GOLD....

Homesteading & Country Living Forum

Help Support Homesteading & Country Living Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
The Chinese have been hoarding gold for years now. It's not just the government either. The government has been encouraging the citizens to buy as much gold as they can. There was talk a few years ago about them planning on using it to dominate the global currency markets.

Nobody knows how much gold they have because their domestic production is a secret and they have been buying gold from overseas clandestinely.

Here is a report from five years ago:
https://www.moneymetals.com/news/2014/11/25/dramatic-increase-in-gold-flows-into-china-000635
 
I’ve read that both China and Russia have been stocking it away for the last several years. Even big governments are a little worried about the economics. I don’t really think of gold so much as an investment but as an insurance policy. Our currency has been a good standard worldwide for a long run now, but I feel that it’s likely to change before long. Great if I’m wrong, but having a little gold is a good idea.
 
I've been buying gold and silver for over 40 years now. In my opinion a person should hold at least 10-20% of their asset's in gold and silver. Many people will disagree with this amount, that's their choice. Gold has always had great value throughout history, and there's no indication that anything will change that value.
 
Top 15 "Official" gold reserves for third quarter 2019 in metric tonnes
(But we don't really know how much gold China actually has)

U.S.: 8133.46
Germany: 3366.77
Italy: 2451.84
France: 2436.07
Russia: 2219.18
China: 1936.49
Switzerland: 1040.00
Japan: 765.22
India: 618.16
Netherlands: 612.45
Eurozone: 504.80
Saudi Arabia: 323.07
Turkey: 320.69
UK: 310.29 (what the hell happened to you guys?)
Spain: 281.58
 
Top 15 "Official" gold reserves for third quarter 2019 in metric tonnes
(But we don't really know how much gold China actually has)

U.S.: 8133.46
Germany: 3366.77
Italy: 2451.84
France: 2436.07
Russia: 2219.18
China: 1936.49
Switzerland: 1040.00
Japan: 765.22
India: 618.16
Netherlands: 612.45
Eurozone: 504.80
Saudi Arabia: 323.07
Turkey: 320.69
UK: 310.29 (what the hell happened to you guys?)
Spain: 281.58


What happened to us in the UK was a SOCIALIST government in 2009 led by Gordon Brown the stupid bastard sold much of the UKs gold reserves at a QUARTER of its value.
 
I'm not interested in GOLD only Silver, Gold is simply to valuable to be cut up or used in local barter or trading making it borderline useless unless I want to buy Alaska, but silver is a much better bet. Plus silver can be used in medical procudures. I keep some solid silver proof old US dollars and a few UK sovereigns.
 
I'm not interested in GOLD only Silver, Gold is simply to valuable to be cut up or used in local barter or trading making it borderline useless unless I want to buy Alaska, but silver is a much better bet. Plus silver can be used in medical procudures. I keep some solid silver proof old US dollars and a few UK sovereigns.
I agree that gold isn’t as good for day to day barter, at 1500 an ounce it would be hard to shave off a bit for a loaf of bread. I believe silver is around 18 now, better for small trades and purchases. I still feel having some gold on hand is wise though. Of course that is after you have everything else you feel is important is covered.
 
I agree that gold isn’t as good for day to day barter, at 1500 an ounce it would be hard to shave off a bit for a loaf of bread. I believe silver is around 18 now, better for small trades and purchases. I still feel having some gold on hand is wise though. Of course that is after you have everything else you feel is important is covered.

I spose in the US you could use gold to pay the next three years of your state taxes in advance if the S started hitting the fan, so the government could not use none tax payment to seize your land after a collapse?
 
Gold is for large purchases, silver is for day to day stuff. There are small gold coins like the 0.059 oz gold quarter Sovereign but they are still too big to buy a cup of coffee (melt value $88.50). A silver dime would be just about right for a cup of coffee (melt value $1.25). Or ersatz coffee, as the case may be...
 
