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Canning Beans.

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Tank-Girl

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Ok with starting on a plant based diet to get my cholesterol under control I'm going to start canning beans
so I have them on the shelf and meal ready.

Do I soak them first?
How full would I fill a pint jar?
Salt?
Pressure can for how long?

Are there any beans that can better than others and do they have dif. canning times.

Thank you!
 

joel

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Preserving Method: Pressure Canning
Makes about 1 quart

Extend the pleasure of your garden's bounty when you have ready-to-use green beans available in your own pantry.

YOU WILL NEED

*You must process at least 2 quart jars or 4 pint jars in the pressure canner at one time to ensure safe processing.


DIRECTIONS
  1. PREPARE boiling water canner. Heat jars in simmering water until ready for use. Do not boil. Wash lids in warm soapy water and set bands aside.
  2. WASH and rinse beans thoroughly. Remove string, trim ends and break or cut freshly gathered beans into 2-inch pieces. Place prepared beans in a large saucepan and cover with boiling water. Boil for 5 minutes.
  3. PACK hot beans into hot jars leaving 1 inch headspace. Add 1 tsp salt to each quart jar, 1/2 tsp to each pint jar, if desired.
  4. LADLE boiling water over beans leaving 1 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rim. Center hot lid on jar. Apply band and adjust until fit is fingertip tight.
  5. PROCESS filled jars in a pressure canner at 10 pounds pressure 20 minutes for pints and 25 minutes for quarts, adjusting for altitude. Remove jars and cool. Check lids for seal after 24 hours. Lid should not flex up and down when center is pressed.
Note: The processing time given applies only to young, tender pods. Beans that have almost reached the “shell-out" stage require a longer processing time. Increase processing time 15 minutes for pints and 20 minutes for quarts.

https://www.freshpreserving.com/canning-green-beans--pressure-canning--ball-fresh-preserving-br1039.html
 

joel

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DRY BEANS

You are here: Home / Farming/Homesteading / Step-By-Step Guide to Pressure Can Dried Beans
Step-By-Step Guide to Pressure Can Dried Beans
November 9, 2015 by Susan Vinskofski 10 Comments








Why Pressure Can Dried Beans
I’m the girl who’s not in love with canning. I much prefer to preserve my garden produce by dehydration or lacto-fermentation because both methods do a much better job of preserving nutrients.


Canning does have its place, and I do can tomatoes and sauce, and maybe a few jars of applesauce.



DISCLOSURE: In order for me to pay my blogging expenses, I may receive monetary compensation for my endorsement and/or link to products mentioned on this blog. I am a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
And I can dried beans (legumes). That may be surprising, since storing the beans dried is so easy. Here’s my reasoning. Somedays I just like to have something available that’s fast and easy. And cooking dried beans is anything but fast.

I’ve cooked extra beans and froze them, and that works fine, but I need my freezer space for the meat we buy from local farmers.

One of Mike’s favorite meals is homemade chili. It’s really an easy meal, except for those beans. So, while I keep dried beans on hand, I inevitably end up with store-bought cans of kidney beans on my shelf to throw in chili when I haven’t thought things out ahead of time and haven’t soaked and cooked beans.

Get it? I’m into fast food; just not the kind you find at those franchise restaurants.

Soooo, that’s why I can beans.



© Depositphotos.com/[MonaMakela] – Terms and Conditions
Because beans have very little natural acid, they must be processed using a pressure canner, rather than a water bath canner. And that’s why I have a gorgeous, made-in-America, All American Pressure Canner.


When I was trying to decide which pressure canner to purchase, I asked my Facebook fans for some advice. And they really had some great things to say.

While the All American is a more expensive canner, the quality is far superior to anything else out there. And the fact that it does not use a gasket to create a tight seal means no gaskets to replace. Those things can be pricey.

I checked out used All American’s online, and I was amazed to find out that they cost almost as much as new. That kinda’ sealed the deal for me. If they can retain their value like that, I’m in.

Before starting, be sure you are familiar with your pressure canner. The user guide that came with your canner is a valuable reference.






Step 1. Soak the Beans
Soaking beans (legumes) helps to insure that they are easily digested. In Nourishing Traditions, the author says that soaking:

ensures that legumes will be thoroughly digestible and all the nutrients they provide well assimilated, because such careful preparation neutralizes phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors and breaks down difficult-to-digest complex sugars.

So, first decide the amount of beans you will need. A canner load of 7 quarts will require approximately 5 pounds of beans. A load of 9 pints will require about 3 1/4 pounds of dried beans.

