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How To Preserve Extra Eggs

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Meerkat

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We now have 13 dozen eggs so we are going to scrable ,boil and freeze some.
We do have a dehydrator but not in mood to go to that trouble. Some can theri eggs too that ain't gonna happen here today either.Staying with the KISS aka keep it simple stupid theory.
 

Supervisor42

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Old Grouch that sounds like a good idea. :thumbs:
Whatever happened to pickled eggs?
They were on every bar I sat at back in the day.

Going by the ingredients, it doesn't look that complicated.
 

WVDragonlady

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Back when large eggs were 77 cents a doz I bought a bunch and froze them. I have 24 silicone muffin cups that I used. Made it real easy to get them out. Just peel the cup away from them. I then vacuum sealed them
I did have to use a muffin tin to stabilize them better.
Worked great.
Of course they're only good for frying and baking since freezing them makes the white more "runny" but hey better than nothing

Glad I did that now. I realized today that I must of heard a word in my ear to buy extra and freeze them. Just like I stocked up on a lot of things in the last 6 months. I got a nudge so I followed it
 

joel

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This is what I found from M.E.N. :How to Store Fresh Eggs | MOTHER EARTH NEWS

  • Eggs should be stored with their pointed ends down and should not be washed until just before use, because they have a protective coating that inhibits bacteria.
  • Fresh eggs will keep for several months in refrigeration.
  • Leftover separated egg whites and yolks can be stored in the refrigerator in airtight containers for a few days.
  • Egg foams, such as for meringue pie, benefit from the use of aged egg whites. To age egg whites, store them in a vented (not airtight) container in the refrigerator for a few days before use.
  • To freeze eggs for long-term storage, mix the yolks and whites together lightly (do not beat) and freeze them in an airtight container. For convenient use later, crack individual eggs in a lightly greased bowl and freeze; then pop them into baggies once they’re frozen. Thaw them in the refrigerator before use.
  • Eggshells are porous, so they take on odors. You may not want to store them next to stinky cheese. You can use this tendency to your advantage, however, by intentionally permeating the shells with an aromatic vanilla bean or one pricey truffle.
  • Bring eggs to room temperature before use unless your recipe specifically says not to do so.
  • Fresher eggs usually taste better and are ideal if they will be cooked gently. If you need hard-boiled eggs, as for deviled eggs, older ones will be much easier to peel.
  • Frozen Eggs
Here's how to freeze eggs so you can store all those fresh eggs for winter use:
Break two new-laid eggs into a small bowl. Using a clean knife stir the eggs to roughly mix yolk and white — do not beat.
Lightly oil a Pyrex custard cup. Pour in the eggs and freeze. Do as many eggs as you have and want to put up. When frozen solid, tip eggs into a freezer bag, fitting in as many as possible. Zip tight and freeze. You can add frozen eggs until the bag is full.
Two eggs seems to be the most useful amount for baking and to eat. They are thawed in the refrigerator, covered, beaten into milk, etc. and used just like fresh eggs, to scramble, make omelets, cakes and so forth
  • Frozen Eggs
Here's how to freeze eggs so you can store all those fresh eggs for winter use:
Break two new-laid eggs into a small bowl. Using a clean knife stir the eggs to roughly mix yolk and white — do not beat.
Lightly oil a Pyrex custard cup. Pour in the eggs and freeze. Do as many eggs as you have and want to put up. When frozen solid, tip eggs into a freezer bag, fitting in as many as possible. Zip tight and freeze. You can add frozen eggs until the bag is full.
Two eggs seems to be the most useful amount for baking and to eat. They are thawed in the refrigerator, covered, beaten into milk, etc. and used just like fresh eggs, to scramble, make omelets, cakes and so forth
  • Frozen Eggs
Here's how to freeze eggs so you can store all those fresh eggs for winter use:
Break two new-laid eggs into a small bowl. Using a clean knife stir the eggs to roughly mix yolk and white — do not beat.
Lightly oil a Pyrex custard cup. Pour in the eggs and freeze. Do as many eggs as you have and want to put up. When frozen solid, tip eggs into a freezer bag, fitting in as many as possible. Zip tight and freeze. You can add frozen eggs until the bag is full.
Two eggs seems to be the most useful amount for baking and to eat. They are thawed in the refrigerator, covered, beaten into milk, etc. and used just like fresh eggs, to scramble, make omelets, cakes and so forth

I agree with Superviser42. I think pickling is a good ideal. You can store pickled egg from two weeks to one year. You can flavor them with ginger,garlic,onions, hot peppers, what ever you want to add.
 

