9 Types Of Foods You Don’t Want To Stockpile

Discussion in 'Prepping Talk' started by Sentry18, Sep 10, 2019.

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  1. Sep 11, 2019 #31

    LadyLocust

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    These lists always kinda make me laugh. The standard American diet is sugar/grain based. Vegetarianism is promoted as healthy as grain crops are so heavily subsidized by the gov. Hubby and I don't eat (or seldom eat) most of the items on the list. If there is a situation where one's stockpile is a matter of survival, proper nourishment will be key over "comfort" or "junk" food. (My opinion) more folks should eat in such a way now even though not necessary. The sky-rocketing obesity rate and associated health issues (heart, diabetes, etc) that go along with are a huge indicator of the lack of value in regards to health. "We" as a nation like easy even if it means being sick. (And yes, I consider obesity an illness.) In a SHTF scenario, I think many people would have a rude awakening. We were created to eat a certain way. If you think about it, nobody is allergic to meat/animal fat and vegies. Diabetics can't have sugar/carbs. Many people are allergic to milk, shellfish, or nuts. These are things we probably shouldn't be eating even if we don't have physical adversities to them.
    It might sound pretty Hard A** of me but let me assure you. I drink coffee every morning, am working on losing about 5 lbs., and my favorite food in the world is peanutbutter. I would feel it if the situation arose. This is all my 2 c. - feel free to disregard.
     
  2. Sep 11, 2019 #32

    Curmudgeon

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    Wait, what? No milk? Sacrilege I say, lol.
     
  3. Sep 11, 2019 #33

    Sentry18

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    I grew up in a house where my Mom was allergic to cow's milk and now I have 4 kids with cow's milk sensitivities as well, so it has just never been a thing for us. Besides I don't think it tastes that good and I am not a huge believer in drinking other species breast milk. That's just weird.
     
  4. Sep 11, 2019 #34

    Sentry18

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    The only part about this I wasn't in full agreement with was the part about you drinking coffee every morning. Another beverage I can do without. ;)
     
  5. Sep 11, 2019 #35

    Tacitus

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    So...I totally get this.

    And yet, a lot of what we eat is "weird" if you think about it too much. Do you enjoy jello? That has to be one of the weirdest foods we eat. Some people think eating other species muscle is weird...but I think we all agree that is better than same species muscle.

    Milk gave a certain subset of the population an advantage during the dark years of famine and epidemic of Dark & Middle Aged Europe. All kids have lactose tolerance, but the gene for adult lactose tolerance went from a quarter of the population to 80% (and even 100% in some places) in Europe in a very short time. The speculation is that those who could drink "other species breast milk" (or eat products made from that substance) had a survival advantage (and therefore a reproductive advantage, and therefore an advantage in changing the gene pool) over those who did not have adult tolerance for lactose. In bad times, I will consume to refuel; weirdness will not be an issue for me. I will even eat jello.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
  6. Sep 11, 2019 #36

    hiwall

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    No Spam in this house!
    We do store shelf-stable milk along with several different long-term storage varieties. I use milk in countless recipes.
     
  7. Sep 11, 2019 #37

    Caribou

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    Drinking other species breast milk is weird? I've got to ask, do you eat eggs? I store wheat, rice, and other grains. I found out that my ability to deal with carbs, due to diabetes, is very limited. I now have a lifetime supply of rice and wheat. I'll not get rid of this supply as I still can used these foods in an emergency. Their status has gone from being in my rotation to long term storage.
     
  8. Sep 11, 2019 #38

    Sentry18

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    I will if I have to choose between death or an omelet. But I will gladly kill it's mother and cook her in a rotisserie. I do have powdered milk and dehydrated eggs in my preps. Because as @Tacitus said, when survival is on the line weirdness will not be a factor. But now when I have a choice I will not be eating anything designed only to feed my food or crack and have more of my food walk out of it.
     
  9. Sep 11, 2019 #39

    Meerkat

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    I haven't heard George Noorey aka Coast to Coast am in a long time but last night couldn't sleep and he was on radio.
    He had a Dr on about eating and said he eats about 12 eggs a day collesterol is actually good for your heart and brain. He also likes meat and berries but not fruit. Said since statins came out heart attacks have risen.

    The man is 81 and sounds like a young man.
    https://criticalhealthnews.com/
     
  10. Sep 11, 2019 #40

    Spikedriver

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    We're not fat because of what we eat, we're fat because of how much we eat. Hamburger Helper isn't that nutritious, of course, bit it's fattening because people eat the whole damn pan. A burger isn't fattening, but a half pound bacon cheeseburger with super size fries is terrible. Europeans eat half as much as us. They're aghast at our portion sizes. And they're not nearly as far as us...
     