Wash the beans under cold water and drain. Cover the beans with water. Allow to soak for 12 – 18 hours. Drain and rinse the beans.

Step 2. Partially Cook the Beans
Place the soaked beans in a large pot and add water to cover the beans. Bring the beans to a boil, skimming off any foam. Gently simmer, covered, for 30 minutes. This will only partially cook the beans; they will finish cooking in the canner.
 

joel

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Step 3. Set Up Your Pressure Canner
While the beans are cooking, prepare your pressure canner.

Place the rack in the bottom of your canner, and fill your canner with approximately 2 quarts of water.

Bring the water to a simmer.

Step 4. Get Your Canning Supplies Ready
To pressure can dried beans, you will need:

  • clean quart or pint glass canning jars, kept in hot water until ready to fill
  • metal lids and bands for each jar (lids must be new and cannot be reused for canning, but the bands may be reused)
  • a jar funnel
  • a jar lifter
  • non-metallic spatula
  • your soaked and partially cooked legumes
  • salt (optional)
Step 5. Fill Your Jars
Fill your hot jars with partially cooked, hot beans, leaving 1 inch headspace. If desired, add 1/2 teaspoon of salt to each pint jar or 1 teaspoon to each quart jar. Ladle the hot liquid from your bean pot into each jar, covering the beans and leaving 1 inch headspace.

Using the spatula, remove any air bubbles from your jars by placing the spatula between the beans and the side of the glass jar, gently pushing on the beans to release trapped air. Do this several times around the jar. Don’t use a metal spatula which may scratch the glass.

Wipe the rim of each jar with a clean, wet cloth. Place a lid and a band on each jar, tightening the band, but not forcing it.

Step 6. Place Jars in Canner
Place the filled jars onto the rack in the bottom of your pressure canner, which has approximately 2 quarts of simmering water in it.

Step 7. Process the Beans
Now place the lid on your canner and secure the lid according to the manufacturer’s instructions. With the heat on medium-high, vent the steam for 10 minutes.

https://learningandyearning.com/pressure-can-dried-beans
 

Terri9630

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I don't soak our beans, just rinse and go through them. I put 1/2 a cup of beans in a pint jar and fill the jar with water. 1" headspace. Process for 1hr 15min for pints at the pressure for your elevation.
 

Tank-Girl

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I don't soak our beans, just rinse and go through them. I put 1/2 a cup of beans in a pint jar and fill the jar with water. 1" headspace. Process for 1hr 15min for pints at the pressure for your elevation.

Thank you!

Wow! Who knew it was that easy?
I thought they were going to be fiddly but that method is a no brainer.

Awesome stuff.
 

Dani

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Ive tried cooking them first, partial cooking, and plain ole dry. Now I prefer canning dry cause less time. Only thing is they soak up the majority of the liquid so depending what you are using them for add more liquid after opening.
 

Terri9630

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Ive tried cooking them first, partial cooking, and plain ole dry. Now I prefer canning dry cause less time. Only thing is they soak up the majority of the liquid so depending what you are using them for add more liquid after opening.
It makes a nice thick "sauce", just the way hubby likes them. Sometimes I will add a bit of his spicy sausage to the jar for flavoring or use beef broth (homemade) instead of water.
 

Terri9630

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I get pintos fresh and shelled from the field. They are not dried yet. 1 bushel is about 20 lb (ice bag full). I wash and pat dry, spread on a cookie sheet, and back in the freezer. 1 to 1& 1/2 hours cook time and to the table. So good!!!

We grow our own pintos and kidneys. Can some and save some.
 

Meerkat

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I don't soak our beans, just rinse and go through them. I put 1/2 a cup of beans in a pint jar and fill the jar with water. 1" headspace. Process for 1hr 15min for pints at the pressure for your elevation.
We can ours for 90 min.s. Make all kinds of meals out of qt jars. Especially chili and bean burritos, sometimes meatless tacos. All the sauce on these you can't taste the meat anyway. And meat aint what it use to be ,if its even meat or what they say it is.
 

Terri9630

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We can ours for 90 min.s. Make all kinds of meals out of qt jars. Especially chili and bean burritos, sometimes meatless tacos. All the sauce on these you can't taste the meat anyway. And meat aint what it use to be ,if its even meat or what they say it is.

That's the difference. Quart vs pint. Pints are 75, quarts are 90.
 

Terri9630

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I pressure can most dried beans without soaking or cooking but I have heard that we should soak and partially cook kidney beans because of some toxin that is in them. You can probably google it and get a better explanation.

