Wound Closure post SHTF

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Morgan101

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If you had to provide medical attention during an SHTF scenario do you think you could suture a wound properly? I certainly have my own doubts, and I wouldn't want to suture anybody. Do you include suturing materials in your first aid supplies?

This looked like a pretty good alternative. What do you think?

 

Caribou

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If you had to provide medical attention during an SHTF scenario do you think you could suture a wound properly? I certainly have my own doubts, and I wouldn't want to suture anybody. Do you include suturing materials in your first aid supplies?

This looked like a pretty good alternative. What do you think?

I watched a guy stitch himself up after an altercation with a chainsaw. I wish I had seen that video then. Thanks!
 

joel

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I did something like this & had no ideal I was doing it right/ correct thing.
I cut a stainless steel angle iron on a horizontal band saw, this always leaves a sharp razor edge on one side of the metal, it slipped out of my hand & cut my left wrist, I could see the blood vessel, but the vessel was not cut. I stopped the bleeding & reported it to the manger.
He wanted me to go home, I said only if you make me & he let me stay to end of shift (about four hours).
A coworker said go get adhesive surgical strips, I never heard of AS strips, so I did, & closed the wound, this was a weekend shift.
I had to hunt the scare to make sure it was my left wrist, it has been over ten years, so I did a fair job.
Th bank line tape deal is a great way to close the wound, thanks for the video.
 

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backlash

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I stitched up a pig. Does that count?
My Aunt had a sow that stepped on a piglet. Dad and I happened to stop by to visit and Dad said we would sew it up. By we he meant me.
My Aunt got a needle and thread out of her sewing box and I stitched him up. The pig lived until it was butcher time.
People however would be a very different thing. I wouldn't want to try it unless it was that or they die.
I knew a guy that built remote-controlled things. He had a huge helicopter. One of the main rotor blades came off and hit him in the thigh. He dropped his pants and sewed the gash up then went to check on his helicopter. It was on the ground and suffered very little damage.
He had worked on a fish processing ship for years and said it wasn't uncommon to have to sew someone up.
 

kd4ulw

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As long as the wound isn’t too deep the strips/tape method would be fine unless it’s on a joint that would pull open when bent. Just make sure you aren’t pulling the top skin together over a deep wound, That’s what sutures or staples are for, and also the sutures go deep under the incision so your not just pulling the top of the skin together.
 

winds-of-change

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I stitched up a pig. Does that count?
My Aunt had a sow that stepped on a piglet. Dad and I happened to stop by to visit and Dad said we would sew it up. By we he meant me.
My Aunt got a needle and thread out of her sewing box and I stitched him up. The pig lived until it was butcher time.
People however would be a very different thing. I wouldn't want to try it unless it was that or they die.
I knew a guy that built remote-controlled things. He had a huge helicopter. One of the main rotor blades came off and hit him in the thigh. He dropped his pants and sewed the gash up then went to check on his helicopter. It was on the ground and suffered very little damage.
He had worked on a fish processing ship for years and said it wasn't uncommon to have to sew someone up.
Wow. Pigs are TOUGH. How did you get a needle through its skin and was thread strong enough to hold it unless it was nylon thread or fishing line?
 

Hardcalibres

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Yep. Steristrips, Butterfly wound closures and Dermabond can eliminate most need for stitching.

I have suture kits/supplies as well - but I have those mostly so someone who has done plenty of that will have the materials they need if the injury requires that (more so than intending to use them myself).
 

DrJenner

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We have a large suture kit, but I would definitely advise getting several sizes of steri strips in addition to non-adherent gauze pads and kerlix rolls.
That way if you have a huge gash on the leg, you can irrigate the wound, apply steri strips and then place the non adherent gauze on top of the wound, and wrap with kerlix in order to keep pressure and the wound edges approximated.
 

DrJenner

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Quick clot is great for larger wounds that you can't suture. Dermabond glue is also fantastic.

I remember working ER one time when this dude came in with 3 cops. He was drunk, spitting on everyone to the point he had to wear the spit hood. He had fallen outside the bar, and was super rowdy, cussing and trying to get away from the cops (completely out of control). One of the docs got him, went in, shot 2 staples into his head and then discharged him to police custody. I'm a big fan of the staple gun.
 

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We had a Doctor come in and teach us suturing for our group. He had all of the supplies and taught a very nice hands on class. I may have to set another one up, it was that good.
 

DrJenner

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I think that’s the one I have. I’ve only done larger animals. Needed practice on “humans”.
Human skin isn't as tough as animals, it's more fragile (except in the case of the old leathery farmers who are always out in the sun). It's very easy though to thread a needle through soft fatty tissue, it glides easily.