  11. Sep 11, 2019 #41

    Meerkat

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    Spike this is very true.
     
  12. Sep 11, 2019 #42

    Sentry18

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    I would suggest it's both. Corn syrups, colors, preservatives, chemicals, and unnatural food-like products have destroyed our bodies abilities to properly process nutrition, regulate hormones, and control normal body processes. You don't have to eat mass quantities to be overweight or obese, but of course that gets you there a whole lot faster.
     
  13. Sep 11, 2019 #43

    Spikedriver

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    I would also hold that our levels of physical activity are sadly lacking. We as a society do not get anywhere under our own power. My grandma used to talk about walking everywhere. It was nothing to walk two miles back then, because you wouldn't fire up the car just for that! Nowadays I'm tempted to drive if I have to go a half a mile...
     
  14. Sep 11, 2019 #44

    joel

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    http://www.ncausa.org/about-coffee/how-to-store-coffee
    Keep beans airtight and cool
    Your beans’ greatest enemies are air, moisture, heat, and light.

    To preserve your beans’ fresh roasted flavor as long as possible, store them in an opaque, air-tight container at room temperature. Coffee beans can be beautiful, but avoid clear canisters which will allow light to compromise the taste of your coffee.

    Keep your beans in a dark and cool location. A cabinet near the oven is often too warm, and so is a spot on the kitchen counter that gets strong afternoon sun.

    Coffee's retail packaging is generally not ideal for long-term storage. If possible, invest in storage canisters with an airtight seal.

    Buy the right amount
    Coffee begins to lose freshness almost immediately after roasting. Try to buy smaller batches of freshly roasted coffee more frequently - enough for one or two weeks.

    Exposure to air is bad for your beans. If you prefer to keep your beans in an accessible and/or attractive container, it may be a good good idea to divide your coffee supply into several smaller portions, with the larger, unused portion in an air-tight container.

    This is especially important when buying pre-ground coffee, because of the increased exposure to oxygen. If you buy whole beans, grind the amount you need immediately before brewing.
     
  15. Sep 11, 2019 #45

    joel

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    https://www.dandelionchocolate.com/...nce-for-keeping-chocolate-bars-at-their-best/


    Long-term storage for up to five years:

    ● For cellaring chocolate and holding on to vintage bars, I recommend using a wine fridge set to 50°F. Note that a regular kitchen refrigerator may have strong food odors and it is often too cold for the task (below 40°F). Greg, our Chocolate Sourcerer, and Todd, our CEO and co-founder, set their chocolate refrigerators to 50°F. If chocolate gets too cold or undergoes a temperature shock, condensation can form and potentially cause sugar bloom. Sugar bloom changes the texture and appearance of the bar. It occurs when the sugar in the bar absorbs water and, when the water evaporates, it recrystallizes on the surface of the bar. It’s still safe to eat, but the chocolate’s appearance and texture make it better for baking.

    ● Never freeze chocolate for all of the same reasons as above.

    ● All of our chocolate bars have a “best if used by” date of one year from production. This is the time period during which we’re confident that the flavor notes you’ll taste in our bars will be as close as possible to when the bar was first tempered. That said, the flavors in our bars evolve over time, and some chocolate even improves with age.

    ● After a year or two in storage, it’s possible for chocolate to start looking dull and a bit grey on the surface and acquire a brittle, chalky texture. Over time, cocoa butter transforms into an even more stable polymorph known as Form VI or VI. As long as you’re storing the chocolate in controlled conditions, it should be safe to eat for several years.

    ● Chocolate like ours with just cacao beans and sugar tends to be shelf stable. You don’t need to worry about two-ingredient chocolate going bad. In milk chocolate or bars that have nuts, those other ingredients can become rancid over an extended period of time.
     
  16. Sep 11, 2019 #46

    Spikedriver

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    Yikes, 12 eggs a day...I'd be sick of that real quick...

    I think the saying "everything in moderation" applies. Eat some meat. Eat some grain. Eat some fruit. Some Dairy. Some greens. Some legumes. A little whatever, is good! Too much whatever, probably isn't. And I'm the worst at following my own advice. But I've seen too many people who, if you went off the expert's advise, should have been looking up at the inside of a coffin lid by age 50...but they were still kicking ass in their 70s. The common denominator seems to be common sense and being active and having a positive outlook...

    But back to stored food - Spam (and similar meat like products) are far from natural. Some would say, far from healthy, too. Milk might not be that natural for adults but it's a protein powerhouse. But, Survival favors eating whatever the hell you can. I'm not big on these lists of "Do this, not that". Can you make it work for you and yours? If yes, then in my mind, it's all good...
     
