better.
Solar is the way to go with set fencing run. It’s battery will last a couple of days.
Pooling all the ideas will lead you to the best solution.
 
Oh, yeah, I'm using a 48" tall netting. I have goats, so a single strand doesn't work for them, unfortunately.

If I ever get my jersey cattle, I'll have to rethink everything!
I guess I wasn't thinking about goats. Netting would be the way to go then. We've thought about getting some goats but fencing would be a problem. If I just turned the goats loose, would they come back at night?
 
I guess I wasn't thinking about goats. Netting would be the way to go then. We've thought about getting some goats but fencing would be a problem. If I just turned the goats loose, would they come back at night?
I have a friend that trained them with a feed bucket to get them in at night.
 
I guess I wasn't thinking about goats. Netting would be the way to go then. We've thought about getting some goats but fencing would be a problem. If I just turned the goats loose, would they come back at night?
It depends on the goats, but ours actually have to be fenced to keep them from banging on our door to get in the house! Ours have all been bottle fed either by us or others, so they're like needy little puppies. I can't count the number of times I thought I latched the door behind me only to come our and find a goat in our living room.
 
I guess I wasn't thinking about goats. Netting would be the way to go then. We've thought about getting some goats but fencing would be a problem. If I just turned the goats loose, would they come back at night?
They would if they know they will get extra "special" feeding. They are gluttons. All I have to do is call them and they come a running. It doesn't even matter if it's feeding time of the day. On occasion, I take out a "treat". It may be limbs trimmed, garden scraps, cookies ect. Once you get them trained, they come if in ear shot.
 
They would if they know they will get extra "special" feeding. They are gluttons. All I have to do is call them and they come a running. It doesn't even matter if it's feeding time of the day. On occasion, I take out a "treat". It may be limbs trimmed, garden scraps, cookies ect. Once you get them trained, they come if in ear shot.
The wife is the one that makes pets out of every critter. I look at something and see either food or $$ signs. I really don't know if I could justify buying a mile or so of goat proof fencing. Maybe we could put a few goats in the new chicken run to see if we like them.
 
The wife is the one that makes pets out of every critter. I look at something and see either food or $$ signs. I really don't know if I could justify buying a mile or so of goat proof fencing. Maybe we could put a few goats in the new chicken run to see if we like them.
My friend had 3 or 4 strand barb on one property line To a Rez. Cattle fence on the other sides. He ran a dog training business in a remote area.
His property was open to customers on Saturday and he then had the goats penned. Gates closed in between sections of property on weekdays to let the goats clear areas.
I dont think you would need miles of net, just temporary if you want a certain area cleared. Since you had cattle, you might have the infrastructure in place.
I would think about them here, but last owners had too many issues with them being Mt Lion bait.
 
My friend had 3 or 4 strand barb on one property line To a Rez. Cattle fence on the other sides. He ran a dog training business in a remote area.
His property was open to customers on Saturday and he then had the goats penned. Gates closed in between sections of property on weekdays to let the goats clear areas.
I dont think you would need miles of net, just temporary if you want a certain area cleared. Since you had cattle, you might have the infrastructure in place.
I would think about them here, but last owners had too many issues with them being Mt Lion bait.
Much of my fencing is typical range fence, 3 strands of barb wire. Some areas have 4 strands, plus all of the new fencing I've built is 4 strand. My thought process is, I really didn't want to be moving fencing around. This time of year it's almost impossible to put posts in the ground, even for temporary fences. Today I drove in 20 T posts × 7'. It was like driving them in concrete. I almost got blisters on my hands from the driver. So, any fencing that I build here has to be permanent, near water and built in the early spring.
 
We haven't had goats all that long, so we are still finding what works for us. Since we have a small herd and no cattle, just having small sections of netting put up works but we do have some permanent fencing, too.

@Danil54grl would be better to clarify for this, but we have found they get sick less if they're intensively grazed/browsed and moved frequently. Ours keep going back to the same things they like and ignore other stuff if they have too much space. They also seem to get sick less on browse than pasture. It's a win-win because they're happier and I don't have to clear underbrush in the woods!

Right now, it has been tricky because the new goats are still in quarantine while await their biosecurity panels. I'm having to get creative.
 
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