The easiest thing to do in a pinch is to forget about the curved suture and the needle driver. Use a straight needle with the attached suture and just use your hands to stitch. You can even do individual sutures, just remember the first suture you place has to be the surgeon knot (two throws instead of one) - that way it tacks down and doesn't become loose. The 2nd knot can be a regular knot. Then you can cut, and start over with a new suture if that makes sense.
 

Double R

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Human skin isn't as tough as animals, it's more fragile (except in the case of the old leathery farmers who are always out in the sun). It's very easy though to thread a needle through soft fatty tissue, it glides easily.

The easiest thing to do in a pinch is to forget about the curved suture and the needle driver. Use a straight needle with the attached suture and just use your hands to stitch. You can even do individual sutures, just remember the first suture you place has to be the surgeon knot (two throws instead of one) - that way it tacks down and doesn't become loose. The 2nd knot can be a regular knot. Then you can cut, and start over with a new suture if that makes sense.
That does very much and thank you! 🙏🏼
I’ve done sheep faces after dog attacks which was far different than horses and cows. Sounds similar to what we did for the sheep faces. Much thinner. Even thinner than dog hide. Used our hands over tools for the most part on the sheep.
Decided I needed human practice when Covid started and our hospitals got silly with restrictions. My hubby doesn’t do things small 😉
 

DrJenner

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That does very much and thank you! 🙏🏼
I’ve done sheep faces after dog attacks which was far different than horses and cows. Sounds similar to what we did for the sheep faces. Much thinner. Even thinner than dog hide. Used our hands over tools for the most part on the sheep.
Decided I needed human practice when Covid started and our hospitals got silly with restrictions. My hubby doesn’t do things small 😉
Lol yeah I get that. I am all for staying out of hospitals at this point unless its life threatening. Things have gotten out of hand.
The hand tied sutures are the easiest. I don't really suture much anymore - just suture down central lines or temp dialysis catheters. Occasionally a chest tube - but not often. I usually hand tie as its better control and my old eyes can see it better. Those big complex lacerations I leave to the trauma surgeons :D
 

Peanut

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I've stitched up more than a few critters but never a person. Seen myself stitched up a few times though. As Doc knows, you can see anything in an ER.

Strangest stitching I saw in a hospital was on a tiger from a zoo. A stitched cut reopened when he sort of woke up a little. He was having a catscan while sedated! I kid you not! A zoo brought critters to that hospital a few times a year. When something needed scanned. It was neat to see, I always had to be there in case something unusual was attempted.

Anyway, I have a good staple kit in my gear and a suture kit. I'll do what I need to but I'd rather it be someone more qualified.

Just remember plantain to greatly speed up skin closing over a wound. Especially when you're older.

Plantain
 
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backlash

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I stitched up a piglet that had been stepped on by it's momma. It had a big L shaped rip on the ham.
Dad said we can fix that so my Aunt got her sewing kit out and threaded a needle with white thread we cleaned it up as best we could and went to sewing.
The piglet was in shock and didn't even squeal. He lived so I guess it turned out OK.
I have removed stitches and surgical staples but that's the extent of my surgical experience.

I had forgotten. I super glued a buddies hand once after he tore out the stitches the corpsman put in.
Tip: never play handball after you get your hand stitched up. That greatly annoys the doc.
 
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SoJer

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Fwiw, for those who've never come across this this site - it's Invaluable, Imho.. Closing the Gap :cool:

..Yes, it's 'an Inch wide, and 100' deep, but - Really excellent / focused (and Accurate..) Learning resource.. Highly recommend watching - and DL'ing - All that you possibly can from there.. While we all still Have power and internet.. o_O

jd
 

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I have sutured the family hunting dog with silk thread when I was a teen. She had surgery on a lump and the vet made the incision on the hip/thigh going horizontal. She popped the stitches walking so I cut a bit of the flesh to make a triangle wound and restitched it on the vertical. She healed fine and didn't re-pop the stitches. My dad thought I was nuts for doing it myself. He took her in the morning to a different vet and he was impressed with my work. He just scrubbed the hell out of my work to make sure it was clean.

I reattached my own finger tip with duct tape while camping. I cut it badly on some glass from a broken tail light in the trunk of my ghia. Barely a scar 20 years later.

Roo cut her scalp deeply under her hair at 5 when she fell and hit a wall. I shaved the spot after I stopped the bleeding and used steri-strips to keep it closed.

I think I will be fine using what I have on hand.
 
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