SheepDog

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You can store the unwashed eggs in a solution of sodium silicate (waterglass) for months without refrigeration.
 

Meerkat

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I'm gonna have to try freezing them :) The girls are 7 now and really slowing down on the eggs.

DadeM, I figure if we scramble or fry them they will already be cooked and readt to eat after thawing in fridge. Of course for baking we need to freeze some stir them very easy then freeze like Joel said in his post. @joel thanks Joel.
 

lilmissy

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I have froze them before by just breaking open and putting in cupcake tins, then in a baggie. I hated them. To me they were chunky when used for baking. Like parts of the yellow stayed in a chunk. Let me know if it works for you cause obviously I didnt do it correctly.
 

Meerkat

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I have froze them before by just breaking open and putting in cupcake tins, then in a baggie. I hated them. To me they were chunky when used for baking. Like parts of the yellow stayed in a chunk. Let me know if it works for you cause obviously I didnt do it correctly.
I'll let you know soon as we find out ,LilMissy.
 

kd4ulw

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I have froze them before by just breaking open and putting in cupcake tins, then in a baggie. I hated them. To me they were chunky when used for baking. Like parts of the yellow stayed in a chunk. Let me know if it works for you cause obviously I didnt do it correctly.
I read where you need to mix the yolk and the white a little bit together, though not beaten with intensity, after you put them into the muffin tins and then freeze them.
 

Peanut

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@Meerkat Do you have a copy of "The Encyclopedia of Country Living"?

I have a copy of the 10th edition... In it are two methods the old timers used for storing eggs several months at room temperature.

1. The first is using Lard and Salt
2. The other is using Lime and Salt.

Mother Earth News tested both methods... successfully.

The print is tiny, it's late and I'm a bit tired... if you are interested I'll try to type it out tomorrow. 🙂
 

Hooch

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I used the lime water solution , put the eggs in the solution in a food grade bucket with a lid and they kept very well over winter. I noticed the whites at around 8 months were alittle runny but otherwise..it worked. Being that I only need storage for over winter months here 4-5 months before the girls start kicking the eggs out again..It seemed another good way. I think I will freeze some too this year n give that a try as well...
 

Meerkat

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So far the egg test got about a C ,eggsalad was a little rubbery on the whites,but not too bad. Flavor was still good and passed.Srambled eggs not tested yet.But they looked just like scrabled eggs after thawed ,but no taste test done because we were up all night.
 

Grumpy521

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The jars I posted are super simple and delicious. I use a bunch of different recipes but this is the quickest and easiest.
1 quart Mason jar
9 or ten hard boiled eggs (enough to fill the jar and don't worry about head space.
Pack the eggs in the jar
Fill 3/4 to top with your favorite wing sauce( I use Frank's Red Hot)
Fill the rest to top with white vinegar
Stick it in the fridge for nine days
Enjoy!
 

Meerkat

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The jars I posted are super simple and delicious. I use a bunch of different recipes but this is the quickest and easiest.
1 quart Mason jar
9 or ten hard boiled eggs (enough to fill the jar and don't worry about head space.
Pack the eggs in the jar
Fill 3/4 to top with your favorite wing sauce( I use Frank's Red Hot)
Fill the rest to top with white vinegar
Stick it in the fridge for nine days
Enjoy!

Grumpy what can we replace the hot sauce with?
 

Supervisor42

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Grumpy what can we replace the hot sauce with?
They have to be spicy to keep guys from eating a bunch of them.
I can tell you that if you eat 6 or 8 of 'em and wash them down with 8-10 Budweiser's, the next morning you will release gas that will make WW1 trench-warfare mustard-gas seem like child's play.panic.gif gaah
(not that I ever did that, it was my brother🤪)
 

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