Gold is for large purchases, silver is for day to day stuff. There are small gold coins like the 0.059 oz gold quarter Sovereign but they are still too big to buy a cup of coffee (melt value $88.50). A silver dime would be just about right for a cup of coffee (melt value $1.25). Or ersatz coffee, as the case may be...
Excellent analogy.
 
It would be a little foolish to think that all purchases after SHTF will be small amounts. I agree that silver would be better used for many small day to day items, but gold would be better for larger items; i.e., horse, cow, plow, land etc. You can get gold in as small as 1/10th oz coins or as large as 100-500 oz bars.
For my prepping needs I like having gold and silver, in coins, rounds, bars and nuggets, plus precious stones.
 
The problem with precious stones is figuring how much they are worth. I'm always amused at movies in which the bad guy wants to be paid in diamonds. They hand him a box or bag of "diamonds" and he takes one look and is satisfied.

How can someone glance at a bag of diamonds and know how much they are worth? For that matter, how can someone just glance at a bag of "diamonds" and know they are not cubic zirconium? They have to be individually graded by a diamond expert, which would take forever. Here is how diamond expert Adriana Krakowski grades diamonds:

The four steps in Krakowski’s diamond authentication process:
Observation
Each piece is inspected with a 10x loupe under a diamond grading lamp,” explains Krakowski. “I observe the diamond from all angles, which is necessary for color grading, clarity grading, and assessing the condition of the stone as well as proportion and symmetry.”​
Measurement
“I use a leverage gauge to take measurements of the average girdle diameter and depth of the diamond so that the carat weight can be calculated. There are various formulas and adjustment factors used for the different cutting styles and proportions.”​
Analysis
“Next I analyze all of the grading factors together — some may contribute to a strong value for the diamond, and some elements might diminish value,” says Krakowski. In the end, the diamond’s value will be determined by this combination of factors.​
Pricing
“A document called the Rapaport Diamond Report assists most industry professionals in pricing diamonds,” notes Krakowski. “It is based on a pricing matrix that fluctuates based on the carat size, color and clarity of the diamond. For each size matrix, there are 110 different per carat values that a diamond can have. These values are then interpreted based on the complete set of grading characteristics and current market demand.”​
Diamond Grading
When it comes to diamond grading, Krakowski emphasizes the importance of the industry standards established by the Gemological Institute of America. “GIA invented the diamond grading system. The only trusted standards are those outlined by the GIA,” she says.​

Krakowski’s guide to the four Cs:
Cut
“I judge a diamond’s cut by looking at the proportion, symmetry and polish as they relate to GIA grading standards of cutting. The GIA rating scale for cut goes from excellent to very good, good, fair and poor. The cut is what makes a diamond sparkle!”​
Color
“Color is judged observing the absence of color in the diamond. A chemically pure and structurally perfect diamond has no hue. GIA’s D-to-Z diamond color-grading system measures the degree of colorlessness by comparing a stone under controlled lighting and precise viewing conditions to masterstones of established color value,” notes Krakowski. “Gemologists at The RealReal use this same practice to grade color.”​
Clarity
“Judging diamond clarity involves observing the presence of internal characteristics called inclusions. The fewer visible clarity characteristics a diamond has, the higher the clarity grade will be.”​
Carat
“Determining carat weight is done by a series of precise measurements and calculations. If the diamond is not mounted in a piece of jewelry, I weigh it on a carat scale.”​
Diamond Valuation
Diamond Grading & Authentication“A diamond’s value is based on its quality and market demand, which is a combination of rarity and desirability,” says Krakowski. “The main factors that contribute to the quality are the 4 Cs — carat size, cut, color and clarity — but there are many other factors that I look at when grading.” While most of the important factors of a diamond’s quality and authenticity are documented in a stone’s certificate from the GIA, there is a key factor that must be determined at the time of inspection: market demand. “Diamond valuation involves understanding what the market is looking for and what is too available to support any kind of premium. Style plays a big part in the value as well. For example, in today’s market a marquise cut diamond is not as popular as a round brilliant cut diamond so the marquise cut diamond would not get as much strength in its value because it will be a harder stone to sell.”​