That is a problem with raw or undercooked beans. Has nothing to do with soaking or not soaking. The toxin is killed at 180 degrees F.
 

NannyPatty

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I am curious how many beans does one plant for what yield? I have tried growing beans with little luck. The best luck I have had is with green pole beans. I would love to be able to grow black, navy, pinto and more.
I think it just depends on the variety of the bean. Pintos are a hardy plant and yields very well in our warmer climates. Pole beans seem to do well in Oklahoma. We get pretty hot and dry in the summers.
 

Terri9630

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I am curious how many beans does one plant for what yield? I have tried growing beans with little luck. The best luck I have had is with green pole beans. I would love to be able to grow black, navy, pinto and more.
I don't really know. I planted 6 plants and I'll have to dig through my jars to be sure, but I canned a couple dozen pints and still had around 3 half gallon jars or so of pintos and a bit less of the kidneys.
 

Weedygarden

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I don't really know. I planted 6 plants and I'll have to dig through my jars to be sure, but I canned a couple dozen pints and still had around 3 half gallon jars or so of pintos and a bit less of the kidneys.
You cannot imagine how many beans I have planted and gotten very little. Clearly, I could never support myself being a bean farmer and if I needed to raise my own food, I would be better off raising potatoes, because I have had lots of success raising them.
 

Bacpacker

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I grew wheat one year just to try it out. Planting and growing went great. Planted a 25x100' patch with a broadcast spreader, then drove over it with my Kubota with turf tires to firm it in the ground in late September. It came up by mid October and by Feburary was growing great and got very thick. By May it was over knee high and started turning a beautiful golden color. By the end of June it was ready to harvest. I have my stepdads Scythe that I used to cut weeds on our bank next to the road with. It cut pretty well, but I'm no longer in shape to do that work for several days straight. It was an eye opener as to how hard growing a large amount of crops would be to live on for a year at a time. Over all the wheat was a sucess, up to the point of how to sperate the wheat from the chaff. I tried a couple different things, but not a lot of luck with any of it.
 

Weedygarden

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I grew wheat one year just to try it out. Planting and growing went great. Planted a 25x100' patch with a broadcast spreader, then drove over it with my Kubota with turf tires to firm it in the ground in late September. It came up by mid October and by Feburary was growing great and got very thick. By May it was over knee high and started turning a beautiful golden color. By the end of June it was ready to harvest. I have my stepdads Scythe that I used to cut weeds on our bank next to the road with. It cut pretty well, but I'm no longer in shape to do that work for several days straight. It was an eye opener as to how hard growing a large amount of crops would be to live on for a year at a time. Over all the wheat was a sucess, up to the point of how to sperate the wheat from the chaff. I tried a couple different things, but not a lot of luck with any of it.
Very cool that you tried it! I think that wheat is something that a wheat farmer can grow and we can purchase from him, trade or barter. In researching genealogy in Bavaria and Bohemia, I saw that some people grew garlic while others grew cherries. Even hundreds of years ago, people were specialized in what they grew or raised. I imagine growing and knowing how to grow 6 things well would be easier than growing 30 or so.
 

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I grew wheat one year just to try it out. Planting and growing went great. Planted a 25x100' patch with a broadcast spreader, then drove over it with my Kubota with turf tires to firm it in the ground in late September. It came up by mid October and by Feburary was growing great and got very thick. By May it was over knee high and started turning a beautiful golden color. By the end of June it was ready to harvest. I have my stepdads Scythe that I used to cut weeds on our bank next to the road with. It cut pretty well, but I'm no longer in shape to do that work for several days straight. It was an eye opener as to how hard growing a large amount of crops would be to live on for a year at a time. Over all the wheat was a sucess, up to the point of how to sperate the wheat from the chaff. I tried a couple different things, but not a lot of luck with any of it.
I was thinking about trying that here but I figured that I'd just be fattening up the moose. Come to think about it that might be the best way to harvest the wheat.
 

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That would work out great if there was several families in close proximity. Just swap out what you grew for what they grew.

I would grow more wheat if I could come up with a good way to thresh it. But have choose to focus mostly on tomatos, peppers, squash, cabbage, onions, beans, and melons. I can do potatos, but they are cheap enough and saves a lot of time just to buy them. Now days it seems time factors in a lot for me. Gotta make the best use of it I can.
 

Bacpacker

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I was thinking about trying that here but I figured that I'd just be fattening up the moose. Come to think about it that might be the best way to harvest the wheat.
We have deer and turkey raid the garden at times. Corn don't stand a chance. And for some reason they love my watermelons. But they didn't touch the wheat that I could tell.
 
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