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  17. Sep 11, 2019 #47

    Tacitus

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    I've often thought of storing protein powder (the stuff that weight lifters take). Not sure how long it will last on a shelf.
    Agreed!
     
  18. Sep 12, 2019 at 1:47 AM #48

    Sewingcreations15

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    @Tacitus the protein powder manufacturers recommend using it within 2 years of the manufacture date although I would imagine it would last longer. If you stock it use it and rotate it through for varying expiry dates.
     
  19. Sep 12, 2019 at 1:53 AM #49

    Sewingcreations15

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    We stock what we eat here as it makes sense to us and that is both tinned and frozen varieties and long life tinned meat and veg and spam (low salt). Cooking chocolate we have in stock.

    @Sentry18 I understand about lactose intolerance as both my children were born with a lactose intolerance as well as an intolerance to artificial colours, flavours and preservatives. They were brought up on a farm eating spray free fruit and veg from the gardens with very little lollies etc. If you were brought up not drinking milk then it would also be foreign to you and your metabolism.

    I am also rather intolerant to artificial things in foods so tend to stock and eat the most natural things we can.
     
  20. Sep 12, 2019 at 5:06 AM #50

    lonewolf

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    I stay away from chocolate it tends to "bung" me up.
    I think the writer of that piece has missed the point, our stockpile of canned and dried food is not to replace the fresh food we normally eat its to SUPPLEMENT it when we cant get fresh.
     
  21. Sep 12, 2019 at 5:16 AM #51

    Sewingcreations15

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    @lonewolf that is exactly how I view tinned foods too and we use them here and rotate them as part of our normal diet and use them when vegetables and fruits are expensive here. Things like tinned fruits have been proven through research to have the same amount of vitamins as fresh. Also the water content in them is a backup water supply as well should you not be able to find water or have it stored (unlikely here).
     
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  22. Sep 12, 2019 at 7:10 AM #52

    lonewolf

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    yes that's how we use our canned stuff too. "rotate, rotate, rotate"- "store what you eat, eat what you store".
    water isn't a concern here as its a mild climate and we get plenty of rainfall.
     
  23. Sep 12, 2019 at 1:00 PM #53

    LadyLocust

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    I so agree with this! My latest nemesis is yellow #5 (& continually color preservatives.) Cows milk was a great source of both healthy fats and protein before all the antibiotics and hormones etc.
    Folks seem to worry about protein, but your body can make protein out of fat. It's fat in conjunction with sugars that lead to various health issues. Having a source/supply of lard & butter or animals on hoof should make the list, but do not have a long shelf life so need to be worked through the rotation on a regular basis. This is where aged cheeses can be valuable.
    Also, a tid-bit ~ Inuits lived on whale blubber 9+ mo./yr with no heart illness or diabetes until "white man" introduced his food items.
     
  24. Sep 12, 2019 at 2:43 PM #54

    Amish Heart

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    Our daughter got to experience whale meat, skin, and blubber while in Alaska recently. She sent photos. Looked bleech. Husband is very allergic to yellow dye #5. Makes his asthma go nuts.
    Aged cheese are something I want to experiment with
     
  25. Sep 12, 2019 at 3:35 PM #55

    joel

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    Ham,bacon,egg, honey, fish & milk comes from farms, not store.
    So if you have a farm you do not need a store.
    Oh & vegetables,nuts & fruit does too.
     
  26. Sep 12, 2019 at 4:48 PM #56

    LadyLocust

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    Interesting! It's my asthma/breathing and skin that has made me question it. We don't eat many 'chemicals' but I like yellow cheeses. I will be looking for more natural options.
     
  27. Sep 12, 2019 at 6:56 PM #57

    Amish Heart

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    Haven't noticed it in yellow cheese (proper cheese, not Kraft singles), but it's in a lot of processed foods. Mac and cheese powder, gummy worms, candy corn....
    Common allergy for asthmatics. Also aspirin.
     
  28. Sep 12, 2019 at 6:59 PM #58

    Terri9630

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    I don't know about the store bought cheese but all the recipes I've seen call for annato to give cheese the yellow color.
     
  29. Sep 12, 2019 at 7:07 PM #59

    Amish Heart

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    Wonder if it's yellow 5 or another yellow number? How about just leave the dye out? I don't dye the butter I make. I salt it some, but don't dye it.
     
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  30. Sep 13, 2019 at 6:33 AM #60

    William Egan

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    Honey is probably better for wounds than sugar and better for you. There is a lot of fake honey these days to but you can tell if its real honey by putting about 1 teaspoon in a flat bottom dish and cover it in cool water, then swirl it around several times. It it starts to resembles a honey comb if its real honey, totally amazing.
     

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