The 5 factors, according to Krakowski, that give a piece value include :
1. The intrinsic or commodity value of the metals and stones.
2. The quality of craftsmanship and materials.
3. The market demand for the specific type, brand, style or period of the item.
4. The availability or rarity of the item within the secondary market.
5. The cost that an industry professional would incur to manufacture the item.​
 
Last edited:
The problem with precious stones is figuring how much they are worth. I'm always amused at movies in which the bad guy wants to be paid in diamonds. They hand him a box or bag of "diamonds" and he takes one look and is satisfied.

How can someone glance at a bag of diamonds and know how much they are worth? For that matter, how can someone just glance at a bag of "diamonds" and know they are not cubic zirconium? They have to be individually graded by a diamond expert, which would take forever. Here is how diamond expert Adriana Krakowski grades diamonds:

The four steps in Krakowski’s diamond authentication process:
Observation
Each piece is inspected with a 10x loupe under a diamond grading lamp,” explains Krakowski. “I observe the diamond from all angles, which is necessary for color grading, clarity grading, and assessing the condition of the stone as well as proportion and symmetry.”​
Measurement
“I use a leverage gauge to take measurements of the average girdle diameter and depth of the diamond so that the carat weight can be calculated. There are various formulas and adjustment factors used for the different cutting styles and proportions.”​
Analysis
“Next I analyze all of the grading factors together — some may contribute to a strong value for the diamond, and some elements might diminish value,” says Krakowski. In the end, the diamond’s value will be determined by this combination of factors.​
Pricing
“A document called the Rapaport Diamond Report assists most industry professionals in pricing diamonds,” notes Krakowski. “It is based on a pricing matrix that fluctuates based on the carat size, color and clarity of the diamond. For each size matrix, there are 110 different per carat values that a diamond can have. These values are then interpreted based on the complete set of grading characteristics and current market demand.”​
Diamond Grading
When it comes to diamond grading, Krakowski emphasizes the importance of the industry standards established by the Gemological Institute of America. “GIA invented the diamond grading system. The only trusted standards are those outlined by the GIA,” she says.​

Krakowski’s guide to the four Cs:
Cut
“I judge a diamond’s cut by looking at the proportion, symmetry and polish as they relate to GIA grading standards of cutting. The GIA rating scale for cut goes from excellent to very good, good, fair and poor. The cut is what makes a diamond sparkle!”​
Color
“Color is judged observing the absence of color in the diamond. A chemically pure and structurally perfect diamond has no hue. GIA’s D-to-Z diamond color-grading system measures the degree of colorlessness by comparing a stone under controlled lighting and precise viewing conditions to masterstones of established color value,” notes Krakowski. “Gemologists at The RealReal use this same practice to grade color.”​
Clarity
“Judging diamond clarity involves observing the presence of internal characteristics called inclusions. The fewer visible clarity characteristics a diamond has, the higher the clarity grade will be.”​
Carat
“Determining carat weight is done by a series of precise measurements and calculations. If the diamond is not mounted in a piece of jewelry, I weigh it on a carat scale.”​
Diamond Valuation
Diamond Grading & Authentication“A diamond’s value is based on its quality and market demand, which is a combination of rarity and desirability,” says Krakowski. “The main factors that contribute to the quality are the 4 Cs — carat size, cut, color and clarity — but there are many other factors that I look at when grading.” While most of the important factors of a diamond’s quality and authenticity are documented in a stone’s certificate from the GIA, there is a key factor that must be determined at the time of inspection: market demand. “Diamond valuation involves understanding what the market is looking for and what is too available to support any kind of premium. Style plays a big part in the value as well. For example, in today’s market a marquise cut diamond is not as popular as a round brilliant cut diamond so the marquise cut diamond would not get as much strength in its value because it will be a harder stone to sell.”​

The 5 factors, according to Krakowski, that give a piece value include :
1. The intrinsic or commodity value of the metals and stones.
2. The quality of craftsmanship and materials.
3. The market demand for the specific type, brand, style or period of the item.
4. The availability or rarity of the item within the secondary market.
5. The cost that an industry professional would incur to manufacture the item.​
I agree with you about precious stones, and I would never advocate buying precious stones primarily for post SHTF. But in my travels around the world I've come across some really good deals on cut and uncut rubys, emeralds, sapphires, diamonds and others. I've had all stones tested for genuine untreated stones. I combine investing with prepping. It makes sense to me because there's a good chance that there won't be a major SHTF event in my lifetime.
 
I agree with you about precious stones, and I would never advocate buying precious stones primarily for post SHTF. But in my travels around the world I've come across some really good deals on cut and uncut rubys, emeralds, sapphires, diamonds and others. I've had all stones tested for genuine untreated stones. I combine investing with prepping. It makes sense to me because there's a good chance that there won't be a major SHTF event in my lifetime.
Investing is just a form of prepping. A lot of my preps aren’t done just for the shtf scenario. No one knows when the world is going to throw them a curve ball so it’s smart to put your hard earned rewards away somewhere safe for those times.
 
Gold has been on a steady upward trend for two months now...
kYrVog1.gif
 
Wishing I had bought more as it is going to skyrocket! What else can it do with China, and Central Banks aka WEFers, buying up huge amounts? Our fiat dollar will crash. Just a matter of time. The biden Regime will swoop in with digital dollars and try to force them upon us all…they will be equally worthless as the default dollar with nothing backing them. The question is, will the world revert to Yuan?
 
Wishing I had bought more as it is going to skyrocket! What else can it do with China, and Central Banks aka WEFers, buying up huge amounts? Our fiat dollar will crash. Just a matter of time. The biden Regime will swoop in with digital dollars and try to force them upon us all…they will be equally worthless as the default dollar with nothing backing them. The question is, will the world revert to Yuan?
Start looking at SILVER, Its next!
 
Wishing I had bought more as it is going to skyrocket! What else can it do with China, and Central Banks aka WEFers, buying up huge amounts? Our fiat dollar will crash. Just a matter of time. The biden Regime will swoop in with digital dollars and try to force them upon us all…they will be equally worthless as the default dollar with nothing backing them. The question is, will the world revert to Yuan?
BICRAP can put his DIGITAL currency somewhere the sun has difficulty shining upon!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 
Last year I sold some of my gold stash to pay off our medical bills. It looks like I'll be selling more soon to pay off our current medical bills. I've been accumulating gold, silver and gemstones ever since I was a kid in the late 60's. Beginning in the 80's I owned several gold placer mines. Besides saving gold nuggets that I mined I started buying gold and silver coins and bars, plus palladium. I have no intention of buying any more gold, personally it's about $1000 per oz more than I'm willing to pay for it. However, last summer I found an old placer mine about 3 miles from our house. I'm going to do some sampling there this spring and see if it'll be worth mining. There are countless old lode mines all around our place too. I may take some samples and see if any are worth reopening.
 
Last year I sold some of my gold stash to pay off our medical bills. It looks like I'll be selling more soon to pay off our current medical bills. I've been accumulating gold, silver and gemstones ever since I was a kid in the late 60's. Beginning in the 80's I owned several gold placer mines. Besides saving gold nuggets that I mined I started buying gold and silver coins and bars, plus palladium. I have no intention of buying any more gold, personally it's about $1000 per oz more than I'm willing to pay for it. However, last summer I found an old placer mine about 3 miles from our house. I'm going to do some sampling there this spring and see if it'll be worth mining. There are countless old lode mines all around our place too. I may take some samples and see if any are worth reopening.
At the price of gold now some of the old less profitable mines are worth looking into!!
 
Back
Top